Wound Healing: A New Strategy for Hair Growth

In the hair transplant world, scientists are constantly looking for more advanced and efficient ways to treat hair loss.

In the latest issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine, a new research study was published: “A Rare Complication: New Hair Growth Around Healing Wounds.” This study is related to Dr. Mohebi’s personal research at Johns Hopkins Medical Institute on gene therapy techniques and wound healing and how it affected the growth of rats’ hair.

The journal study was about a man who had hair growth surrounding a healing wound at Guangxi Medical University in Nanning, China.

The doctors involved in the study mention an incident in which hair growth occurred around a wound during the process of wound healing. Hair growth after wound healing is an uncommon occurrence. This is the first time such an event had ever been recorded in scientific literature.

The doctors concluded that the wounds damaged the hair follicles and epidermis, but that it was possible for both to repair themselves if there was a suitable physical and chemical micro-environment. The doctors say that this new hypothesis may lead to new methods of managing hair loss, tissue engineering, and the regeneration of other organs.

At the laboratory of Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, and as part of my overall research, I did a major investigative study on hair growth as a byproduct of wound healing. On a few mice, after witnessing wound healing, to my delight, I found that some gene therapy techniques stimulated the hair growth.

My attention was on hair growth only and, coincidentally, our results matched other hair growth-wound healing studies, during 2005 to 2006. At the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Cotsarelis, along with his contemporaries, first made public a study on the relationship between wound healing and hair growth through activation of the molecular pathway WNT.

Other similar studies have called attention to the fact that hair restoration through tissue engineering, hair multiplication, and gene therapy might one day happen and that we just may have a breakthrough a lot sooner than we expected all these years.

It’s important to note rather recent breakthroughs in other cosmetic surgery fields, such as Dysport for wrinkles. For an online medical discussion about topics such as wound healing and hairgrowth and anti-aging solutions, try doing a Web search for more information.

Parsa Mohebi, M.D.

Medical Director

US Hair Restoration