Top 10 Sprained Ankle Facts – The Most Important Things You Need To Know To Accelerate Healing

1. Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. And the body’s response to injury is to swell. Swelling also causes pain. Reduce the swelling, reduce the pain.

2. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint.

3. A sprain is an injury to ligaments, which connect bones to one another and is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move.

4. Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, swelling, and bruising.

5. The most common way the ankle is injured is when the ankle is twisted inward (inversion injury). With this injury, ligaments that support the ankle can be torn which leads to swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle.This makes the ankle somewhat unstable and difficult to stand on.

6. The vast majority of ankle sprains can be treated by taping the ankle or using an ankle brace and ibuprofen or other anti-inflammatory medication followed by a comprehensive sprained ankle rehabilitation program.

7. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many months to fully heal but with an advanced aggressive rehab protocol, 85% rehab is possible in as little as 7-10 days.

8. Often, the injured ankle remains a little weaker and less stable than the uninjured one. A proper recovery program such as the one found at http://www.fastrehab.com can prevent this problem.

9. The key points of rehabilitation are to control the pain and swelling by taking ibuprofen and RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation), then restore normal range of motion, strengthening muscle groups, and retraining proprioception of the ankle joint.

10. More than 25,000 people sprain their ankle each day, making sprained ankles account for approximately 1/4th of all sports-related injuries and the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults.

By aggressively reducing swelling, you can shorten the rehab time for most ankle injuries by 3-5 weeks. Once the swelling is gone and the joint can move freely, you can start strengthening the ankle and restoring range of motion.