CPPS Causes Uncomfortable Penis Pain

Even the mention of penis pain is enough to get some guys feeling tense. All men know how very sensitive the penis is; that sensitivity is responsible for the glorious feelings a male experiences during orgasm, but it’s also responsible for the intense pain that the manhood sometimes suffers. Proper penis care helps to strengthen the organ, but penis pain still occurs. Getting hit in the crotch is one common source, but it’s passing pain. Something like CPPS (chronic pelvic pain syndrome) is longer lasting.

What is CPPS?

CPPS is a condition which can strike both men and women; when it occurs in men, it may go by other names, such as chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. CPPS is defined as a pain or discomfort in the pelvic area that lasts for three months or longer and does not have a bacterial agent as the cause.

There is still a great deal being learned about CPPS, and at this point, most of the time a diagnosis is arrived at by ruling out other possible causes – which means that it can take some time before a proper diagnosis is made. When a man has CPPS, he experiences penis pain (sometimes significant) and has urinary symptoms similar to a urinary tract infection – but without the bacteria that cause such an infection. Sexual dysfunction, frequently related to the penis pain, is also typical.

CPPS is found in between 2% and 16% of men around the world and is thought to be the most common urologic disease in men who are under 50 years of age. (Women also have a female version of CPPS.)

When a man has CPPS, there is a general underlying discomfort in the pelvic region, sometimes specifically in the penis, sometimes elsewhere in the region (the balls, the perineum, etc.). Penis pain is often pronounced when urinating or ejaculating.

Prevention and treatment

Although doctors do not yet know the cause of CPPS, there are theories. Some suspect it is an immune disorder, others suspect increased pressure in the prostate, and some suggest trauma may be a factor.

However, in some men there do seem to be some identifiable triggers which are associated with CPPS. These include possible reactions to food or drink, especially spicy foods, alcohol, coffee and tea. Lack of sufficient exercise can also help bring about CPPS in some men. Therefore, prevention strategies often involve dietary changes to limit potential triggers and programs to ensure greater physical activity.

There are numerous treatment options which may be employed in treating CPPS and its symptoms. In addition to changing the diet and increasing exercise, doctors may recommend a range of medications. Anti-inflammatory drugs as well as pain medications are often used, as are muscle relaxants. Alpha blockers are often prescribed, as these can help relax the muscles around the prostate. Prostate massagers are also sometimes utilized for the same purpose. When pain is intense while sitting, use of a pillow or inflatable ring may be beneficial. Some men report improvement from use of acupuncture.

Men with CPPS may experience psychological issues because of the pain, and these can often worsen the condition. Counseling is often recommended to help a man learn how to better deal the disorder when it is chronic and long lasting.

Working with a doctor is important to relieve penis pain from CPPS. When the penis is already in good shape, that helps to deal with conditions like CPPS, so men are urged to daily apply a top notch penis health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Keeping penis skin well moisturized helps provide some soothing relief, so select a crème that includes both a high end emollient (such as shea butter) and a natural hydrator (such as vitamin E). In addition, look for a crème that contains vitamin D, which when added to a personal care regimen can provide important health benefits (especially during the long dark winter months).

Can the Flu Virus Really Spread in a Swimming Pool?

The flu has become a great concern to many people. This is especially the case with the rise of the H1N1 strain. When in the swimming pool it helps to know that this condition can be tough to pass around. It will still be important to handle all proper cleaning processes though.

A study by the Center for Disease Control states that some types of this condition can be disinfected by chlorine. Recommended levels of chlorine for a swimming pool have been found to be able to disinfect some types of flu viruses. This has been found to be the case for the avian strain of flu. It is not fully certain as to whether or not the H1N1 form can be handled.

Even with this factor the there is no way how this can be fully disinfected in pool water. Germs that can get into the water over time can still be found around the water. This is because of how the effects of chlorine in the water can easily weaken over time unless new chlorine materials are inserted into the water. Therefore the effectiveness of the chlorine to kill off germs can vary.

The virus can be spread in areas that are outside of a swimming pool. These include handlebars for getting in and out of the pool, physical areas for any diving boards and even materials that are around the locker rooms of a pool area. A pool area can be treated like a public place in many cases and as a result it can be a place where it can spread just as easily.

A good thing to do with regards to helping to keep from getting in contact with the flu is to be sure to wash oneself before and after getting into a swimming pool. It also helps to be sure to avoid going to a pool if one is not feeling well. This is so that it will be easier to keep from getting the flu virus to spread around.

Some flu forms can be disinfected in a swimming pool but it is not all forms of this condition are known to be able to be handled easily. It will be important to be aware of how it can spread in areas outside of the water though. Fortunately using a few processes for cleaning can help to keep the virus from being spread at a pool.

Glaucoma Prevention is Possible – With Antioxidant Nutrition

Although not widely promoted, age-related eye diseases such as glaucoma have been rising, along with all the other degenerative diseases such as cancer, heart disease, arthritis and Alzheimer's. Four million Americans now suffer from glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Approximately 120,000 of these people have actually gone blind from glaucoma. Ten percent of the population in America between the ages of 66 and 74 have macular degeneration, thirty percent of the population from 75-85 years old.

What makes these numbers so astonishing is that these are diseases that do not have to occur at all if people were getting enough antioxidants in their diet. Studies suggest that diets rich in antioxidants may help reduce your risk of developing age-related diseases like glaucoma.

Foods for Protecting Your Eyesight

For basic prevention of degenerative eye problems, antioxidants called carotenoids are the most important ones to consider. Carotenoids are found in fruits and vegetables that are red, orange, and deep yellow in color, such as carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, tomatoes, corn, and peppers, among others. Dark-green leafy vegetables are some other good sources. The highest concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin is found in egg yolks, another reason not to avoid this incredibly nutritious food.

Dark green vegetables are other good sources of lutein and zeaxanthin. Think of kale, spinach, turnip greens, collard greens, romaine lettuce, broccoli, zucchini, garden peas and brussels sprouts, corn, kiwi and honeydew.

If you eat a lot of foods from this list on a daily basis, you are probably giving your eyes all the antioxidants that they need for glaucoma prevention. However, I suspect that this includes a very small percentage of the population. How about you?

When Should You Supplement Your Diet with Carotenoids?

If you're not keen on these foods, or you have some already-developed symptoms of degenerative eye disease, you might want to consider nutritional supplements specifically designed for eye nutrition. A single capsule of one of these can provide you with 25,000 International Units of mixed carotenes, an amount large enough to get powerful antioxidant protection from cancer and heart disease, as well as eye problems. In order to get that much from your diet, though, you've got to eat these depths of any one of the following:

  • 3 medium-sized cooked carrots, or
  • 3 cups of collard greens
  • 2 cups of spinach
  • 3 sweet potatoes
  • 9 cups of cantaloupe
  • 6 cups of red peppers

You can see why taking carotene supplements can be so powerful!

What are the best Carotenoid Supplements for Glaucoma Prevention?

Mixed-Carotene Supplements Look for natural, mixed carotenes combined into one capsule. The carotene content of these supplements is usually listed in international units (IU). Look for products made from an algae called Dunaliella salina, in amounts of from 10,000IU to 25,000IU of beta carotene. These mixed carotene supplements will typically include the carotenoids alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, and cryptoxanthin. You'll need at least that much to get the full antioxidant benefits from the carotenoids.

Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Lutein and zeaxanthin are the only carotenoids found in the retina and lens of the eye. When combined with vitamin C and vitamin E, they protect your eyes from free radical damage and improve your vision by filtering out potentially-dangerous ultraviolet radiation from the sun.

Bilberry

For more protection, or for treating specific eye problems, you could also take one of the combinations that combine lutein and zeaxanthin with bilberry. These supplements usually contain 10 to 20mg. of lutein and about 1mg. of zeaxanthin. That would be the equivalent of eating about 3 cups of cooked spinach or a dozen-and-a-half eggs. The typical dose for bilberry is usually between 40mg. for preventive measures and 160mg. per day as a therapeutic dose.

Ginkgo Biloba

Ginkgo Biloba is an herbal supplement that has also been shown to be extremely beneficial for eye health. This herb increases blood flow in the capillary network and repairs oxidative stress damage to the capillary walls and retina. Ginkgo is certainly a valuable part of a glaucoma prevention program, as well as for cataracts and macular degeneration.

Astaxanthin

Another relatively new discovery for eye problems is the carotenoid astaxanthin, extracted from microalgae. Astaxanthin is one of the most powerful antioxidants that we know of. It is one of the few antioxidants that can cross the blood-retinal barrier and bring protection to the eyes. It is said to be more beneficial for the eyes in some ways than lutein. It also works all through the body – organs and skin, and in every part of the cell.

