Yeast Infection – Should You Avoid Swimming?

It is very common that people believe a number of fallacies, myths and urban legends just because of hearing some weird stuff from a friend who saw or heard something from another friend.

The chain goes on and on until it reaches a point that what started out to be false become accepted as truth. Let’s focus on the problem at hand, shall we? It has been said that swimming or getting wet with a yeast infection would aggravate your current condition.

Now, having yeast infection may result to having some restrictions but it does not mean you cannot enjoy some daily activities like exercising and in this case swimming. On the contrary, keeping your body fit by exercising may be more beneficial for treating your infection. As you exercise, body wastes are removed from your system. It also helps restore balance within the body.

One of the reasons behind yeast infection is that fact that there is a massive growth of Candida albicans in the body. Candida is a fungi that resembles yeast. It is a naturally occurring organism and finding it in our body, specifically in the digestive track and vulva area, should not be a reason to be extremely alarmed. It is the unusually growth of Candida that causes the imbalance of microorganism in the body resulting to a Candida infection.

So does swimming have anything to do with worsening the infection? According to some observations and studies, it does not. You can go swimming all you want, on cold water or hot warm water even. What concerns me is what comes after swimming your heart’s out.

The process of swimming itself does not but keeping yourself wet during long periods of time wearing damp or moist clothes can affect the infection. By wearing damp clothing over long periods of time, you are creating a very favorable environment for the growth of Candida. Just like all other fungi, Candida like dark and damp areas to grow.

Also one of the things that keeps circulating is the notion that yeast infection can be passed on to others swimming in the same pool. That is not true at all. If you’re swimming in a pool, the chemicals that keep the pool clean will keep the microorganisms from being passed on to others. So don’t worry yourself that much about swimming with yeast infection. Just be more concerned in keeping yourself dry after you’re done with your swim. That is the most important thing. The same goes with sweaty clothes if you’re accustomed to working out.

You can avoid yeast infection by not using perfumed soaps all the time. The strong components of the soap can irritate the vaginal area. Natural non-perfumed soaps would be the best choice.

Taking antibiotics might also cause some yeast problems. The antibiotics generally upset the balance between the fungi microorganisms and other organisms in the body. So to help maintain balance of microorganism in the body, you can start with a diet of plain yogurt. Avoid the sweetened stuff for the sugar content can also trigger the growth of the Candida fungi.

Another avoidance technique is wearing loose clothing instead of sticking with your slick, tight attire. The more loose the clothes, the better when it comes to yeast infection. Having too tight pants do not allow the skin in the affected area breathe. Furthermore, cotton would be the ideal choice of clothing material instead of nylon or any other material.

So getting wet while having a yeast infection definitely does not cause any further problems with the infection as long as you keep yourself dry afterwards and observe some hygiene conditions.

Diagnosing Yeast Infection in Women
The female human body is an organic machine made of nerve, muscle and bone. It can nurture babies for up to nine months. But, like all machines, it is prone to the occasional malfunction, such as, well, getting candidiasis – better known as a yeast infection, or in this case vaginal thrush. So how do you go about diagnosing yeast infection?

Not Quite Yeast, Actually…
To begin, vaginal thrush is not brought about by yeast. The infection is actually caused by a fungus called Candida albicans which has yeast-like properties. It grows naturally in warm, moist, dark regions of the body, like the mouth and the vagina. Its growth is kept checked by a kind of beneficial bacteria which also grows in the human body. The job of Candida albicans is to search for harmful bacteria and destroy them.

The problem starts when the good bacteria that monitor the growth of Candida albicans die, either because of antibiotics or a weak immune system. Once these bacteria die, Candida albicans grow rapidly and spread aggressively. Add to this the fact that all candida fungi can pass through muscle or organ walls in the body (it has been known to penetrate intestinal walls), and there you have it – an infection that irritates the vagina as well as the vulva.