How to Deal With Glaucoma

Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness, especially among African-Americans over the age of 40, people over the age of 65, and individuals with family history of glaucoma. Usually associated with increased pressure in the eye, it damages the optic nerve and often leads to progressive blindness.

Management of glaucoma as early as possible is the key to preventing blindness from developing. However, in the case of open-angle glaucoma, it is not recognized until the disease has progressed to an advanced stage. With closed-angle glaucoma, the patient usually seeks medical attention as soon as possible due to the sudden eye pain.

The most common and most convenient way to manage glaucoma is through medication in the form of eye drops. Several eye drops are used and the functions are usually to decrease the production of aqueous humor and to increase its outflow leading to decrease in intraocular pressure. Some medications are administrated for short-term and long-term effects so each one is necessary. This requires an effort in the part of the patient since compliance with the regimen is important. According to studies, the blindness among those who are already diagnosed and started medication was changed from non-compliance to home medication.

Beside medication, surgery is also one of the effective managements of glaucoma. It is important to note that surgery does not cure glaucoma. Instead, it only provides symptomatic treatment. To date, there is still no cure for glaucoma.

Trabeculectomy is the conventional surgery for glaucoma patients. This is done by removing a portion of the blocked fluid pathways, making an opening in the sclera of the eye and closing it loosely to function as the new drain of the eye fluid. It is effective in lowering intraocular pressure but may have side effects such as scarring, infection and cataract formation.

Laser trabeculoplasty is a treatment specifically for open-angle glaucoma. The laser stimulates the trabecular meshwork to open and drain fluid more effectively. Laser iridotomy is done by making a hole in the iris of the eye to drain fluid. It is effective among those with closed-angle glaucoma.

Artificial drain may also be implanted in the eye if the response to medication is poor. Another procedure called viscocanalostomy is done by making the front of the eye thinner to help drain the fluid, but this is not as effective as the conventional surgery.

You Can Prevent Stroke

If you've ever witnessed someone suffer a stroke, you understand the humbling nature of this disease. It can reduce the mighty human being to an immobile, helpless creature. Impairment of critical functions like speech, walking, and control of bowel and bladder can wrench control from the body in a moment.

Even perpetually youthful TV personality Dick Clark was stuck down by stroke at age 75, despite the outward appearance of perfect health. Clark's stroke resolved in a six-week hospital stay and, judging from fragmented reports, significant disability. Stroke can be like a devastating fire that strikes without warning, leaving only smoldering rubble. Stroke can so ravage basic bodily functions that often all you can hope for is to regain a portion through rehabilitation.

The disease process that underlies stroke requires decades – 30 or 40 years – to develop. With that much lead time, why are not we better able to detect or stop this crippling disease?

The truth is that we are able to predict many, if not most, strokes. Advances in imaging technology allow detection of atherosclerotic plaque that cause stroke years before it becomes a threat. Progress in deciphering the causes of stroke has also leapt forward.

Unfortunately, your neighborhood physician still focuses on diagnosing the crisis rather than anticipating it. Physicians prefer to deal with catastrophes and are just not that interested in prevention. Most doctors ask: "Is it time to operate or not?" The medical community obsesses over procedures like carotid endarterectomy (surgical removal of plaque) or carotid stents. Even when a person is afforded the warnings of a "mini-stroke", or transient ischemic attack (TIA), little more is done once it's determined that surgery is not necessary – even though this person has high risk for future stroke (50) % over 10 years).

Let's flip-flop this approach to stroke. Procedures represent a failure of prevention!

Where do strokes come from?

Stroke develops when some portion of the brain is deprived of blood. This usually results from a tiny bit of debris that dislodges from an atherosclerotic plaque along the walls of an artery (the same sort that accumulates in coronaries causing heart attack). The sources of debris have been a subject of controversy, but new imaging technologies have settled the question. Any blood vessel that leads from the heart to the brain can be a source. The two carotid arteries on both sides of your neck are a frequent source, as these arteries are pre to develop plaque. (Our discussion will be defined to what are called thromboembolic, or ischemic, strokes, ie, strokes that occurs from plaque that fragments, sending debris to the brain, and will not include the far less common hemorrhagic strokes due to rupture of small vessels in the brain, nor will we discuss atrial fibrillation and other heart causes of stroke.

Over the last 10 years, the aorta has been recognized as another important source of stroke. The aorta is the main artery of the body which branches go to the head, arms, and legs.

Atherosclerotic plaque is a live tissue that, through poor diet ,activity, high cholesterol, overweight, etc., grows and becomes progressively more unstable. At some point, plaque fragments. Little bits break away, traveling to the brain. Fractured plaque also poses its detrimental structures to flowing blood, triggering blood clot formation, which in turn can also fragment and go to the brain. Atherosclerotic plaque is a prerequisite for the most common causes of stroke.

If the majority of strokes originate from plaque, why not measure plaque to determine if you're at risk for stroke? How can we easily, safely, and accurately measure plaque in the carotid arteries and aorta? And if plaque can be measured, can it be shrunk or inactivated to reduce or eliminate risk for stroke?

How can plaque be measured?

Just 20 years ago, the only practical method of identifying plaque in the carotids or aorta was through angiography, requiring catheters inserted into the body to inject x-ray dye. Angiography was impractical as a screening measure.

CT scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are emerging as exciting methods of imaging both carotids and aorta. Unfortunately, most centers and physicians are much more focused on the diagnostic uses of these technologies for people who have already suffered stroke or other catastrophe, and application of these devices for preventive uses is still evolving. One exception is when aortic calcification or aortic enlargement is incidentally noted on the increasingly popular CT heart scans; This is an important finding that can signal presence of aortic plaque.

The one test that is broadly available and can be performed in just about any center is carotid ultrasound. It's simple, painless, and precise. Two basic observations can be made:

1. Plaque detection – Atherosclerotic plaque can be clearly visualized. If plaque blocks more than 70% of the diameter of the vessel, or if there are "soft" (unstable) elements in plaque, then stroke risk may be high enough to justify surgery or stents. However, if there are plaques that are less severe, substantial risk for stroke may still be present that can be reduced with preventive measures.
2. Carotid intimal-medial thickness – This is a measure of the thickness of the lining of the carotid artery in areas not involved by plaque, but often precedes the development of mature plaque. Carotid intimal-medial thickness also provides an index of body-wide potential for atherosclerotic plaque that can place you at risk for stroke. The aorta, for instance, can not be well imagined by surface ultrasound but can still be a source for stroke. Increased carotid intimal-medial thickness and carotid plaque are closely associated with likelihood of aortic plaque. The Rotterdam Study of 4000 participants demonstrated that if carotid intimal-medial thickness is greater than normal (1.0 mm), then you can be at risk for stroke (and heart attack), even if no carotid plaques are detected.