Eyesight Combination Products

Some product-makers create antioxidant combinations specifically formulated for eyesight. These will include any number of nutrients beneficial for the eyes, including some of the ones mentioned above. What you pay for with the convenience of just one combination capsule is that the dosages of each will be somewhat lower than if they were separate supplements.

Do not Drop Out the Veggies Altogether!

Remember that carotenoid supplements will not have all of the phytonutrients that are present in the foods themselves, so do not drop out the veggies altogether! Diet is a key part of any glaucoma prevention program.

Flu of 2009

The 2009 flu season was supposed to be a “routine.” Usually, patients take their seasonal flu shot. Those people who had flu symptoms normally go to the doctor’s office for an exam and testing. It is usually easy to spot the flu patients. Among the usual nasal congestion and sore throats, there are certain people whose appearance is really just sickly. These people usually appear to have just woken up, their hair is mussed, they are unshaven, and they are covered in sweaters or blankets but still shivering. In the doctor’s office, they are brought back and examined for signs of the flu or other problems. If their throat is red, they are usually checked for strep throat.

The flu nasal swab, which is an antibody test for types A or B Flu, then became available. Judging by the patient’s clinical appearance and a positive test for Flu A or B, the doctor might prescribe the antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza to lessen the severity and length of illness. However, 20% of the American population acquired the 2009 flu thus far. Billions of dollars in lost work productivity and hospital expenses come out of the country’s pocket. At least 200,000 patients were hospitalized and there were 36,000 flu-related deaths. On top of that, something new now was added for 2009.

The great scientists at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta maintain careful observation over flu outbreaks all over the world. They test and name each flu. Using this data, scientists try to predict what seasonal flu will appear in the fall. They supervise pharmaceutical companies in the manufacture of the specific vaccine. When the flu scientists reach their prediction on the button, the vaccine is effective in 70 to 90% of recipients under age 65. It is less effective in recipients over 65, recipients who live in nursing homes, and those with chronic underlying illness. The vaccine is about 30% to 70% effective.

The usual seasonal vaccine contains attenuated virus of the A (H1N1) and the A(H3N3) variety. A virus is not actually a separate live entity, so when we severely debilitate, we then say in the vaccine “attenuation.” A virus is arguably the smallest semi-life form that exists in nature. It can only be seen with an electron microscope. It is called an obligate parasite. This means it must “live” within another living cell. It can only survive and replicate by taking over that cell’s complex biochemical machinery to manufacture other viral units like itself. The influenza virus has its RNA taken up by a host cell to begin the manufacture process. Eventually the host cell dies by its viral infection.Influenza viruses were first identified and studied by scientists in the 1930’s.

Type A viruses were the worst, and the ones typically producing epidemics and global pandemics. An epidemic is a local outbreak of the flu, usually annually, by viruses that already exist in the environment. It usually peaks in three weeks, and subsides after three weeks, sometimes affecting 50% of the population of that area.

The pandemic is a different phenomenon altogether. It is caused by a mutated virus to which humans do not have an immunity. It can be spread worldwide. Scientists found that they could identify Type A viruses into subtypes by protein structures on their outer surfaces. These are called H (Hemagglutinin A) and N (Neuramidase B). There is no division of a Type B virus into a subtype because they cause milder symptoms and are more sporadic. Type C influenza viruses are not subtyped because they cause even milder symptoms and less evidence of outbreaks. The Type A viruses caused the pandemics of 1917, 1957, and 1967 when millions of lives were lost. The worst year for this was 1918.

Pandemics can be caused by a viral mutation or the re-emergence of a virus that has not been around for years. All in all, humans lack immunity to that specific virus and cannot fight them. Viruses do not stay in humans throughout the year as they are prevalent in primarily fall and winter. Where do they stay dormant and hide? Scientists discovered that certain coastal birds seem to be the reservoir for the viruses. There is fairly good evidence that the birds harbor these viruses without manifesting disease and have probably done so for millions of years. You may see a television show where scientists raise huge nets to catch migrating coastal birds to see what viruses they are carrying. Therefore, probably all “flu” is, to an extent, “avian” or “bird flu”. It is theorized that wild ducks infect domestic ducks, which in turn, either spread it to chickens or swine. Therefore, most of the flu is “swine” flu. You are not going to catch the flu from a piece of pork in your refrigerator.

The current H1N1 seems to have started with a small swine population in a desolate area of Mexico. The American pork industry has been recently affected due to the public not buying as much pork. But this is not the problem. The problem seems to be this one batch of flu that arose in Mexico to which humans did not have an immunity. With travel being what it is today, it did not take long for the virus to spread from person to person. It has recently even been announced that a group of swine were found to have the swine flu in Minnesota. It seems that both pigs and possibly chickens have the same viral receptors as humans and thus can be a vector for human transmission.

Some people are not getting “Novel H1N1” (the newer name for the 2009 Swine Flu) because they perhaps gain some immunity from previous H1N1 immunization. Most people who saw the outbreak of swine flu in Mexico thought it was too far away to affect them. However, as we know, times have changed. Swine Flu (“Novel H1N1 Flu”) is now widespread in most of the United States and elsewhere in the world. You will hear about it on almost every newscast and different government agencies hold numerous press conferences. The amount of daily information is enormous.

The best scientists of our time are saying, “Get your Flu shot when it is available.” (Actually they are saying,”Get your seasonal Flu shot now and the Swine or Novel H1N1 vaccination as soon as it is available.”) On the other side are the “nay-sayers” who say, “The 2009 Flu is not as bad as they said. Don’t give it to your children: it will give them autism. It has mercury or thimerosal in it. For my part, I’m siding with the CDC: Everybody should have the seasonal vaccination and the H1N1 vaccination.

One thing to remember is that it takes time for the immune system to respond to the vaccine for the 2009 flu. A conservative estimate is that it takes 6-8 weeks to achieve its desired effect. That is why the vaccine is better if you take it sooner than later. There are two kinds of flu vaccine; more will become available as they are released. Flu-Mist is an attenuated virus that is squirted into your nose. Because it is attenuated, it will not give you the flu and are not infectious. This is approved for use on patients aged 2 to 49.

The other is the Flu Shot, usually administered in the upper arm. The shot can cause some mild symptoms like pain at the injection site, low-grade fever, and slight sluggishness. These side effects respond to Tylenol or Motrin. Neither of the vaccines will give you the Flu, though the guy sitting in the next desk swears up and down that the Flu vaccine always gives him the Flu. Both treatments are grown in eggs, so if you have an egg allergy you must discuss this with your doctor to plan a strategy or avoid the injection.

We know that people with impaired immune systems get worse illness. In pregnancy, the immune system is not up to par. Of the 100 or so patients who have required Intensive Care Unit treatment, 28 pregnant women have died. That is why the 2009 Flu vaccination (both kinds) are so important for all pregnant females. There have been no adverse effects of Flu vaccination in any pregnant female. Others with impaired immunity have worse Flu illness: Diabetics, people with liver or kidney disease, AIDS, chronic neurological impairment, cancer, and/or chronic inflammatory diseases like arthritis and colitis. And the list goes on and on with chronic medical disease. These are the ones that push the numbers into the thousands for Flu-related deaths and prolonged hospitalizations.

And there is one other very important group: Kids. Their immune systems just have matured and acquired the antibody response that healthy adults have. In shear numbers, children get the Flu 2 to 3 more times than adults. That is why we are hearing tragic stories about otherwise healthy 7 or 10 year olds who have died with the Flu (there were 11 pediatric deaths in this country during week 38 of the current epidemic). This is the reason that as the CDC is releasing vaccine, they are targeting children for vaccination among the first to receive it.In Novel H1N1 Flu, 77 people autopsied, fully one third had Streptococcus pneumoniae, or as it is also called, pneumococcal pneumonia. True, it’s variably treatable with antibiotics.

But there is a proven vaccine available for this bacteria. It protects against 23 encapsulated pneumonia bacteria. It’s available for all ages with increased risk for immune deficiency. We know now that only one-third of those who should receive it actually get it. It can be given along with the flu vaccine. Ask your doctor about it: “Pneumovax 23”.The H1N1 2009 Flu is spread by respiratory droplets. This is why students in classrooms and military recruits in barracks are so susceptible. All it takes is one cough or sneeze, and the virus is out there ready to be picked up by the next person. It can persist on surfaces like grocery cart handles for 2 to 6 hours—-touch those hands to your eyes, nose or mouth, and you’re exposed. The incubation is 1 to 4 days after you’ve breathed in the virus-laden droplets. It’s ironic that you, in turn, are at most risk of spreading it to others the day before you first show signs of illness. No wonder it spreads!

