Treatment For Shingles is Available

You may be experiencing an itchy rash, a painful rash with blisters and bumps on one half of your body. You could be dealing with pain and discomfort that may be debilitating. If you are dealing with these things, you might be one of the many sufferers of a disease called shingles. Shingles can be pure torture for those who have it – and many are at their wits end trying to figure out what they can do about it. For those who suffer daily from the effects of shingles, treatment for shingles is a necessity they can not afford to ignore. People do not want shingles to define their lives, and want to break free from this cycle of pain.

Shingles is an affliction that is the result of a childhood illness: chicken pox. Chicken pox is a virus called varicella zoster , and it does not actually go away once you recover from chicken pox. Rather, it lies dormant in the body for many years, mostly causing no harm at all. But when you get older, and your immune system may weaken for various reasons, this virus may be triggered to reawaken and reemerge, traveling the body to find itself at the end of our nerves, literally. This is what leads to the pain and discomfort that shingles sufferers experience. If you are having pain with shingles, it will usually only last for three to five weeks – but in some instances, the illness becomes a condition known as posttherpetic neuralgia, and is accompanied by more debilitating, chronic pain. If you wish to avoid the hardship that can come from neuralgia, you will want to seek treatment for shingles as soon as you possibly can. Having shingles is very difficult for many people to deal with both physically and psychologically – so getting rented right away is a huge help.

If you have shingles, you are likely suffering from symptoms that can mimic common illnesses, such as stomach aches, fever, chills, headaches, and the like. If you develop the rash – and most people do – then it will help determine whether or not you have shingles, for those who can not tell if you have it or not. When coming down with shingles, you will likely get red spots that blister and become yellowed scar tissue.

Getting treatment for shingles is very important – but it can actually be lifesaving for people who are going through other ordeals which weaken and compromise their immune systems. Some of these include suffering from HIV, undergoing a transplant, and getting chemotherapy or radiation treatments. For these individuals, shingles can be more than just a debilitating illness – it can be fatal.

Now that you know what shingles looks like, you can begin the process of treating it. Topical creams, ointments, and anti-inflammatory medications are good treatment options for shingle. In addition, people may also use natural remedies to help with pain. Keep in mind that many natural remedies may not be FDA-approved.

No matter the level of pain and discomfort you may be feeling, there is hope in treatment for shingles.

Nutrition and Stroke Patients

Nutrition augments stroke treatment and must be administrated accordingly by the caregiver and stroke patient's family. According to research, nutrition affects the course and outcome of a stroke patient's life and recovery.

A study conducted by Salah Gariballa of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom notes that, "stroke patients are highly dependent on others for their nutritional requirements being met. Many are undernourished prior to the stroke and their nutritional status declines further in the hospital" .

Gariballa's research showed that due to poor diet provided to stroke patients, they become susceptible to diseases such as urinary tract infections, undernutrition, dehydration, among others.

A great way to avoid these from happening would be to undertake considering measures such as:

1. Get a reputable nutritionist – the first thing family members and caregivers of stroke patients should do to get a reputable nutritionist to identify what diet should be complied with. This ensures tailor-fitting meals that will help the stroke patient recover physical and mental strength to adapt to the various treatments, as well as absorb learning where applicable.

2. Subscribe to a health and wellness food magazine – exposure is one of the best ways to adapt to change. If the patient used to love unhealthy food it is relevant then to immerse him or her to literature that will boost the desire for healthy food. This is also a great way to improve memory and reorient the patient in relearning various topics, especially since food magazines are typically very visual and can pose as a great activity for learning images.

3. Watch cooking shows for the health-conscious – if food magazines are not available, find useful purpose for the television through cooking shows the inspire consumption of good food and health habits.

4. Encourage everyone to adapt to the new health lifestyle – any endeavor, to be effective, requires conscious group effort. The same goes to having a healthy lifestyle for the patient. This must be supported by family and friends – the best way of showing support is eating nutritious food yourself.

5. Enjoy the food together – there's no better way to enjoy good nutritious food than eating it with loved ones. Boost the patient's gusto for food by joining them in their meals.