Carotid ultrasound is the one test you should consider that provides the most information with least effort. Ultrasound is harmless, painless, and can be obtained just about anywhere. Even if your doctor disagrees with your request for a carotid ultrasound, an increasing number of mobile services are popping up nationwide that make this test available for around $ 100. One important point: many scanners and interpreters will only report whether plaque is present or not. While this is important information, you should request that the carotid-intimal medial thickness be made as well. Not all centers can make this simple measure (because of software requirements), but it does not hurt to try. Any amount of carotid plaque is reason to follow a preventive program, even if the plaque is insufficient to justify surgery.

Can plaque be reduced?

Can we shrink plaque in carotid arteries and aorta and thenby reduce, possibly eliminate, these sources of stroke? That question is gaining momentum as effective therapies become available that pack real punch for reducing plaque.

Study after study has now documented that plaque can be reduced and, with it, risk for stroke. Reduction in plaque of 10-20% is possible within a year or two. Let's consider the most potent effects on carotid and aortic plaque growth that need to be considered in a plaque-reducing program. (I assume that you are a non-smoker – if you are a smoker, you first need to concentrate on quitting.)

Hypertension

Considerable experience documents the power of blood pressure-lowering for prevention of stroke. The most recently updated guidelines, the JNC-VII, recommends a blood pressure of Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Hyperinsulinemia

Just being overweight increases the risk of stroke. A Swedish study in 7400 obese men had double the risk of stroke compared to non-obese men. Increased body weight leads to diabetes and its close relationships, metabolic syndrome and hyperinsulinemia (increased insulin levels), which play an overwhelmingly important role in increasing stroke risk. Of people who suffer strokes, a shocking 70% have one of these diagnoses. When diabetes is present, risk for stroke can be as much as six-fold higher.

Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, predecessors of diabetes, are far more common than full-blown diabetes. Metabolic syndrome consists of excessive abdominal fat, high blood pressure, low HDL cholesterol, increased triglycerides, and resistance to insulin. Metabolic syndrome is rampant through the US, afflicting one of three adults due to sedentary lifestyles, processed foods, and overweight. High insulin levels and resistance to insulin are powerful drivers of plaque growth, and carotid plaque grows faster. Judging from the rapid escalation of precalence of metabolic syndrome and diabetes in the population, it is likely that an epidemic of stroke is in our country's future.

LipoproteinsSMall LDL, IDL, and Lipoprotein (a)

More than high cholesterol, various lipoprotein abnormalities carry greater risk for carotid and aortic plaque growth and stroke. Lipoproteins are fat-carrying proteins in blood that cause plaque growth. Patterns which are instigators of plaque growth and stroke include:
o Small LDL particlesSMall LDL particles cause carotid plaque growth more than large LDL particles. This abnormality also triples heart attack risk.
o Intermediate-density lipoproteins (IDL) These triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (present even when triglycerides are low) are a measure of how effectively you clear fat from blood after a meal. IDL is a potent driver of carotid plaque growth. Increased IDL also creates fat-rich plaque that makes it more prone to fragment.
o Lipoprotein (a) This underappreciated lipoprotein is associated with heightened risk of stroke and heart attack by promoting blood clotting, constricting arteries, and increasing dangers of cholesterol. Carotid ultrasound studies have shown that lipoprotein (a) causes accelerated plaque growth.

Fibrinogen

This blood clotting protein not only causes carotid plaque growth, but also contributes to formation of unstable plaques, ones that have more inflammatory cells and a thinner tissue covering, making plaque more rupture-prone. An Oxford University analysis of 5000 participants confirmed the role of fibrinogen in increasing stroke risk. Fibrinogen levels> 407 mg / dl heightens stroke risk six-fold.

C-reactive protein (CRP)

This measure of pollution is proving to be a useful marker for identifying people at risk for stroke, with increased risk beginning at a level of 0.5 mg / l. High CRP also precedes more rapidly growing carotid plaque.

Homocysteine

Homocysteine ​​is an important marker of increased likelihood of both carotid and aortic plaque, as well as stroke. In 1997, the European Concected Action Project reported more than a doubling of stroke when homocysteine ​​levels exceeded 12 mol / l. As homocysteine ​​increases to 20 μmol / l, risk for stroke and heart attack increases an amazing 10-fold over that at a level of 9 μmol / l.

Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)

ADMA is recently discovered amino acid which blood levels can skyrocket up to 10-fold in the presence of hypertensive, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, high cholesterol and triglycerides, obesity, and high homocysteine ​​levels. ADMA blocks the action of the amino acid, l-arginine. This mimicry reduces the availability of nitric oxide, a powerful dilator and protector of arteries. ADMA levels in the top 10% predict a six-fold heightened risk for future stroke, and ADMA levels in people with strokes are double that in other people. A carotid ultrasound study in 116 subjects showed that higher blood levels of ADMA are associated with more severe carotid plaque. Because of ADMA's shared role across a variety of abnormal conditions, correction or blocking the action of the ADMA has been proposed as a unique therapeutic tool to reduce stroke risk.

Cholesterol

Data suggest that lowering cholesterol with statin cholesterol-lowering drugs slows carotid plaque growth and reduce stroke risk approximately 22%. An interesting study from the Cardiovascular Institute at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York using the precursor measuring ability of MRI of the carotids and thoracic aorta shown an impressive 20% regression of plaque area with simvastatin (Zocor®) taken for two years.

Although guidelines for cholesterol treatment recommend reduction of LDL cholesterol to 100 mg / dl in high-risk persons, a report from the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, showed that carotid plaque was more effectively reduced when LDL cholesterol of 70 mg / dl or lower was achieved with statin cholesterol drugs. Lower LDL cholesterol may, therefore, be better.