Children can be infected for more than 10 days. Severe immune deficiency can cause a person to shed the virus for weeks or months. These people should kindly wear their masks when they are around the rest of us. The symptoms of the 2009 Flu are pretty universally recognized: Malaise (Just feeling tired and sick), chills, fever, headache, bodyache, nasal congestion, sore throat, and sweats to name the most common. There are danger signs, though: A pregnant woman with the Flu, productive cough (say, with discolored sputum), chest pain, altered level of consciousness, (maybe disoriented or hard to arouse), appearing gray or with bluish lips like someone who is not getting enough oxygen, severe vomiting or signs of dehydration. When these are present, it’s time to get to the doctor or the ER. These are signs that you have some potentially serious complication of the Flu.

Most people will not have the serious symptoms, but we all need to be alert for them. Likewise most people with the Flu get better within a week or two. If the symptoms come roaring back after an initial clearing (relapse), this is a danger signal. In these circumstances, one might have pain with each breath, cough up nasty-looking sputum, or have hard shaking chills. Don’t fool around: Get to the doctor. Once again, children can have more serious symptoms and complications: Convulsions due to high fever, middle ear infections, and pneumonia.Let’s now talk about treatment. First of all don’t give aspirin to a child with fever. It is associated with Reye’s Syndrome: A serious multi-organ failure with potentially catastrophic brain injury. You can give Tylenol (acetaminophen) every 4 hours according to body weight for chills, fever, malaise and headache. Motrin (ibuprofen) every 6 hours seems to be a safe alternative. The person should take in a lot of fluids— Water, Gatorade, light soups, and eat lightly as the stomach allows. Bedrest with lots of naps is recommended to shorten the length of illness.

The person should stay home from work or school until there has been at least one full day without Tylenol or Motrin, and no fever. But what about the pregnant woman, the patient with chronic medical conditions, the person with decreased immune function, and very symptomatic children? These are the cases in which the doctor must see and decide whether to prescribe antiviral medication. It can be used prophylactically for persons closely exposed to the Flu patient to lessen or prevent the Flu. The 2 antivirals that we use are oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza). Tamiflu comes as a caplet for adults or a liquid for children. Relenza comes in a metered dose inhaler. Both are used every day for 10 days. They work best when given within the first two days of symptoms. They decrease the severity of the symptoms and shorten the course of the 2009 Flu. Relenza is not a good choice for patients with asthma or chronic lung disease.

The CDC and the Biopharmaceutical companies have worked exhaustively to prepare a safe vaccine to keep people from getting the severe ramifications of the flu. That’s it, pure and simple. There is a lot of magical, wishful thinking in the population on how to “beat the flu,” but science is not on their side. There is no vitamin, raw vegetable, or special drops to prevent the flu. “Flu Parties” are a terrible idea to get flu immunity. It is time to realize that the CDC is a collection of the best minds in science and medicine, dedicated to the protection of health for the U.S. citizens and person around the world in the event of a pandemic. It is not the IRS, Homeland Security, or the CIA. It is doctors and scientists trying to keep the public well, period. It’s time to stop blowing the conspiracy horn and take your shots. In doing so, you protect yourself, your family, your co-workers, and your fellow citizens in general. So, roll up those sleeves!

I was watching a press conference the other day by Dr. Ann Schuchat, the CDC Immunization Director. She had a very well-constructed report addressing the plans for mass immunization in a tiered way so that the ones at most risk would receive their vaccinations first. She was very candid about flu deaths to the present, and the intricacies of combating the epidemic, or more correctly, the pandemic of novel H1N1 (Swine Flu, as it is often known.) What impressed me a lot was the presence of major news reporting organizations: AP, UPI. Atlanta Journal, Washington Post, ABC, and USA Today. They all asked excellent questions and received excellent answers. The conference lasted about 35 minutes, and if every person could tune in to these informative events or rely on major reporting presentations, there would be a lot less misinformation out there.

Here is the discussion of the 2009 flu in a nutshell:

1.) Get your seasonal flu vaccination, either shot or nasal spray;
2.) Get your Novel H1N1 (Swine Flu) vaccination when it is available;
3.) If you are pregnant or have chronic illness be sure to get both;
4.) Be sure kids are vaccinated;
5.) If you have severe flu or a relapse–see your doctor;
6.) If you have the warning signs of severe illness– see your doctor;
7.) Wear a mask if you are sick or severely immune deficient;
8.) It takes about a week to get over the flu. Do not return to work or school until you have been fever-free for at least 48 hours; drink plenty of fluids, take Tylenol or Motrin for fever, and bedrest as much as possible. Do not give other over-the-counter medicines to young children without consulting a doctor; do not give aspirin for fever as it may lead to Reye’s Syndrome;
9.) Learn as much as you can about the Flu from reliable sources;
10) There are no magical Flu preventatives or treatments out there–Rely on science and a physician to get through this time.

Female Alopecia – Information, Causes, Prevention, and Treatment Options

Female Alopecia

1.-Introduction
2.-Growth cycles
3.-Main Causes
4.-Secondary Causes
5.-Topical treatments
6.-Oral treatments
7.-Cosmetic treatments
8.-Conclusion

Introduction

With different colors, styles and variations, young or mature, male or female, the hair has an important role in a person's image.

While advertising for products that "strengthen the hair" are almost always male-oriented, it may seem that women do not suffer from alopecia. The reality is that over two thirds of women face the challenges of hair loss at some point in their lives.

Many women find this very disturbing, perhaps more than men. In addition, the female physiology is unique, and factors such as menstrual cycles, pregnancy and menopause are particularly important.

For some women, hair loss can be genetic; however, many of the causes of female hair loss are treatable.

Without a doubt, the physical appearance of women depends very much on their hair. For many women, their hair is a sign of youth and vitality.

Hair structure:

The external portion of the hair, called the stem, is the part of the hair that we see and style. In reality it is dead tissue produced by hair follicles, small bag-shaped structures located deep in the scalp. Each hair is enclosed within a follicle.

The average head has 100,000 hairs. At the base of the follicle is the oval shaped root, which is responsible for the growth of hair. In the lower portion of this is the papilla, which contains blood capillaries that provide blood to each hair.

As hair grows, the cells move towards the surface of the skin and become a protein called keratin, being replaced by new cells. Keratin is the same protein found in the nails.

The stem is composed of 3 layers: the cuticle, the cortex and medulla. The cuticle, or outer layer, consist of small cells known as scales. The cuticle serves as a case for the cortex, the thickest portion of the stem, composed of cells arranged in the form of tobacco leaves. The cortex holds the pigment that gives hair its color. The medulla is composed of cells with the form of a case and is located in the center. The spaces between cells in the medulla influence the refraction of light in tone and hair.

Glands and muscles

The hair is lubricated by oily secretions from the sebaceous glands, located on the sides of most follicles. Surrounding these glands and the rest of the follicle, there are groups of muscles (arrector pili) that allow the hair to stand up when a person is cold or afraid.

Cycles of growth

The average head has 100,000 hairs. Hair grows and is renewed regularly. Normally, 50 to 100 hairs fall out every day. If there are no problems, this loss will most likely go un-noticed.

Hair grows about 1 cm per month, although this growth Declines as we age. Every hair on your head remains there for about two to six years, and during most of this time it is growing. When the hair is older it enters a resting stage in which it remains on the head, but stops growing. At the end of this phase the hair falls out. Typically, the follicle replicates the hair in about six months, but many factors can disrupt this cycle. The result may be that the hair falls out soon or is not replaced. Normally 90% of hair is in continuous growth (anagen phase) that lasts 2 to 6 years. 10% of hair is in a resting phase, which lasts about 2-3 months. At the end of this stage it is normal for the hair to fall out (telogen phase).

As the hair falls out is replaced by a new hair from the hair follicle, located under the skin. Through a person's life span no new hair follicles are formed. Blonds have the most hair (140,000 hairs) followed by dark hair (105,000) and red hair (90,000). As we age the rate of hair growth diminishes, leading to a progressive thinning of hair. Since the hair is composed of protein (keratin), and this material is also in the nails, it is essential that all people ingest or eat an abundant amount of protein to maintain the healthy hair production. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, Cereals, nuts and soy.

Main causes

Androgenetic alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss. It is mainly determined by 3 factors: aging, hormones, and heredity.