Proper and good nutrition augments stroke treatment as it provides the necessary antioxidants and components for the body to recover from the deficiencies of stroke. It is the role of caregivers and family members to ensure the stroke patient gets the nutrition needed as the latter is solely dependent on the former for this.

Mushroom Spawn Making – How to Make Your Own Mushroom Spawn

One of the best things about growing mushrooms is that when you have started to grow them you can continue to grow them for years and years without the need to purchase any more mushroom spawn. It is very simple to create your own spawn and be able to store this in a fridge ready to use for several weeks.

Mushroom spawn is simply some kind of food which has mycelium growing through it. The food is usually some kind of bird seed such as corn or rye grain, and this is used because the mycelium loves to grow through it and because of the shape and small size of the grain it provides many innoculation points (it has a large surface area which means you have more chance of the mycelium “leaping off” and growing through your substrate).

Creating your own mushroom spawn can be a very easy process when you know exactly how its done and when you are aware of the possible problems caused by contaminations (which is why it is very important to have good sterile procedures). To make your own spawn you firstly need your own mushroom spores. Take a mushroom and leave it on a piece of foil to leave a spore print. Next you add a little distilled water to this print (a few millilitres) and mix this solution using something called an innoculation loop (small piece of wire with a metal curve in one end). This will mix the spores with the water. Next you need to use a syringe and suck up this solution. As mentioned before its important that the syringe is clean and any other equipment too.

You can store this spore syringe in a cool place such as a refrigerator until ready to use. Next you will need to get a large jar and fill it up with the chosen grain (such as Rye grain). Place a piece of tyvek over the cover and seal with a metal lid. It helps if you drill 4 small holes in the lid (near the corners) which are used as innoculation points later.

When you are ready take the spore syringe and inject a few millilitres of your solution into the 4 holes in the lid of the jar. Usually one syringe can innoculate around 5 jars. When complete, place the jars in a warm place and after about 4 weeks your contents will have colonised and mushrooms will start to form! Or you could simply use this colonised jar of grain and use it as spawn – the choice is yours. You could even multiply the spawn and turn the 5 jars into as many as 25! This is simply done by getting more jars of grain and mixing in part of the colonised spawn jar with the others. One jar can turn into 10 if done properly!

My Face is So Painful it Can Hurt to Talk

Question:
I have had terrible pain and aching in the side of face for about four years. Thinking it was my teeth, I spent a fortune at the dentist, but it made no difference. The doctor says that it's 'trigeminal neuralgia'. I'm on a drug called carbemazepine but I still have days when it hurts just to talk or wash. It can also hurt round my eyes, which become red and puffy underneath. Have you any suggestions, please?

Answer:
I get many letters about this debilitating problem, which I am sure your doctor has diagnosed correctly, Neuralgia reiter to nerves. Cords of nerves, bundled, up in fibers surrounded by a protective sheath, run with messages from the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord) to the muscles, skin and other body organs. Twelve pairs of cranial nerves come from the brain. Sensory nerves pick up touch, pressure, vibration, heat, cold and pain, as well as vision, taste, smell and hearing. Motor cranial nerves carry out the movements of the facial, eye, tongue, swallowing and speech muscles, and of the diaphragm.

The fifth and largest cranial nerve is a mixed nerve, called trigeminal because it has three branches. The top one supplies the upper part of the face, the middle one goes to the cheeks, nose and upper lip, and the lower one to the mouth, teeth, tongue and lower jaw. If the trigeminal nerve malfunctions, it can cause sensory problems including pain or motor complications such as difficulty chewing. Tic douloureux is a painful facial spasm that may occur with trigeminal neuralgia. The nerves are so sensitive that the tic can be triggered by a light touch, strong breeze, even a movement. Each attack can last for several minutes to several hours. The pain is so intense that some people opt to have the nerve surgically destroyed and face the prospect of a numb mouth, rather than more attacks.

Trigeminal neuralgia is hard to treat, its the undering cause is still not known. Strong painkillers are usually prescribed, and sometimes anti-epileptic drugs, such as carbemazepine, to suppress the spasm or tic. The problem, from what you say, is that yours is not the tic type but comes in waves.