Treatment Strategies to Reduce Carotid and Aortic Plaque

The essential question: How do we reduce carotid and aortic plaque? If we make this the focus of our efforts, many pieces begin to fall into place. If you've had any measure of carotid or aortic plaque such as a carotid ultrasound or aortic calcification on a CT heart scan, you know that you're at increased risk for stroke. You also have a baseline for future comparison to gauge whether your program is working or not.

Because most people have not one but multiple causes of carotid and aortic plaque, there is no one single treatment that effectively eliminates risk for stroke. Instead, most people require a comprehensive program of healthy diet, exercise, supplements, and medication when indicated. Here, we focus on the nutritional supplements that can be critical components of your plaque-reduction program.

Fish oil

Fish oil is a cornerstone of your stroke prevention program. Epidemiological observations suggest a strong relationship of fish intake and reduction of stroke risk. Carotid ultrasound studies demonstrate less carotid plaque with greater intakes of fish.

A cleverly designed University of Southampton study made the fascinating observation that fish oil transforms the structure of carotid plaque. 150 people with severe carotid plaque scheduled for carotid endarterectomy (surgical removal of the plaque) were given fish oil, sunflower oil, or no treatment over several months while waiting for their procedure. (Delays in the British health system permitted this unique design.) Plaque was removed at surgery and examined. Participants taking fish oil had reduced inflammation in plaque and thicker tissue covering the fatty core, marks of more stable plaque. Those taking sunflower oil or no treatment had unstable plaques with greater pollution and thinner, less sturdy covering tissue. This suggests that fish oil stabilizes carotid plaque, making it less likely to rupture and fragment.

A standard capsule of fish oil (containing 300 mg of EPA + DHA) contains the same amount of omega-3s as a 3 oz serving of cod or halibut; three capsules (900 mg DHA + EPA) contain the equivalent of a serving of farm-raised salmon. The dose that sees to provide greatest protection from stroke, lowers triglycerides (that form abnormal lipoproteins; see above), and reduces fibrinogen, is four capsules per day (1200 mg EPA + DHA).

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)

Although there are no data specifically addressing whether CoQ10 reduces plaque, it is a marvelously effective way to reduce blood pressure, one of the critical factors causing carotid and aortic plaque growth. A pooled analysis of eight studies showed that, on average, CoQ10 in daily doses of 50-200 mg reduced systolic blood pressure by 16 mm Hg, diastolic pressure by 10 mm Hg. Data suggest that CoQ10 can reverse abnormal heart muscle thickening (hypertrophy), another manifestation of high blood pressure, strongly suggesting that CoQ10 has benefits beyond just reducing pressure.

Supplements to correct the metabolic syndrome

Weight loss is, without question, the most immediate and direct path to correction of this dangerous pre-diabetic condition. A drop of even 10-20 lbs yields improvements across the board: increased susceptibility to insulin, increased HDL, and reductions in triglycerides, CRP, fibrinogen, small LDL particles, and blood pressure. Diet and exercise are fundamental components of an effort to lose weight; low carbohydrate or reduced glycemic index diets (eg, South Beach or Mediterranean) rich in fibers are clearly effective. Several supplements can amplify weight-reduction efforts and be useful adjustments to your lifestyle program. Among them:

White bean extract
White bean extract blocks intestinal absorption of carbohydrates by 66%. 1500 mg twice a day with meals yields, on average, 3-7 lbs of weight loss in the first month of use. The only side-effect is excess gas, due to unabsorbed starches.

Glucomannan
This unique fiber taken prior to meals absorbs many times its weight in water and thebyfill fills your stomach. You inevitably take in less food. Most people lose around four lbs per month using 1500 mg prior to each meal. Interestingly, glucomannan also blunts the rise in blood sugar after meals, an effect that, by itself, may lead to weight loss. Be sure to take with plenty of water.

DHEA
This adrenal hormone is key to maintaining physical stamina, mood, muscle mass in men, and libido in women. A recent randomized, placebo-controlled study at Washington University in 56 subjects showed a 13% decline in abdominal fat (fat that drives resistance to insulin) measured by MRI with 50 mg of DHEA per day at bedtime, along with improved sugar control and lower insulin levels.

Pectin, beta-glucan
Pectin is the soluble fiber in citrus rinds, green vegetables, and apples, also available as a supplement. Beta-glucan is the soluble fiber of oats and is also available as a supplement. Both are wonderful fibers that provide feelings of fullness, lower cholesterol, slow release of sugars, and can yield modest weight reduction. A USC study in 573 subjects using carotid ultrasound shown that greater intake of healthy fibers like pectin and beta-glucan is associated with less carotid plaque growth.

Folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12
Dr. Daniel Hackam at the Stroke Prevention and Atherosclerosis Research Center in Ontario conducted a study using carotid ultrasound in 101 participants treated with folic acid 2.5 mg, vitamin B6 25 mg, and B12 250 mcg per day. Treatment resulated in plaque reduction, especially when homocysteine ​​levels exceeded 14μmol / l at the start, compared to untreated participants who experienced substantive plaque growth.

An attempt to clarify the role of homocysteine ​​treatment was made through a National Institute of Health-sponsored study of stroke prevention. 3680 participants with a prior history of stroke were controlled and given either a "low-dose" (20 mcg folic acid, 0.2 mg B6, 6 mcg B12) or a "high-dose" (2.5 mg folic acid, 25 mg B6, 400 mcg B12) regimen. Although starting homocysteine ​​levels shown a graduated association with stroke risk (higher homocysteine ​​levels predicted greater stroke risk), the treatment groups experienced, on average, only a 2 μmol drop in homocysteine ​​levels and no reduction in stroke risk over two years. The study investigators as well as critics have suggested that the study failed due to an inadequate treatment period and that the doses were too low. (The doses we use in our plaque reduction program are folic acid 2.5-5.0 mg, B6 50-100 mg, B12 1000-2500 mcg.)

L-arginine
L-arginine can be used to overpower the adverse effects of ADMA. L-arginine is emerging as an important carotid plaque-reversing tool. Early reports in animals showed that l-arginine completely halved growth of aortic plaque, and did so more effectively than lovastatin (a cholesterol-lowering drug).