Most people experience some hair loss as they age. The result may be a partial or total baldness. Men are much more likely than women to experience baldness and hair loss when they get older, but "female baldness" can also be inherited, which can cause modest or significant hair loss in women as they age. Hair loss is initially interested between 25 and 30 years of age. In female hair loss, hair is replaced by increasingly thinner and shorter hair. Hair may even become transparent.

Usually, hair loss in women is less obvious than in men. Also, the pattern in which the hair falls out is different. It is most noticeable in the hair part, as well as the crown of the head, additionally the frontal hair line is retained. It is inherited from both father and mother.

About 50% of women who experience hair loss have "female baldness". In these cases there is an abundance of dihydrotestosterone (male hormone) in the hair follicle. The conversion of testosterone to DHT is regulated by the 5-alpha-reductase enzyme in the scalp. Over time, the action of DHT degrades, and shortens the growth phase of the follicle (Anagen). Although the follicle is technically alive, it grows less and less each time. Some follicles just die, but most become smaller and thinner. As the Anagenic Phase remains very short, hair gradually thins and falls out until it becomes so fine that it can no longer sustain daily hair combing. Baldness turns a long, thick pigmented hair into thin, clear and light hair. Neverheless, the sebaceous glands attached to the follicle remain the same size and continue to produce the same amount of sebum. When a medical treatment (flutamide, cyproterone or spironolactone) is able to reduce the male hormones, the sebaceous glands become smaller, and reduce their production of this hormone in the sebum causing less damage.

There also seems to be an immune factor in baldness. Basically, the immune system begins to target hair follicles in the areas of alopecia. The rise in male hormones (DHT) during puberty starts this process.

Secondary causes

A wide variety of factors can cause hair loss, often temporary, in women:

Birth Control Pills

The pills contain two ingredients, a synthetic estrogen and progestin. Women who experience hair loss while taking oral contraceptives are predisposed to a hereditary progressive hair thinning. This can be accelerated by the effects of the male hormone possessing some progestagens. If this happens, it is advisable to change to another type of oral contraceptive. Also, when a woman stops using certain oral contraceptives, she can be notice hair loss 2-3 months later. This lasts about 6 months and usually ceases. It would be similar to hair loss experienced after giving birth.

Iron deficiency anemia

Lack of iron causes hair loss in men as well as women. However, in women the problem is more prevalent, particularly in those with long or heavy menstrual cycles. The lack of iron can be detected easily with analysis, and corrected with medical treatment.

Diet

A diet low in protein can also cause hair loss, as can low iron intake. Vegetarians, people with diets low in protein, and patients with anorexia nervosa may be a protein deficient. When this occurs the body helps to conserve protein by moving hair growth to the resting stage. This can lead to heavy hair loss about 3 months after the hair growth enters the resting stage. When the hair is folded, it comes out easily at the root. This process is reversible with medical treatment, which requires an adequate intake of protein.

Post-partum

Some women lose large amounts of hair 2-3 months after giving birth. When a woman gives birth, too many hairs enter the resting phase. 2-3 months after she may notice a large number of hairs in the comb or brush after combing her hair. The hair loss can last about 6 months. The problem, in most cases, is resolved after appropriate medical treatment. Not all new mothers will suffer from this experience, and not all women will notice hair loss with each pregnancy.

Stress and illness

You may start to lose hair 1-3 months after a stressful situation, such as major surgery. High fevers, infections, severe or chronic diseases can also result in hair loss.

Thyroid Disease

An underactive or hyperactive thyroid can cause hair loss. These diseases are diagnosed by clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. These cases require special handling.

Medicines

Some drugs used in cancer chemotherapy cause hair cells to stop their division, resulting in thinner more fragile hair that easily breaks as it emerges from the scalp. This phenomenon occurs 1-3 weeks after the start of anticancer treatment. The patient can lose 90% of their hair. In most patients, hair grows back when anticancer treatment ends.

Also, many popular medications can cause hair loss.

Drugs that reduce cholesterol: clofibrate (Atromis-S) and gemfibrozil (Lopid).
rugs for Parkinson's: levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa).
Anti-ulcer drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet), ranetidina (Zantac) and famotidine (Pepcid).
Anticoagulants: Coumarina and Heparin.
Anti gotoso agents: Allopurinol (Loporin, Zyloprim, Zyloric).
Anti-arthritic: penicillamina, auranofin (Ridaura), indomethacin (Inacid), naproxen (Naprosyn), Sulindac (Clinoril) and methotrexate (Folex).
erivatives of Vitamin-A: isotretinoin (Accutane, Roacutan) and etretinato (Tegison, Tigason).
Anti-convulsants / antiepileptics: trimethadione (Tridion).
Anti-depressants: tricyclics, amphetamines.
Beta blockers for hypertension: atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal) and timolol (Blocadren).
Anti-thyroid: carbimazole, iodine, thiocianato, thiouracilo.
Other anticoagulants, male hormones (anabolic steroids).

Alopecia Areata

A common disease that causes patches of hair loss on the scalp and other body parts. It affects men and women of all ages, but more commonly youth. The affected follicles significantly diminish their production of hair. They become very small and produce hair that is very noticeable. These follicles are in a resting state, and at any time can resume their normal activities after receiving a signal. Some people develop only a few bald spots that return to normal in about a year. Some people loose all of the hair on their head (alopecia totalis). In other people all body hair is lost (alopecia universal). It is believed that alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease in which the body mistakenly produces antibodies against the hair follicle (autoallergic). Anxiety and nervousness may trigger the disease or prevent it from healing. Treatment includes injecting cortisone, or by applying Minoxidil, cyclosporine, steroid creams or Anthralin to the affected area. In selected cases, UVA treatment, or the application of dibenciprona on the lesions is used in order to produce an allergic eczema to stimulate the resting follicle.

Tinea / ringworm

A fungal infection on the scalp. Small patches can cause flaking and some hair loss.

Inappropriate hair care

Many women use chemical treatments on their scalp, such as dyes, highlights, and perms. Chemical treatments can damage the hair if done incorrectly. The hair becomes weak and breaks when these substances are applied too often, left on too long, bleaching previously bleached hair, or when two or more procedures are performed in the same day. If the hair becomes too porous and dull by excessive exposure to chemical treatments, it is advisable to suspend these treatments until the hair has recovered. Shampoo, brushing and combing are necessary for proper care of the hair, but if done excessively or inappropriately can damage hair, causing it to break at the stalk, or produce split ends. You can use a conditioner or hair repair product after shampoo to reduce the force required to comb the hair and make it more manageable. When there are split ends, and hair that is difficult to comb, it is advisable to use hair repair products with silicone serums. Excess water should not be discharged and rubbed vigorously with a towel. When the hair is wet its structure is more fragile, and viguous combing or brushing should be avoided. Forget the old recommendation of combing or brushing in excess as well, because it damages hair. Use combs with widely spaced teeth and thin bristle brushes, preferably natural (wild boar bristle brushes for example). The hairstyles that require tension on the hair like curls and braids should be alternated with loose hair styles to avoid the constant "pull" that can produce hair loss, especially on the sides of the scalp.

Topical Treatments

1. Minoxidil. Is a vasodilator agent that has been used orally in the treatment of hypertension and is now widely used in treating various types of alopecia. In general, 1 ml of lotion is applied twice a day (every 12 hours) to dry hair, as humidity increases the penetration of the product several times. Works better in young men than in women (20 years), especially in those with mild hair loss (thinning) on ​​the crown, or a small bald patch 3-4 cm, but also is functional for a receding hairline. The response to Minoxidil varies from individual to individual. Treatment should be 2 to 5 years. The scalp will begin beginning to grow more hair from the small thin hairs. Minoxidil causes hair becomes thicker and healthier. The income is better for people suffering from hair loss for less than 2 years. Most see fuzz growing in the first few months. Some experience more hair loss after the first applications. This is due to the old hair should fall out in order for new hair to grow. Positive results can be seen in 4-8 months, although the maximum effects of Minoxidil are reached between 12-14 months.

2. Pyrimidine N-oxides. A generic class of hair tonics similar to Minoxidil (2.4-Diaminopyrimidine Aminexil-3-oxide). The results in more than 250 men and women include an 8% increase in hair growth after 6 weeks of treatment, compared to a decrease in the rate of hair growth with a placebo.

