The Hepatitis C Virus (hcv)

The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a small (50 nm in size), enveloped, single-stranded, positive sense RNA virus in the family Flaviviridae. HCV mainly replicates within hepatocytes in the liver, although there is controversial evidence for replication in lymphocytes or monocytes. Circulating HCV particles bind to receptors on the surfaces of hepatocytes and subsequently enter the cells. Two putative HCV receptors are CD81 and human scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-BI). However, these receptors are found throughout the body. The identification of hepatocyte-specific cofactors that determine observed HCV liver tropism are currently under investigation.

HCV has a high rate of replication with approximately one trillion particles produced each day in an infected individual. Due to lack of proofreading by the HCV RNA polymerase, HCV also has an exceptionally high mutation rate, a factor that may help it elude the host’s immune response.

Early studies of viral loads in eleven asymptomatically infected viral carriers (blood donors in 1989, prior to implementation of blood bank screening for HCV, and from whom the donated blood units were rejected because of elevated alanine transaminase (ALT) liver enzyme levels) indicated that asymptomatic viral loads in blood plasma varied between 100/mL and 50,000,000/mL.

Although hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C have similar names (because they all cause liver inflammation), these are distinctly different viruses both genetically and clinically. Unlike hepatitis A and B, there is no vaccine to prevent hepatitis C infection.