In humans, L-arginine reduces blood pressure, abnormal constriction of carotid and coronary arteries, blocks entry of inflammatory cells into plaque, increases sensitivity to insulin, and heightens exercise capacity. Following coronary angioplasty or stent placement, l-arginine results in up to 36% reduction in plaque growth.

The average American takes in 5400 mg of l-arginine through food every day. Supplementing with doses of 3000-12,000 mg per day has proven useful to correct many of these phenomena. (We use a dose of 6000 mg of l-arginine powder, twice a day on an empty stomach, dissolved in water, for our plaque regression program.) Does this result in a reduction of stroke risk? The emerging data suggest that l-arginine is likely to exert a powerful plaque-reducing and stroke-preventing benefit, but we await more clinical trial data.

Conclusion

Reducing stroke risk by reversing carotid and aortic plaque is becoming an everyday reality, with better tools becoming available. To know whether you're at risk, the best and most available imaging tool is carotid ultrasound, aiming to identify intimal-medial thickness> 1.0 mm, or carotid plaque. Any degree of calcification of the aorta, such as on a CT heart scan, is another useful measure of risk.

Treatment to reduce risk is multi-faceted but is based on examining all your sources of risk, including metabolic syndrome, small LDL, lipoprotein (a), and C-reactive protein. Fish oil is the one absolutely critical ingredient in any stroke prevention program. Other supplements can be used in a targeted fashion, depending on the causes identified for your carotid or aortic plaque. Ideally, repeat scanning of your carotids should be done once after your program has begun to assess whether you've successfully achieved reversal of plaque growth.

3 Business Opportunities As an RN Wellness Coach

As an RN or nurse, you are in a great position with expert knowledge and access to the healthcare systems that becoming a health and wellness coach should be a career choice to consider.

Here's 3 business opportunities for nurses have when considering a career as an health and wellness coach.

  • Work from home – This is a great opportunity for nurses to work from home, owning their own business as an RN wellness coach. When you participate in most health and wellness training programs they will also teach about marketing your business. This should be enough to get you started and if you need help here feel free to contact me, I'd be happy to help.
  • Work with other health care practices – Look for business opportunities in massage clinics, chiropractic services and therapy centers. Many health and fitness centers are also looking to hire RN health coaches as an added service for being a member of the club for a total health and wellness experience for their clients.
  • Work in the Corporate world – Big name businesses are now hiring their own wellness coaches as a means to help manage health care costs as well as lower the absent rate among their employees. This is an opportunity for nurses in work in the corporate world helping CEOs live a healthy lifestyle.

You could also do this on a part time basis to supplement your current income or to "test out the waters" to see if becoming an RN health and wellness coach is for you. The business opportunities are there for nurses to become successful RN health and wellness coaches.

Full Cranial Prosthesis Aka Full Lace Wigs – A Solution to Alopecia!

Full Cranial Prosthesis aka Full Lace wigs are the latest development in hair replacement units, and are designed to meet the specific needs of any women suffering from long term, or permanent hair loss to medical conditions. Androgenic alopecia and traumatic alopecia are one of the most common medical cause of hair loss in women.

– Androgenic alopecia is an hereditary hair thinning, and occurs in both men and women.

However, it is the most common form of alopecia in women. It can begin as early as in the 20s. By age 40, 40% of these women have noticeable hair thinning due to this condition. By age 50, 60% of them have severe signs of hair loss. When this type of hair loss occurs, women usually do not develop true baldness in the patterns that occur in men, as the areas affected are in the difficulties and the crown of the head, while the front hairline is usually preserved.

– Traumatic alopecia is a form of hair loss due to scarring of the scalp area. This form of hair loss frequently occurs in African-American women.

Traumatic alopecia is divided into three categories: traction, chemical and follicular alopecia.

Traction alopecia:

Hair loss associated with persistent use of tight braids, hair rollers, weaves, twist, locks, or cornrows. The first sign of traction alopecia is thinning above the ears and the forehead. This hair loss is often seen in young girls. Partial or complete regrowth of hair can follow, but permanent loss of hair can occur when the roots of the hairs are severely damaged.

Chemical alopecia:

Damage to the scalp and hair shaft caused by commercial chemical products, like relaxers. It resemble hair thinning resulting from hereditary causes, but also include scarring of the scalp, which can irreversibly damage the hair follicles.

Follicular alopecia:

Gradual destruction of hair follicles by the excessive use of pomades with a hot comb or iron. Thinning usually begins at the crown and then spreads evenly through the head. It is an irreversible condition.

Full Cranial Prosthesis aka Full Lace Wigs are an excellent solution to restore self confidence in women suffering from any type of Alopecia, as they are designed and constructed to be the closest thing to one own real hair.

It is the most beautiful, natural hair replacement system imaginable. They are actually undetectable because they are constructed with a gauze-like lace material which makes it comfortable for extended wear. The hairline is secured with skin liquid adhesive or / and tape. When the lace is bonded to one own hairline, it creates an invisible hairline, making it look as though the hair is growing out of one own scalp. The hair of those unit are usually made of a 100% human hair, tied one strand at a time into that lace base. The gauze-like lace fabric used for the cap construction of that hair system is very sheer, so that it takes on, the approximate color of the wearer own natural scalp, provides proper ventilation while worn, and eliminates heat and moisture build-up.

Full Cranial Prosthesis aka Full Lace Wigs, are lightweight, ultra comfortable and undetectable! They look so natural, that even from a few inches away, it seems that the hair is growing out of one own scalp. This new and revolutionary hair replacement system can be worn for days or even weeks at a time. the hair can be colored, permed, washed, blown-dry, curled with a curling iron and style any way one like. They are so versatile, that they can be parted anywhere on the head, worn in a high ponytail, braided in cornrows, worn in an up do or any style chosen.

Nutrition and Stroke Patients

Nutrition augments stroke treatment and must be administrated accordingly by the caregiver and stroke patient's family. According to research, nutrition affects the course and outcome of a stroke patient's life and recovery.

A study conducted by Salah Gariballa of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom notes that, "stroke patients are highly dependent on others for their nutritional requirements being met. Many are undernourished prior to the stroke and their nutritional status declines further in the hospital" .

Gariballa's research showed that due to poor diet provided to stroke patients, they become susceptible to diseases such as urinary tract infections, undernutrition, dehydration, among others.