3. Tretinoin. Has been used for years in the treatment of acne. It is also a hair tonic in appropriate doses, particularly in combination with Minoxidil. If implemented together, first apply the Minoxidil, wait for it to dry (usually 15-30 minutes) and then apply Tretinoin. Tretinoin should be applied only at night. A slight irritation to the skin of the scalp is expected, especially at the beginning of the treatment.

4. Topical estrogen. Solutions of dienestrol or progesterone may be applied daily for 6-12 months.

5. Natural treatments. There are many treatments with vitamins, sulfur amino acids (cysteine, methionine, tiazolidin carboxylic acid), minerals (zinc) and plant extracts (Indian horse chestnut, calendula) that are useful as dietary supplements and promote healthier hair. Sulfur favors the formation of keratin, the protein that gives structure to the hair. The plant extracts act to stimulate the circulation and revitalize the hair follicle. Zinc gluconate is an astringent and reduces sebaceous secretion by inhibiting the production of DHT when applied topically. Amniotic fluid and tricosacarides hydrate and stimulate the follicle.

6. Others. Lately, lotions containing superoxide dismutase (copper peptide ligands) are being used to strengthen and activate the growth of hair. This is based on the fact that there are chemical messengers in the body that send signals to hair follicles to start the Anagen and telogen phases. In this sense, focused more towards the telogen phase (resting phase), while nitric oxide causes the hair to enter the anagen (growth) phase. Obviously, the treatments should stimulate the levels of nitric oxide and reduce the levels of superoxide radicals used in superoxide dismutase and antioxidant agents.

Oral treatments

"Dietary supplements (vitamins, sulfur amino aids) Although androgenetic alopecia is not due to lack of vitamins, it is suggested that certain sulfur amino acid supplements (arginine, cysteine), vitamins and minerals (biotin, iron, folic acid) favor capillary nutrition, reduce fat, and promote the synthesis of the protein that gives structure to the hair (keratin) Many of these compounds have an antioxidant action.

"Antiandrogens.Request the male hormone (DHT) that causes baldness. DHT is an androgen (male hormone) competing for a place in the hair follicle receptors.If follicle receptors are occupied by other agents, DHT can not enter the hair follicle and thenfore does not mention its aggressive action. The problem is that by blocking DHT in other parts of the body signs of feminization may show in men. In contrast, for women this block is less problematic.

"Zinc. Affects hormone levels when taken orally and inhibits the production of DHT when applied topically.

"Espirolactona. Habitually used as a diuretic." It is one of the most powerful antiandrogens, which can cause hair loss. of 50 to 100 mg per day. It can alter the menstrual cycle and increase bleeding in some patients, but is generally well tolerated.

"(Cyproterone acetate) is a derivative of an anti-progesterone with antiandrogenic effects." It is used for the control of androgenetic alopecia in women only. at least 12 months and often requires 2 years for improvement. The result is more favorable if treatment is started within the first two years of the sunset of alopecia.

"flutamide. Another antiandrogic indicated for women. The treatment lasts 1-2 years.

Ketoconazole is an antifungal agent that has antiandrogenic properties. In men the treatment can be very effective with Finasteride, a drug normally used to treat hypertrophy of the prostate.

Cosmetic treatments

Cosmetic treatments include creative hairstyles, wigs, and hair transplants. To reduce the visual effect of the thinning hair, camouflage methods can be used.

Keeping the hair short, will make it appear less patched. This will also make it easier to maintain. Longer hair produces bunches and locks of hair that are separated, showing large areas of the scalp.

A skilled hairdresser can disguise thin hair in certain areas. If the hair is thin at the hair line, the hair line and extends to the temples, ask your hairdresser to cut your hair short in front, and leave it longer at the temples.

If your hair is thinner on the crown of your head, keep hair short, about neck length. Long hair is heavier, and this pulls hair, separating it at the crown and showing more of the bald area. If you still have a reasonably thick hair on the roof of the head, leave it long and cover the bald patches.

If the hair is very thin is more difficult to cover up alopecia areas. You can try a gentile perm to increase the hair volume.

If you have dark hair, you can try to lighten it a bit to reduce the contrast between the remaining hair and scalp, so making the skin less noticeable.

A cosmetic trick that may work in women is to apply a bit of hair colored eye shadow, on the scalp over the areas of thin hair. This is harmless and can make fine hair less noticeable.

Finally, do not use products that make tuffs or locks of hair stick together. This allows empty spaces on the scalp to be more easily seen.

Appropriate Shampoos

Maintaining clean hair helps preserve the health and beauty of hair. The frequency of washing and shampooing for each individual are important factors and should be recommended by a dermatologist. In the case of oily hair accommodated by thinning hair, frequent washing is advised because this reduces the fat on the surface of the scalp. It is important to have hair that is clean and non oily, as sebum contains elevated levels of dihydrotestosterone and testosterone (male hormones) that can be absorbed into the skin and affect hair follicles. In cases of dandruff and greasy hair that is washed frequently if it is best to switch to a treatment shampoo for frequent use. With these shampoos, you should wash your hair twice, and the second time leave it in for 2 -3 minutes without rubbing. The comb teeth should be wide and separated. Avoid metal brushes. If the hair has split ends (tricoptilosis) these can be repaired with a silicone polymer based repair serums, which acts as a patch on the split ends.

Conclusions

Hereditary hair loss is not curable, but it is controllable, and the sooner be treated the better. Currently there is not a perfect treatment for androgenetic alopecia, but there are drugs that stop hair loss and prolong the life of hair follicles.

We must consider the present and future hair treatments because hair needs living hair follicles. With baldness follicles are minimaturized and die after 5-10 years. With any treatment you will get better results with more follicles that remain alive. Many other hair problems are temporary and can be treated by dietary measures and other measures. In these cases, good dietary habits as well as eating supplements of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants help to stop hair loss and regain normal growth after a few months. For more information about hair loss, consult your dermatologist, because skin diseases include diseases of the hair and nails. Do not be influenced by advertisements for "hair tonic" or by hairdressing specialists.

Differential Diagnosis of Gout – What Causes The Joint Pain?

The differential diagnosis of patients presenting with joint pain is extensive, ranging from mild sprain, joint dislocation, trauma, malignancy, infection, and some life-threatening autoimmune diseases.

Joint pains that caused by physical activities are very obvious and easy to be diagnosed. Examples of this kind of injury are sprained ankle, joint separation, ligament sprain, torn cartilage and torn cartilage. Typically, this kind of pain is immediate and the patient can vividly remember the physical activity that causes the pain at the joint. These kinds of traumatic condition can happen to people of all ages.

Other causes of joint paint that usually affect people of older age are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis is the result of mechanical degradation of the joints due the years or wear and tear. It usually happens to those who were physically active during their younger years, such as sportsman or those who work in hard labor jobs.

One the other hand, rheumatoid arthritis is a form of autoimmune disease where the abnormal immune system attacks the tissues around the joints and causes inflammation and pain. The actual cause of rheumatoid arthritis is still unknown, some say it is because of viral or bacterial infections, some say it is because of genetically inherited abnormalities. Extensive researchers are still taking place around the world to find out the answer to this mysterious illness that affects a huge number of elderly population.

Although these 2 types of arthritis have very different causes, but they share certain similar symptoms that make them easy to be ruled out in the differential diagnosis of gout. Both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis typically develop the pain over a long period of time and they usually affect joints of both sides of the body such as in the feet, hands. These kinds of arthritis usually attack multiple joints at the same time and the pain develops gradually.

Another more common cause of joint pain in the modern day is gouty arthritis which is more commonly known as gout . Gout attack is a type of inflammation that is caused by the formation of urate crystals inside a particular joint due to long term exposure to hyperuricemia. Many times, gout is mistaken as one of the above mention arthritis conditions, especially when the patient get the gout attack for the very first time.

Differential diagnosis of gout is very straight forward and easy, here are some of the unique properties of gout that differentiate it from other causes of joint inflammation.

  • Sudden occurrence of intense pain
  • The attack starts in the middle of the night when the victim is sleeping
  • It usually attacks one side of the joints
  • 90% of the gout attacks happen at big toe
  • If blood test is conducted, it typically shows a high blood serum uric acid level that is beyond healthy range

Although Gout is easy to be diagnosed, but it is not easy to get rid this awful devil. Those gout drugs and pain killers can only temporarily control the gouty infection, none of them can remove the root cause of gout, which is the urate crystal.

It is commonly known among the gout patients that gout pain is the worst and most unbearable pain in their life. Instead of wasting your money on those expensive tests involved in the differential diagnosis of gout, you should spend some time to understand the actual cause of gout and remove the root once and for all.

