Winter Olympics – Injury List Continues To Grow – Knee Ligament Injuries And Neck Injuries

Pain Control are offering advice on Winter Sports injuries. Pain Control will keep a close eye on the injuries suffered at the Vancouver Winter Olympics and offered adivce on similar injuries.The motto of citius, altius, fortius – faster, higher, stronger – remains after 86 years still perfectly intact for the Winter Olympics but an alternative, as the Olympic movement embraces the X Games, might just as easily be ‘younger, scarier, riskier’.

Is edition XXI in Vancouver going to be the most dangerous Olympic edition the world has yet seen?

A catalogue of accidents and serious injuries this winter has offered sober reminders of what can happen when would-be Olympians, emboldened by technological advances in equipment, seek to push the boundaries of speed and complexity in their events to ever more hazardous levels.

The list of absent friends has shocked skiing officials. Canada’s world downhill champion John Kucera, who snapped the tibia and fibula of his left leg when turning somersaults into the safety fence at 65mph at Lake Louise, in Alberta. American half-pipe snowboarder Kevin Pearce steps on the long road to recovery from a brain injury suffered when failing to land an ambitious jump during training and tragically, the same applies to Florent Astier, a French ski cross exponent who crashed into a fellow racer last month and ended up requiring emergency surgery after suffering a severe spinal cord injury and paralysis.

Winter Sport – Related Injuries

Many different injuries can occur whist performing Winter based sports such as Skiing and snowboarding. Over the next few weeks Pain Control aims to cover the growing list of injuries suffered by Olympic athletes and offered advice if you have suffered a similar injury.

Ankle Sprain

A sprained ankle, also known as an ankle sprain, twisted ankle, rolled ankle, ankle injury or ankle ligament injury, is a common medical condition where one or more of the ligaments of the ankle is torn or partially torn. The anterior talofibular ligament is one of the most commonly involved ligaments. Sprains to the lateral aspect of the ankle account for 85% of ankle sprains.

Cold Feet

Durham’s Foot (Cold feet) or cryopedis is a condition that causes one’s extremities (mainly feet) to be incessantly well below the temperature of the rest of the body.

Symptoms
Durham’s Foot causes one’s feet to be cold almost constantly, but is generally only triggered when temperatures are cold outside. This is directly correlated to the fact that Durham’s Foot is simply the lack of the body’s ability to warm the extremities. The core of the body is able to stabilize its temperature after being exposed to cold, but is generally unable to do so with the extremities. Often, one might feel a burning pain in the extremities when exposed to lukewarm water. Other symptoms include the sense of coolness to the touch of the affected extremity, but the extremity is unable to feel any sense of warmth. Again, Durham’s Foot most commonly affects the feet, however there have been a few reported cases affecting the hands. While Durham’s Foot is often linked to circulation problems, it can also be attributed to diabetes.

Treatment
Only a few cases exist, so the treatments tend to be more towards easing the pain, than actually curing the condition. Doctors often recommend that the extremity be kept wrapped and covered, and to pay close attention to the actual temperature. Often, those with the condition will not realize when a foot is going into Stage 1 Hypothermia, as they simply feel that the temperature is normal (for their condition).