A great way to avoid these from happening would be to undertake considering measures such as:

1. Get a reputable nutritionist – the first thing family members and caregivers of stroke patients should do to get a reputable nutritionist to identify what diet should be complied with. This ensures tailor-fitting meals that will help the stroke patient recover physical and mental strength to adapt to the various treatments, as well as absorb learning where applicable.

2. Subscribe to a health and wellness food magazine – exposure is one of the best ways to adapt to change. If the patient used to love unhealthy food it is relevant then to immerse him or her to literature that will boost the desire for healthy food. This is also a great way to improve memory and reorient the patient in relearning various topics, especially since food magazines are typically very visual and can pose as a great activity for learning images.

3. Watch cooking shows for the health-conscious – if food magazines are not available, find useful purpose for the television through cooking shows the inspire consumption of good food and health habits.

4. Encourage everyone to adapt to the new health lifestyle – any endeavor, to be effective, requires conscious group effort. The same goes to having a healthy lifestyle for the patient. This must be supported by family and friends – the best way of showing support is eating nutritious food yourself.

5. Enjoy the food together – there's no better way to enjoy good nutritious food than eating it with loved ones. Boost the patient's gusto for food by joining them in their meals.

Proper and good nutrition augments stroke treatment as it provides the necessary antioxidants and components for the body to recover from the deficiencies of stroke. It is the role of caregivers and family members to ensure the stroke patient gets the nutrition needed as the latter is solely dependent on the former for this.

Epileptic Seizure Solution

Being a very unpredictable disease, epilepsy frequently rules the lives of those attacked by it. The solitary way to maintain control over symptoms is by using assorted combinations of anti-convulsive drugs and developing a well-balanced style of living that keeps excesses of all sorts away.

Mysoline, is an anti-convulsive drug that stops seizures triggered by epilepsy. This form of long-term treatment can be taken for an indefinite period of time. However long you keep taking it, be absolutely sure a close contact with your doctor is maintained for a professional monitoring of your condition.

Treatment Specifics

This medication should be administered as suspension or capsules, and quantity depends on the intensity of the problem, body weight and age. If you choose Mysoline in liquid form, keep it in a dark location and vigorously shake the bottle prior to every usage to ascertain you get the accurate amount.

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. If it is within 1 hour of your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once.

Warnings

The only health circumstance that is totally mismated is porphyria, an inherited metabolic disorder.

At the conclusion of treatment, never discontinue taking this medication abruptly, as this may contribute to stronger seizures than you've experienced previously. Withdrawal must be a gradual process.

Taking into consideration the fact that this drug is, for the most part, administrated for an eminently
long period of time, intermittent blood tests are imperative to maintain an accurate view of your health condition, and to inhibit any possible system decline in quality.

Beware of drug interactions

Prior to beginning any new drug therapy, make sure it does not interject with this medication.Or you risk to jeopardize the effectiveness of either. Medications that are susceptible to Mysoline incumbrance include: estrogen based oral contraceptives, certain antibiotics, blood-thinning drugs, anti-depressants and steroidal drugs

On that account, try to abstain from all alcoholic drinks while using this medication. In order to circumvent possible unwanted side effects, it is important to inform your health care provider on the use of this drug.

There are an abundance of other drugs that can be safely mixed with Mysoline without triggering any negative effects. Your doctor is the most qualified person to talk to when needing to interpret other asserted health problems that inevitably appear.

Use this medication exactly as prescribed. Do not change from one manufacturer's product to another without consulting your doctor.

Continue taking Mysoline even if you feel well. Do not miss any doses.

Mysoline gives you the effectiveness of phenobarbital plus additional protection. A patient who seizures have not been controlled by phenobarbital may have better results from Mysoline.

study in children-which also included Depakote (valproate) -focused on the rate of side effects. Only 8% of the children who were given Mysoline had to stop taking it because of side effects. Phenobarbital, which can be an excellent medication, often is avoided in children because of the possibility of mental slowing. By using Mysoline alone, children can enjoy many of the same benefits while avoiding this problem because the amount of phenobarbital produced by breaking down the Mysoline is low.

It is important to remember that no single combination of antiepileptic medications is perfect for everyone. Sometimes, a series of combinations must be tried before finding what is best for the individual patient.

Does Stuttering Have Something to Do With Intelligence?

Does stuttering have something to do with intelligence? This is one of the most ellogical questions occupying the minds of most of the non-stutterers. And the answer to such a question is a definite no. Stuttering is only a speech hindering disorder which causes the sufferers to stammer when they speak. Being a speech disorder, stuttering has no connection whatsever to intelligence and intellect. Although some may argue that the neural patterns of stutterers differ from those of non-stutterers, the neurons are responsible for hearing and speech are in no way related to the neurons liable for intelligence.

The notion of comparing stuttering to intelligence is in itself erroneous because the intelligence of a person is measured through the IQ or Intelligence Quotient. The IQ of a person depends large on the ability of a person to help new things and learn stuff quickly. But the neurons responsible for determining one's IQ is present in the frontal cortex whereas the ones responsible for hearing and speech are present at the posterior and this clearly shows that one can in no way affect the other.

Although scientifically there is no connection between intelligence and stuttering, the intelligence of a stuttering individual can deteriorate because of the problem. This is largely based on how the stuttering kids were treated in their surroundings. Stutterers are generally made fun of and are never given a chance to show their prowess. Although the society considers them to be disabled in a way, it denies them the compassion which is usually shown towards disabled people. Where concessions are made for other disabled, the stutterers are either given the concessions nor are they treated with concern and even worse are the taunts pointed at them.

Even though some stutterers have been able to successfully overtake the taunts and displayed their intelligence, they have not been able to showcase their abilities because of the society's indifference to them. On top of that, the society has created a view around them depicting them as a dull lot, giving the world an impression that they are not as intelligent as other people. But one proving point to show that there can be no link between stuttering and intelligence is the number of famous successful people including Sir Winston Churchill, King George VI, etc., who have provoked their astuteness in spite of their stutter.

Mushroom Spawn Making – How to Make Your Own Mushroom Spawn

One of the best things about growing mushrooms is that when you have started to grow them you can continue to grow them for years and years without the need to purchase any more mushroom spawn. It is very simple to create your own spawn and be able to store this in a fridge ready to use for several weeks.