Display Homes

The days are gone when you used to listen to plans and designs, or tried to understand them through some lines put down on a large sheet of paper. Times have changed and the technologies once limited to corporates only are now available for individual use. If you have a dream house in mind or are trying to find out your dream home; you can now have a look at display homes in Australia!

What are display homes?

A display home is a fully constructed home, used by builders and construction companies for the preview of their prospective customers. In other words, if you are trying to find a house that best fits your taste and requirement, you may ask your service providers to show you their display homes in Brisbane or the Sunshine coast. This will be a thoughtful help in your quest for a new home. The preview of these homes will help you make up your mind easily about your idea of ​​an ideal home.

What to expect when inspecting a model home?

When previewing a display home, your focus must be beyond the aesthetic value of the home. Of course, the look of the house matters. It matter how many bedrooms, living rooms and kitchens it has. What is the arrangement of rooms inside the house and how spacious are the corridors and Porches. Neverheless, there are other issues of vital importance like does the building meets the codes of construction specified. Is it safe for you in terms of proper ventilation and no moisture intrusion?

Single Sided Deafness and Tinnitus

Unilateral or single sided deafness and tinnitus occurs when a person is suffering hearing loss in one ear and meets normal hearing in the other ear with no loss. Unfortunately, this condition is usually permanent. A single cause can not be determined but more often the sudden decrease of hearing ability can be caused by trauma, measles, mumps and high fever. It is possible and not all that uncommon for a patient to suffer from tinnitus in the same ear that the deafness occurs. Since tinnitus is difficult to understand and even more difficult to treat, this phenomena is hard to explain. For many, it can be very frustrating that the only thing audible is a constant ringing. The good news is that most treatments for tinnitus are effective regardless of the level of hearing.

If single sided deafness and tinnitus occurs this could be sign of other issues as well. When a person sufferers from both this sometimes means that the individual could have acoustic neuroma. Normally this is assumed until further tests can prove differently. Most doctors refer to acoustic neuromas as Vestibular Schwannomas. This occurs when the Schwann cell begins to cover the vestibular nerve. Most people suffering from this source of single sided deafness and tinnitus report symptoms of dizziness as well as more extreme symptoms of facial numbness and tingling.

If the sunset of tinnitus is caused by trauma to the head or any other neurological disorders then there is a good chance that damage to the auditory tube has occurred. These are extreme cases and require extensive treatments that may include surgery. It is also possible that tinnitus can be caused medication and if this is believed to be the case, consult a physician about stopping the medication. There are a large number of drugs that can cause tinnitus and sometimes just switching to a different brand can cure the tinnitus. There are also some very effective home remedies and exercises for tinnitus you can do that can cure cases of tinnitus.

Another reason for what may seem to be single sided deafness and tinnitus could have been a buildup of wax in the ear canal or auditory tube. This can often lead to complete blockage which will cause the symptoms of single sided deafness. Since there are a large number of reasons that cause tinnitus it is hard to diagnose and treat. Often the sunset of tinnitus could mean that there is another problem in the body. There have been a number of cases where people have been bitten by a tick or other insect this has caused single sided deafness and tinnitus. This occurrence is easy to treat but the diagnosis is often missed. However, there are many reports that once hearing is restored that the tinnitus is still present.

One Stammer Cure That Actually Works

Looking for a stammer cure that actually works? Look no further, I'm going to show you one effective technique to stop your stammer once and for all.

First, I must warn you this is not an instant cure or a secret potion that magically cures your stammer. It also takes a bit of work on your part, and you must have patience and stick with it. Still interested, okay. Here it is.

One Technique to Try in Order to Cure Your Stammer

The reason you stammer is a result of blocks and triggers. Triggers are physical and mental states which cause you to stutter. Many exercises are devoted to avoiding triggers to avoid stuttering. We'll talk about triggers at another time.

Blocks, as you would imagine, are fluency obstacles you encounter when you try to speak. A typical block would be to repeat a particularly troublesome word. This is where the ccc-cat comes into your speech. You repeat "Cah" over and over because it is a block in your fluency. You with me?

Like triggers, if you can identify your blocks you can overcome them and speak more clearly. Here's one exercise to help you increase your blocks. Ready?

Block Busting Stammering Exercise

Step 1:
Read aloud for 1 minute from your favorite book or magazine. Try your best to speak fluently, but do not stress over it. At the end of the minute add up how many words you read. This is your baseline. For example maybe you read 50 words in 1 minute.

Step 2:
Now, re-read the same passage again focusing on reading at a pace which allows you to continue moving forward without major stammering. This may be very slow – do not worry! How many words did you read this time in the 1 minute? It may be less, it may be slightly more. The key is to read at an even pace at a speed which allows you to continue reading without stuttering.

Step 3:
Continue this exercise of reading out loud and counting the words you get through in a minute. Slowly beginning speeding up as you read. Only speed up if you are able to get through the passage without a stammer. Focus on moving forward through the passage and slowly increasing speed over time.

This exercise allows you to work through your block until one day you realize you are able to read more words, in the 1 minute time without stammering at all. Lather, rinse, repeat from there until you are up to a comfortable speaking speed. Make sure you read different paths or different books as you work this exercise.

Eye Exercises for Myopia

Eye exercises for myopia are one of the best ways to reverse and manage your myopia. Myopia, known as nearsightedness, occurs when the parallel light rays from distant objects fail to reach the retina and instead are focused in front of it. Distant objects seem indistinct to myopic people. Nearsighted patients see near objects clearly while they find it difficult to focus on distant objects. The cause of near-sightedness can be genetic or environmental, or more likely, a combination of the two. As you know, there is nothing that you can do about your genes, but you can do plenty about your environment. It means that you have to take care of your eyes and how you use them.

Nearsightedness is usually corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. Myopic people were advised to wear concave corrective lenses to digress the light rays as they enter the eyes; hence, the light converge farther back the eyes. In some cases, a surgery is needed to reshape the curvature of your cornea. But one of the common prescriptions for vision correction is eye strengthening exercises. One great advantage of doing eye exercise to treat myopia is that patients were prevented from incurring possible complications in subscribing to other treatment options. For instance, complications such as corneal ulcer or infection can occur in people who use contact lenses to manage their myopia. In addition to that, you need not to purchase anything to conduct any of these vision improvement therapy.

When you have myopia, it is likely that your eye muscle grew weaker as you became accustomed in using wrong visual skills. As myopia is becoming a common eye disorder nowadays, there arises a rich catalog of exercise routines that can help in controlling myopia. Some of these eye exercises for myopia are instant relaxants that soothe your tense nerves and relieve eye pains and headaches. Just make sure that you do not strain your eyes as you do the exercise.

One common eye exercise for myopia is to roll your eyes in a circle for 1-2 minutes. This simple exercise can be executed by relaxing yourself in a sitting position and rolling your eyes up and down. You can also make your eyes achieve maximum flexibility by allowing them to do a 180-degree horizontal movement. This is particularly applicable if you felt your eyes get exhausted after using them for a long time. As you do the eye rotation, the six large external muscles responsible in controlling where your eyes is aimed were coordinated and restored. Eye exercises like this prevents double vision and eyestrain. This can also improve your eye coordination.

The same effect can be achieved by doing distance perception test. In this eye exercise for myopia, you have to hold a tiny object with your extended arms. Stare for that object for three seconds, then inhale. As you inhale, move the object nearer to your face as it touch the tip of you nose without removing your eyes from it. Move the object back out when you exhale.

Eye Exercises for Nearsightedness

Other eye exercises for shortsightedness or nearsightedness include relaxing methods that could restore your eye efficiency. The “palming” technique, for example, had you shut your eyes and rest them against your palm which you rub together to generate relaxing heat. Keep you eyes shut throughout the exercise and focus on darkness for a moment. Make sure that the cups of your palms rest gently above your eyebrow and below your check bone. As relaxation sets in your eyes, concentrate on blackness and disregard the flashes of colors. An alternative heating tool to your palm is placing a cloth or towel soaked in lukewarm water. This technique can be complemented with “sunning” technique where you train your eyes to focus on bright lights while keeping them close. If you do not have an artificial light, you can use the sun for this exercise.

Do you also know that myopic patients tend to concentrate a lot when staring at a distant object that they forgot to blink? Blinking improves our eyesight as it maintains our eyes cleansed and lubricated so blinking exercise is one effective routine that nearsighted people can execute. For about three to five minutes, you can blink your eyes at a considerable rate. Do this while you are seated comfortably so that you will not feel dizzy afterwards.

Another popular eye exercise for myopia is the use of our imagination to perceive spatial dimension of the objects around us. You see, two-dimensional or flat perception of distant object is very common to myopic patients. So in order to correct such inefficient visual acuity, it is encouraged that you improve your spatial imagination to achieve three-dimensional perception of distant object. Also, you may try eye exercises that enhance your ability to follow fast-moving objects. This can be done by suspending an object at your ceiling and allowing it to swing back-and-forth. As the object moves, you have to follow that object using your eyes.

If you want to attain quick result, you can try eye relaxation massage to eliminate eyestrain at once. You can do this by applying manageable pressure around your eyes using your thumb. Begin at your nose bridge and move your thumb around your eyes and back to the side of your nose. After some movements, you can notice an instant relaxation of the eye muscles. Likewise, acupressure exercises are said to relax the eye muscles. This eye exercise for myopia had you applying pressure at certain point around the eye area.

If it happens that your eyes feel irritated during the exercise, remember that “eye exercises for myopia” are flexible so you can adjust the way you execute the routine to suit your convenience. However, there are those who questioned the efficiency of eye exercises in eliminating such refractive errors. Just note that these exercises were not yet proven to have completely restored optimal vision. What they can do is to reduce your eyestrain so that you can increase the flexibility of your eye muscles. Again, eye exercise for myopia should not replace the treatment of health professionals.

The Risk of a Stroke During Plastic Surgery

An Unspoken Concern

While most plastic surgeons will outline the risks of having an elective surgical procedure performed, very few tend to speak directly to the issues regarding safety and post operative complications. Often, a surgeon will make a general statement regarding the risks of surgery, such as, “All surgery carries risks which includes, bleeding, infection, difficulty breathing, swelling, clotting, and other illnesses in a small percentage of patients,” and then move directly into talking about the benefits of the procedure. Patients need to inform themselves of the actual risks associated with cosmetic surgical procedures, especially the risk of a stroke or cerebral vascular accident (CVA). As a physician, I understand that there is no value in frightening our patients without cause. Yet I still firmly believe that patients should never be too quick to decide on an elective surgical procedure without fully realizing the potential for devastating complications.

Patients and physicians alike need to recognize that most patients who are receiving some sort of cosmetic care are generally considered to be healthy individuals. Thus, neither patient nor physician is necessarily ready for the onset of a complication. This fact alone can make a complication much more serious than if the very same complication arose during a medically necessary procedure. For instance, even during a routine knee surgery, physicians do not see their patients as completely healthy, and are more guarded against the onset of blood clots or other risk factors for stroke.

While the approximated one to two percent of cosmetic surgery patients who will experience a stroke seems like a very limited number of patients, the effects of these strokes can be devastating

Who is at Risk?

Few patients really consider themselves at risk for a possible stroke because they associate the condition as an event that occurs to people over the age of 55. While in some cases age does bear a factor, it is far from the determining factor of a stroke. In fact, a healthy 65-year-old woman can be less likely to have a stroke than a 35-year-old woman who is undergoing invasive cosmetic surgery. Patients should understand the causes of a stroke in a post operative environment in order to assess more realistically their level of risk. However, as a physician I can testify to the fact that sometimes there simply is no way to ascertain why a stroke occurred for one individual and not for another with the same health history, the same risk factors, and the same surgical procedure.

Most post operative strokes occur when a blood clot dislodges, which typically occurs in the lower section of the body. This blood clot then travels through the body and may lodge itself in the brain or more commonly the lungs. This action of a blood clot traveling through the body post surgically is commonly referred to as an embolism and usually arises from a larger blood clot that usually forms in the lower body known as a deep venous thrombosis or “DVT”. DVT is a prime concern for surgeons, and can be considered a precursor to a stroke.

Understanding the Potential Danger

Blood clots generally become trapped in either the lung or the brain when they break free from other parts of the body. When the blood clot becomes caught in a blood vessel in the brain, it results in a CVA or stroke. When it becomes trapped in a blood vessel in the lung it is known as a pulmonary embolism or PE. Either condition is life threatening and can carry serious consequences.

While blood clots and strokes are a significant risk for all patients having any type of invasive surgery, plastic surgeons run into a unique scenario that generally makes it a little more difficult for our patients to get treatment and help in a short amount of time. Incidents of blood clots and stroke can happen anywhere between several hours post operatively up to about ten days after surgery. Thus, these incidents rarely occur within a medical environment and usually happen at home. Patients who remain in the hospital or a medical center after a medically necessary procedure are more likely to have these incidents in the hospital.

Patients, who are going to experience a cosmetic procedure, or any type of surgery for that matter, should familiarize themselves with the general symptoms of post surgical pulmonary embolism or stroke. Symptoms that include shortness of breath, chest pain, disorientation, and sometimes even a sense of altered mental status are likely either to be related to a pulmonary embolism or a stroke. Patients and physicians alike should also understand the basic risk factors for these complications and prior to a surgical procedure. While there are still studies being conducted, which will help determine a patient’s risk level in the future, there are some pretty basic factors, which point to a likely candidate.

Risk Factors For Patients

Women are more likely to experience these types of complications than men, as are smokers. There are numerous medications, which place patients at a higher risk for postoperative blood clots, including but not limited to hormone replacements and birth control pills. Weight plays a significant factor as does the level of activity the patient generally participates in. Patients who generally lead a sedentary lifestyle are at a higher risk. Obese patients are at an even higher risk. Increased age and a previous history of deep venous thrombosis are more obvious risk factors. Patients who have a current diagnosis of cancer are at a particularly high risk.

Reducing the Risk Factors for Safer Surgery

Whenever a patient is booked for surgery in my practice, I always insist that they have a medical clearance by an internist to help determine their general risk level for elective surgery and the possibility of medical complications, which includes the risk of abnormal blood clotting. I also take into consideration the type of surgery that I am performing on the patient. In general, surgical procedures that have a longer operative time and involve body contouring carry a higher risk than those that are minimally invasive and are performed on the head and neck. The internist will review a list of current and recent medications, as I do myself, and will verify that the patient is physically fit to tolerate the procedure that is desired. There are still no guarantees, but knowing a patient’s medical history, their obvious risk factors, and having a second pair of eyes look over the same information that I am presented with, ensures that I am taking all possible precautions.

I also use something known as pneumatic compression boots for every patient undergoing any surgical procedure and I urge other physicians to do so as well. These boots are able to keep the muscles of the lower extremities moving in a fashion similar to walking, which can help prevent blood clots. I insist that my patients carry on an active lifestyle, to help prevent DVT formation and to directly assist with both preoperative and postoperative care. Proper positioning in the operating room allows for additional prevention of blood clot formation as well.

Physicians and patients need to understand that the potential for serious complications related to cosmetic surgery can be devastating. Knowledge is power and education can help reduce the number of blood clots and such rare but devastating complications as strokes that occur after surgery. With current research and education practices, we should be able to reduce the number of post operative strokes and blood clots over the coming years.

Loosing My Hair – Could it Be Alopecia?

There are a lot of factors that cause hair loss. In males, it may be associated with hereditary conditions and male pattern baldness. It may also be stress induced or it could be a side effect of medication. It could also be Alopecia. Alopecia is a medical condition that can affect anyone. It is not contagious. Symptoms usually start early and gradually progress and get worse as the patient gets older. However, there have been rare cases in which the symptom will eventually decrease and disappear.

Causes of Alopecia

At present, there is no known cause of Alopecia. It is speculated that the disease may be hereditary since most people who have it, have relatives who also suffer from the condition. It is also believed to be a form of autoimmune disease. How so? Well, that's because Alopecia occurs when the body's immune system rejects its own hair follicles – that, causing hair to fall out. It has also been observed that Alopecia affects patients with other autoimmune disorders such as SLE (Lupus), Thyroid problems, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and others.

Who is at Risk for Alopecia?

Both men and women suffer from Alopecia. It can affect people from every race and nationality. The disease can also strike at any age – but, most of the time symptoms present themselves in the teenage years. As mentioned, there is evidence that the disease is hereditary. That is why individuals who have relatives with Alopecia are at risk for developing the disease. People who previously suffer from autoimmune conditions also have a chance of developing Alopecia.

Signs / Symptoms and Patterns of Alopecia

Hair loss is the general symptom of Alopecia. The different patterns of hair loss determine what type of alopecia a person has. Alopecia Areata, is a form of Alopecia wherein the patient develops bald spots on the scalp. That is the reason why it is also referred to as Spot Baldness. Diffuse Alopecia on the other hand presents with an even degree of hair loss all over the scalp. Alopecia Barbe referers to spot baldness on beard region and Alopecia Universalis is when a person looses all bodily hair. Early symptoms of Alopecia often include tendness (pain to touch) on the bald spots.