Mushroom spawn is simply some kind of food which has mycelium growing through it. The food is usually some kind of bird seed such as corn or rye grain, and this is used because the mycelium loves to grow through it and because of the shape and small size of the grain it provides many innoculation points (it has a large surface area which means you have more chance of the mycelium “leaping off” and growing through your substrate).

Creating your own mushroom spawn can be a very easy process when you know exactly how its done and when you are aware of the possible problems caused by contaminations (which is why it is very important to have good sterile procedures). To make your own spawn you firstly need your own mushroom spores. Take a mushroom and leave it on a piece of foil to leave a spore print. Next you add a little distilled water to this print (a few millilitres) and mix this solution using something called an innoculation loop (small piece of wire with a metal curve in one end). This will mix the spores with the water. Next you need to use a syringe and suck up this solution. As mentioned before its important that the syringe is clean and any other equipment too.

You can store this spore syringe in a cool place such as a refrigerator until ready to use. Next you will need to get a large jar and fill it up with the chosen grain (such as Rye grain). Place a piece of tyvek over the cover and seal with a metal lid. It helps if you drill 4 small holes in the lid (near the corners) which are used as innoculation points later.

When you are ready take the spore syringe and inject a few millilitres of your solution into the 4 holes in the lid of the jar. Usually one syringe can innoculate around 5 jars. When complete, place the jars in a warm place and after about 4 weeks your contents will have colonised and mushrooms will start to form! Or you could simply use this colonised jar of grain and use it as spawn – the choice is yours. You could even multiply the spawn and turn the 5 jars into as many as 25! This is simply done by getting more jars of grain and mixing in part of the colonised spawn jar with the others. One jar can turn into 10 if done properly!

The Infusion Pump Is Easily Taken for Granted

Let’s take a moment to sing the praises of the infusion pump. Yes, yes, it does seem like a rather mundane topic to get excited about. But consider our ability to feed, hydrate, and deliver medicines and solutions to the human body intravenously. Ponder for a second how great a step forward it was for mankind to develop the means to inject life-giving, life-preserving fluids into the blood stream.

A Brief History

The use of a syringe was first recorded during the time of the Romans by a gentleman named Celsus. Celsus wrote on many different subjects, but one of his works was a medical manual in which he tells of the use of a “piston” syringe to treat medical “complications.”

In 1650, French physicist Blaise Pascal invented the first “modern” syringe. He had been studying the principles surrounding the transmission of fluids using pressure, and from this came the syringe and a host of other inventions including hydraulics.

Intravenous (IV) infusion was first recorded as being attempted in the late 1400’s. But it wasn’t until the 1650’s where physicist Robert Boyle and architect Christopher Wren first started giving intravenous injections to animals. They had been experimenting with transfusions and IV infusion along with several other prominent physicians for a few years. One of those physicians was Richard Lower, who is said to have performed the first successful blood transfusion in around 1667. But Christopher Wren gets the historical credit for creating the first working IV infusion device in the late 1650’s.

Over the next 150 years-or-so, the process of IV infusion was slowly refined. Soon after the first transfusions were performed, they were banned in England, France, and Italy due to a number of deaths that resulted from them.

There were many failures with this early medical equipment, yet many discoveries and inventions were born out of those failures; the science of bacteriology, for instance. Better sterilization techniques and smaller, more effective needles were also generated during this period.

In the early 1830’s, Dr. Thomas Latta administered saline solution intravenously to Cholera patients on a large scale. He is said to have, for the most part, pioneered the process. Things only progressed from there, especially during the World War years which, out of necessity, spurred many advances in the delivery of blood and medicine through intravenous infusion. Needles and tubing were modified, and in the 1950’s, bottles were replaced with plastic bags.

The Infusion Pump

Another development in IV infusion technology was beginning to bubble up in the 1950’s. Interest was growing in the development of an “automated” bedside IV infusion system, mainly for use in operating rooms and intensive care units. The goal was to produce a machine or “pump” system that would automatically regulate the timing, volume, and dosage of medicines, fluids, and blood products administered to a patient.

A system like this would be much more efficient. It would save countless man-hours where nurses and doctors would not have to continuously give shots, personally administer IV’s, or do as much monitoring, and it would also allow great flexibility in the amount or volume of substance being delivered. These were just a few of the many advantages that the infusion pump offered.

The first infusion pump was developed and built by SigmaMotor, Inc., and the pumps started shipping in 1961. Due to a few early snags, the pumps were redesigned several times. But SigmaMotor (later just Sigma) built and sold thousands of units in the early-to-mid ’60’s, and a giant leap in medical technology and overall healthcare had begun to take hold.

The infusion pump has positively affected humanity in immeasurable ways. Countless medical supply companies, such as Alaris (Medsystem III), Baxter, Curlin, Hospira, and Smiths Medical, just to name a handful, carry IV supplies and a wide variety of infusion pumps, both new and refurbished.

Today, this mechanical “medical miracle” is a standard piece of equipment. Of course there have been many “offshoots” and variations to the infusion pump; the latest being portable and disposable devices… and the evolution continues.

Symptoms of Swine Flu

Have you or someone you know got Swine Flu? Would you know if they had it? Would you know what to do about it? You would have to be living on the moon to not have heard about Swine Flu, this potentially fatal flu has seen people panic, become fearful, paranoid and more. The best course of action to take of course is to get to know about it, become familiar (theoretically of course) with the flu's symptoms.

Symptoms Of Swine Flu

We know that flu (or influenza is the generic name) and that there are variants. The good news however is that broad speaking speaking all flu's exhibit similar symptoms. Well, I say good news, because it can be bad news too, or in the very least makes differentiation difficult.

Common to all flu's fever, often with a body temperature exceeding 100 Fahrenheit or 38 Celsius. Other common symptoms include fatigue, a feeling of weakness, loss of appetite and possibly coughing and most certainly a loss of motivation to do simple tasks.

Other symptoms of swine flu can be; sore throat, diarrhea, sickness and nasal excretion.

You see, I told you the symptoms are similar to "regular flu", the bottom line and most prudent action is to get you or anyone you know who has swine flu symptoms [http://thehomebusinessventure.com/swineflu.html] is to get checked out by a doctor.

At the first sign of symptoms you really must get a medical professional's opinion, write the symptoms down a piece of paper, in addition to when they first appeared. It's imperative you do so as if pneumonia sets in you could be in real trouble – Pneumonia is a complication you just do not want.

Gingivitis Treat it Naturally With Homeopathy

I love those "itis" diseases. You know, the ones that place "itis" after the noun that determines the location of the disease. Since it is means "inflammation of", it's easy to determine the disease. Tendonitis = inflammation of the tendons. Tonsillitis = inflammation of the tonsils. Here, gingivitis = inflammation of the gingiva. By breaking down the word into its components, it not only gives us information, but comfort in knowing that the disease is often not as serious as it sounds.

So it is with gingivitis. Generally, it is not a disease of severity in our world today. There are, however, varying degrees of severity. If it's a mild case, then herbs can be curative.

One of the easiest ways to treat gingivitis is with Myrrh. Yes, the gift given by the king at Jesus' birth. That in itself has value in my book. Another important ingredient is Propolis, which is found in honey. Both are available in high quality toothpaste purchased from a reputable health food store. Having said this, in my estimation, it's always better to make what ever you can at home. (No hidden ingredients for the sake of shelf life or economy.) If you choose this path, both of these herbs can be purchased in tincture form, again from a health food store. Place 10 drops of each in a glass of water, then swish in the mouth 2-3 times per day, more often if the problem is severe.

So, local measures of treatment are important. However, if the gingivitis is of an ulcerative nature with severe erosion and halitosis, the problem needs to be approached with a greater degree of person-specific treatment. Homeopathic remedies have repeated success in treating this bacterial infection without antibiotics. Let's see what is available.

The key homeopathic remedy for gingivitis is Mercurius sol 30. This is of particular value when the tongue is heavily covered. It should be taken thrice daily for one week. Then one week off and then resumed again the following week. Alternate weeks on and off until results are complete, but no longer than over a period of 2 months. If the tongue is not covered, then use Nitricum acidum 30 thrice daily in the same fashion.

If improvement is noted, but is not complete, it is best to contact a homeopath for an in person or phone appointment. Homeopathy has the ability to address even the most severe cases of mouth disease. It is safe, gentle, effective and carries no side effects. The next time your mouth speaks of illness, consider homeopathy; the world accepted medicine worth spreading the word about.

Natural Myopia Cure – How to Cure Myopia Without Surgery

Myopia is a nearsighted condition where the eyes have become accustomed to near object and thus sees objects that are far away in a blurred manner. There are many ways people can try to find a myopia cure. One of the most common ways people choose to cure it is through glasses or surgery. Even though these are common, they may not necessarily be for everyone.

Glasses can be bothersome and sometimes expensive. They also are not a cure, but just a means of being able to see well. When you don’t wear them you have bad vision. It may also be the case that glasses can even worsen your vision over time. For surgery, the common issue is that it can be risky and expensive. There are also natural ways to improve your eyesight.

One way many people have attempted to find a myopia cure is through exercises. Some exercises involve you rolling your eyes side to side and up and down. This is an attempt to stimulate blood flow to the eyes. This has to be repeated for a long period for it to have even the slightest effect. Some people have received positive results so it is worth a try.

Another common solution is to take a bilberry extract supplement. It has been shown to prevent macular degeneration and is also believed to help with night vision problems. It also improves the overall health of your eye sight because of its vitamin levels. Bilberry is a fruit that is similar to a blueberry.

Another manner by which you can cure myopia is by relaxing your eyes after reading or staring at the t v or computer. After 30 minutes of nearsighted work, stare at a wall in the distance for at least 5 minutes. This will relax your eyes. Myopia cure through relaxation is very easy and free.

Mario Santos has been working as an eye wellness expert for years and has helped hundreds of people who have eyesight problems.

Lymphadenitis – Ayurvedic Herbal Treatment

Lymphadenitis means inflammation in the lymph nodes. This can be generalized or localized. This condition usually points to some infection or inflammation. A common example of this is tonsillitis, where the tonsil glands are swollen and inflamed, usually due to repeated infections involving the throat. Generalized swelling of the lymph glands may point to more serious infections like HIV and tuberculosis, or may be indicators of serious diseases like cancer. Filariasis causes significant inflammation of the lymph glands and lymphatic channels, usually in the lower limbs, resulting in gross edema of the feet.

Clinical examination and relevant medical tests usually help pinpoint the exact cause of lymphadenitis, and conservative treatment is usually sufficient to help treat and cure the condition. Of late, however, more and more individuals have started presenting with gross lymphadenitis in various parts of the body, without evidence of any specific cause like tuberculosis, widespread infection, or cancer. Symptoms vary according to the location of affected lymph glands. Inflamed and enlarged glands in the chest may cause breathlessness, cough, or fluid collection in the layering of the lungs (known as pleural effusion). Similarly affected glands in the abdominal cavity may cause symptoms like abdominal pain, adhesions in the intestinal loops, and fluid collection in the ovaries or peritoneal cavity (known as ascites).

The commonest chronic cause of such swelling and inflammation of lymph glands is tuberculosis infection, so much so that even when all diagnostic tests come out negative, most health professionals still consider it worthwhile to give a therapeutic trial of anti-tuberculosis medications. Indeed, a large percentage of such affected individuals do benefit with this therapy; however, when even this treatment does not work, it becomes necessary to explore other causes for this condition.

Chronic inflammation due to stress, food allergies, exposure to toxins, hidden and obscure infections, and autoimmune processes within the body, is fast becoming a reality of modern times. Such inflammation, in addition to lymph glands and lymph ducts, may also affect blood vessels, skin, and various organs in the body. If multiple tissues and glands are involved, the presentation of clinical signs and symptoms will vary accordingly.

Coming back to non-specific inflammation of lymph glands, treatment needs to be given at various levels. Herbal medicines are given to reduce inflammation, and remove excess accumulated fluid. Herbs with known antiviral and antibacterial actions are given to treat infections. Immune-modulating herbs are used to treat a dysfunctional immune system. Specific diet instructions are given to address food allergies, and prevent inflammation. Adequate lifestyle recommendations are given to reduce stress and get sufficient, good quality sleep on a regular basis.