How is Alopecia Diagnosed

Diagnosis of Alopecia often involves a biopsy of the affected scalp tissue. This will determine if the hair fall has been really caused by Alopecia and not by other causes. Another telltale sign of Alopecia is referred to as – Exclamation Point Hair. It means that the strands of the affected hair taper off toward the roots.

Treatment

Since there is no known cause for Alopecia, it has become very difficult to cure. To this day, there is no known cure for the condition. All a patient can do is alleviate the symptoms and help to reverse the hair loss. In this case, common hair loss treatments may be used to re-grow hair. But, a patient must remember that despite the fact that hair is growing back, the treatments can never stop new bald spots from developing. New 'experimental' treatments for alopecia include drugs that subdue the autoimmune system.

Glaucoma Laser Surgery – What is the Procedure For Glaucoma Laser Surgery? – Nurse's Guide

If you've been diagnosed with glaucoma and have been thinking about getting laser surgery as a treatment and are washing what the procedure for glaucoma laser surgery is, I'll explain in this article how it's done.

Laser surgery is used to help control glaucoma. If you're using glaucoma drugs now, either eye drops or oral medications, you may be suffering from the side effects of these drugs. Some of the side effects you may not be aware of. You may want to get off these medicines but are concerned about the buildup of pressure in your eyes.

Glaucoma eye drops do have significant side effects and it's best if you can stop taking them provided you have an alternative and that alternative may be laser surgery. Sometimes glaucoma medications do not work.

Simply- glaucoma is an eye disease of which there are two basic types – primary open angle and acute angle-closure.

There is a clear fluid that flows though the passes of your eye. Sometimes these paths get blocked and the fluid will build up in the eye and cause too much pressure. This pressure can cause damage to the optic nerve and a loss of vision. The result is glaucoma.

Laser surgery uses a tiny but powerful light beam to help drain the fluid from your eye easier. The eye surgeon will make holes or use it to shrink the clogged areas in your eye. This surgery can help you decrease your eye pressure. The surgery may be done on one or both eye. It can affect one eye only.

The surgery is done in your doctors' office or in a clinic. You should be able to see just fine after surgery except you may feel some grittiness in your eye or eyes. Your eyes or eyes may be swollen too. But these symptoms will go away in a day or two. You may have some sensitivity to light and some blurred vision for three weeks or so while your eyes heal. You would still take your eye drops or oral medications during this time period.

Now this is the basic procedure is for glaucoma laser surgery. Your ophthalmologist can fill you in more fully as it applies to your individual eye problem.

It's important to note that any lost vision will not return. This surgery is meant to prevent future loss of vision and help you avoid taking lifetime medications that may be harmful to your body. Laser surgery may not be appropriate for all types of glaucoma but your eye surgeon or ophthalmologist will help determine that. In any case glaucoma laser surgery is a consideration and want to avoid eye drops and seek a better solution.

How to Treat the Pain Associated With Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition caused by inflammation of the thick, fibrous band of tissue ('' fascia '') that reaches the heel to the toes. This fascia is responsible for supporting the muscles and arch of the foot. The plantar fascia is made of three distinct parts: medial, central, and lateral bands. The central band is the thickest and strongest and is most likely involved in plantar fasciitis pain. Tiny tears are created on the surface of the fascia when it's stretched too far causing inflammation and pain. In addition to inflammation and pain, the stress on the muscles and ligaments from plantar fasciitis can cause he spurs. There is not a single treatment for plantar fasciitis, but physical therapy utilizes several tools which can alleviate the pain and inflammation.

Plantar Fasciitis accounts for about 10% of runner related injuries and is more likely to affect women than men. Because of the high incidence rate of plantar fasciitis in runners, the primary cause is believed to be microtrauma from repeated stress.

In normal function, the plantar fascia acts as a shock absorber and support for the arch of the foot. While walking or moving, the plantar fascia is like a spring that simultaneously conserves energy and provides propulsion. Tension increases while the foot is on the ground and is then released during toe-off to help with acceleration.

5 Modalities to Treat the Pain of Plantar Fasciitis

1. Kinesio Tape : Evidence has shown using Kinesio tape is effective alleviating pain and promoting the healing process. The Kinesio tape provides support for the arch allowing the foot to relax, which relieves pressure and the fascia and reduces infection.

2. Cold Compression Therapy : Cold compression therapy combines the benefits of ice which helps decrease pain along with compression which helps decrease edema and swelling. Cold compression therapy is useful when treating acute pain from plantar fasciitis, particularly following any stretching done to the foot during a physical therapy session.

3. Ultrasound Therapy : Using sound waves ultrasound therapy stimulates the tissue benefit the skin's surface. The heating effect of ultrasound therapy aids in increasing blood flow in the plantar fascia which helps reduce swelling and edema, leading to a reduction in pain.

4. Low Level Laser Therapy : Laser therapy applications light (red and infrared) over the plantar fascia. Laser therapy converges light into biochemical energy, which initiates tissue repair in the cells. Additionally the stimulation created by the laser helps reduce pain and decrease inflammation.

5. Therapeutic Stretching : Once the acute pain of plantar fasciitis has been addressed, it becomes important to stretch the calves and feet in order to relieve the pressure on the plantar fascia.

Another one of the primary populations affected by this ailment are those who are overweight. The pain caused by plantar fasciitis makes it difficult for this population to exercise making a cycle of not enough movement but being stopped by prohibitive pain. It's important for people experiencing symptoms for longer than a week to seek treatment from a physical therapist in order to reduce down time and increase the ability to return to normal activities.

For more information about popular physical therapy modalities please visit our blog at ProHealthcareProducts.com/blog.

What Causes Hearing Loss?

Deafness and reduced or absent hearing can be congenital, meaning a child is born with reduced ability to hear. This can range from mild to severe. Severe hearing loss often requires the use of sign language and is beyond the use of a hearing aid. Babies with hearing problems often show delayed development, especially in speech and cognition.

For many people problems with hearing are familiar, meaning that they develop sometimes in life after birth. Sometimes it is hard to find the reason or reasons for an individual's hearing loss. For some people the loss is minimal and for others it is more severe.

There are two main causes for acquired hearing loss and deafness in patients. There are more specific causes within each general category.

Sensor neural hearing loss is quite common. In this type of problem there is damage to nerve transmission of sound somewhere along the pathway from within the inner ear to the brain. It is often called 'nerve deafness'. In the cochlea, which is in the inner ear, there are hair cells that transmit sound impulses to the brain through nerves. Any nerve injury that interferees with this information transfer from the hair cells of the inner ear to the auditory nerve that conducts from the inner ear to the brain causes sensor neural hearing loss.

Some examples of this type of problem include:

Aging – Older people often lose cochlear hair cells which is often responsible for decreased hearing in more senior adults. This can be mild or severe hearing loss. Sometimes the loss is sufficient enough to require a hearing aid.

Acoustic Trauma- This refers to having an injury of some kind to the nervous contracting mechanisms. Very loud noises can damage hair cells in the inner ear. This is why excessive volume for sound producing electronics is so dangerous to hearing. Also ear protection should be worn in noisy environments, such as working in a shop or during hunting.

Infections – Some infections can cause loss of hair cells ie mumps or meningitis. Sensor neural hearing loss does not always show up immediately but usually does not improve once it develops. That development can be gradual over many years, or it can be sudden and acute.

Conductive Hearing Loss

Conductive Hearing loss is basically caused by obstruction in the outer or middle ear which prompts or inhibits sound passing to the inner ear. Many of these causes are acute and can be resolved.

This type can be caused by anything that interferes with the transmission of sound from the outer to the inner ear, such as;

Ear infections are common in children. Hearing typically returns to normal one the infection subsides.

When the ear behind the tympanic membrane (the middle ear) becomes filled with a sticky fluid, often resulting from many reoccurring ear infections, conductive (temporary) reduced hearing occurs, which typically resolves after the fluid is drained.

Wax build up in the ear canal can cause hearing loss, which usually resolves when the wax is removed.

Damage to the small bones in the ear (ossicles) or a perforated ear drum (a hole in the ear drum) can cause reduced hearing that can be permanent. These problems can cause sufficient permanent hearing loss. Some of these problems can improve with the use of a hearing aid. Hearing aids are a choice to help with some chronic hearing loss problems. There are many types and style available to suit most users needs, and can help improve the user's lifestyle. A professional can provide definitive advice about what is suitable for an individual's specific needs.