It is also necessary to normalize the digestive capacity and intestinal flora of affected individuals. Detoxification may also be necessary, especially for people who do not respond well to the treatment mentioned above. People with a strong autoimmune component may need more aggressive therapy for a longer period of time.

Most people having non-specific lymphadenitis respond very well to this line of treatment and report complete resolution of all symptoms. It is necessary for them to continue following a healthy diet and lifestyle so as to prevent a recurrence.

Upper Respiratory Infection Pathophysiology – Manifestation and Remedy

Upper respiratory infection, or URI, is an acute illness also known as the common cold. It is most often due to a bacterial or viral invasion of the body, that enters through the respiratory system.

Pathophysiology:

URIs characteristically attack the mucosal lining the upper respiratory airway. It is spread by coming into contact with secretions from an infected person, or by the water droplet nuclei produced when a person coughs or sneezes into the environment. This is why covering your mouth when coughing, and covering the face when sneezing is important to prevent the spread of upper respiratory infections to others.

Once a pathogen enters the body, it must overcome particular barriers before causing disease. These barriers include:

– Nose hair

– Mucus

– Cells with cilia located in the lower part of the respiratory tract

– Stomach acids

The purpose of these barriers is to trap the foreign invaders to reduce your chances of getting a cold or the flu. The cells in the lower respiratory tract have cilia that capture and bring pathogens to the pharynx, where they can be swallowed and taken to the stomach where they can be destroyed by digestive juices in the stomach.

Your adenoids and tonsils:

The adenoids and tonsils help to defend against disease causing pathogens due to their immune cells that respond to foreign invaders. These cells include: Macrophages, Monocytes, Neutrophils and Eosinophils.

The general scope of nasopharyngeal passage that comprises of staph and strept even defend from pathogens. People with defective immunity, like AIDS, are in grave danger of contagion factor as their immunity is found grossly deficient.

In return, pathogens are equipped to struggle. Through genesis of toxins and proteases, and by creating capsules, they manage to keep choking of phagocytic cells at bay.

Incubation periods vary among the types of pathogens. Rhinoviruses and flu can take up to 5 days to incubate. Others, such as pertussis and take up to 10 days or as long as three weeks before symptoms present themselves. Epstein-Barr incubation period can be up to 6 weeks.

What kinds of symptoms are witnessed during upper respiratory infection?

People who have never suffered from URIor upper respiratory infection are affected by following manifestations:

– Runny nose

– Head congestion – Feels like there is a hug cork jammed into the middle of your face

– Nasal congestion – Caused by swollen nasal passages that have slammed completely shut

– Chest congestion – Bronchial airways clogged with mucus

– Coughing

– Sneezing

– Sore, scratchy throat

– Hoarseness

– Fever

Treatment:

Treatment for URI is to reduce symptoms. Most colds and flu are caused by viruses, against which antibiotics have no power. Antibiotics work against bacterial infections only. If you have a URI, there are over-the-counter medications for cough, runny nose, congestion, and fever to help minimize symptoms and help you to feel better.

Glaucoma and Laser Surgery

Certain factors can cause poor drainage of aqueous fluids in the eye and this results in the build up of pressure which can cause damage to the optic nerves that helps the eye function for vision. This leads to an eye disease called glaucoma and if left untreated, it can cause permanent loss of vision. Through the years many techniques and procedures have been developed to diagnose and treat it and at this time the most promising solution is glaucoma laser surgery.

Glaucoma comes in different forms and determining what type of glaucoma a patient has helps in determining what treatment options there are. Initially, in an attempt to relieve pressure in the eye, doctors give eye drops and medication taken orally are given. If it does not help, then glaucoma laser surgery is the next option.

Argon laser trabeculoplasty is one form of glaucoma laser surgery technique used primary open angle glaucoma. Tiny burns are made into the trabecular network of the eyes to improve the draining and flow of aqueous fluid in the eyes. A specific form of this procedure is selective laser trabeculoplasty or SLT. This uses laser beams to remove only very specific target cells in the trabecular network. As a result, it improves the flow of aqueous fluids and relieves the pressure.

In some cases, it may take two sessions and in some, it may require repeating the procedure after two or three years. This, however is recommended because it avoids the need for medication after the procedure. It is also the glaucoma laser surgery procedure commonly recommended for pigmentary glaucoma which is common among males of African-American descent.

Angle closure glaucoma results if the space or angle between the iris and cornea is too narrow and this results in poor drainage of aqueous fluids. Peripheral iridotomy is the glaucoma laser surgery option for this type.

To relieve the pressure, laser beams are used to make a small hole on the iris. The space or angle widens as the iris moves away from it. This corrects the flow of aqueous fluids.

For more severe cases of glaucoma, the procedure usually recommended is laser cyclophotocoagulation. An example is when new blood vessels are formed in the eye as a result of diabetic retinopathy. The new blood vessels can seriously affect the flow of aqueous fluids in the eye resulting in pressure buildup. This leads to a form of glaucoma called neovascular glaucoma.

For this glaucoma laser surgery procedure, the doctor uses endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation to observe the ciliary body. This is also connected to an endoscopic camera. This will then guide the application of the laser beam to treat the ciliary body so it reduces or stops the production of fluids. By using a laser beam, part of the ciliary body is destroyed so that it no longer produces aqueous fluid. Less aqueous fluid means less pressure on the eye.

These glaucoma laser surgery procedures are usually painless. Some may feel a slight stinging sensation but apart from that, no major pain is felt. After undergoing glaucoma laser surgery, some rest for a few days is required and soon one can go back to the normal daily routine.

Also, in some cases, the patient needs to take some medication to relieve some minor discomforts that may appear after the procedure. Eye inflammation and slight risks in developing cataract may be some of the problems that may arise after each glaucoma laser surgery.

Glaucoma is a serious problem that can lead to permanent damage to the eye. It is important that it is well-understood and that a number of techniques are available to treat it.

Laser surgery is fast becoming a popular option for glaucoma treatment. The techniques are also becoming more and more advanced and refined to ensure that treatment results only in success and there is complete absence of discomfort during and after the treatment. They are also being improved to make the positive results long lasting, making glaucoma laser surgery a very promising form of treatment for glaucoma patients. As with any medical problem, thoroughly discuss all options with your physician.