My suggestions for moderating the painful bouts are as follows

* Eat soft foods, so that you do not need to chew a lot. Try soup, mushy rice, mashed potatoes, minced meat, turkey and chicken, overcooked or pureed vegetables, porridge soft-boiled eggs, mashed bananas and fresh non-citrus fruit and vegetable juices.

* Avoid cold foods, such as ice cream or ice cold drinks, also citrus fruits, coffee, excess salt, sugar and alcohol, which can all aggravate the pain.

* I have found massage and acupuncture to be the best form of treatment My special neck massage improves the blood flow to the brainstem and midbrain, via the vertebral arteries in the neck. These arteries have tiny blood vessels (called vasa nervorum) sprouting from them, which feed the trigeminal and other cranial nerves. Improving blood flow to nerves can cure infection. I have massed the necks of patients in the middle of an attack and witnessed instant relief. Rub along the sides of the neck and also give the neck traction by putting your hands round the base of the skull and very gently pulling it away from the shoulders.Also massage trigger points behind the ears, down the jaw, under the lower lip and down the lines from nose to mouth. Massage these points with your thumb or index finger for one or two minutes each, twice a day, until the pain vanishes.

* To help you relax, take Biorelax: one twice daily for one month. Also take vitamin B-complex: one daily for two months. Listening to relaxation CD or tape in the evenings before bed should also help.

* As soon as you feel an attack coming on, do the following retention breathing exercise for five minutes. Inhale deeply and hold your breath for 10 to 15 seconds, then – just when you think you are about to burst (do not panic) – breathe out very gently. Inhale slowly and hold your breath again for as long as you can. Practice daily, so that it redness and puffiness under your eyes, I suspect that this may be linked to the autonomous nervous system, which controls involuntary functions, including breathing and body temperature control, rather than the effects of the trigeminal neuralgia I think it would be worth asking your doctor to investigate. Perhaps you could be referred to a neurologist for more tests.

Degenerative Disc Disease – Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression Can Help

Millions of Americans suffer from severe back and neck pain as a result Degenerative Disc Disease. DDD as it is often referred to in the literature is not really a "disease" in the common sense of the word, but rather a term used to describe a process or condition that develops gradually and worsens over time. Use of this term indicates that the cartilage-like disks between the spinal vertebral joints are the primary cause of the symptoms, and that the degenerative changes are rather advanced. To some degree intervertebral discs lose their flexibility, elasticity, and shock absorbing characteristics as we age as do the other tissues in the body. Abnormal or excessive mechanical stresses or injuries of the past coupled with hereditary, developmental, and metabolic effects can rapidly accelerate this process.

As the implied disc dries out and loses height (a process known as desiccation) it causes the vertebra to become closer together narrowing the channels through which the nerve roots pass. A dry, hard disc can absorb less shock and is that more easily torn resulting in a greater likelihood of herniation or bulge further compressing or pinching the nerves. As the stress on the joint compounds and osteoarthritis begins to result, bone spurs form and ligaments thicken (hypertrophy) gradually narrowing the nerve channels even further. These factors in various combinations and degrees of severity mitigate the space in the nerve channels, a condition known as spinal stenosis (narrowing), and conspire to compress (pinch) the nerves.

Symptoms of Degenerative Disc Disease

The most common symptom of degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine is low back pain (lumbalgia). If the cervical spine is affected, the most common symptom is neck pain (cervicalgia). When degenerative disc disease causes compression of the cervical nerve roots there may be shoulder pain, arm pain, and pain in the hand / fingers (neuritis, neuralgia, radiculitis), and may be associated with numbness and tingling (paresthesia). When degenerative disc disease causes compression of the lumbar nerve roots there may be butt pain, hip pain, leg pain, and pain in the foot / toes. This often is accompanied by muscle weakness in either the arm or leg.

Spinal Decompression Treatment

In the past, a patient suffering from disc problems was usually given pain medications or injections, directed to refrain from physical activities, referred for physical therapy, and when they were not progressing they were sent for spinal surgery or simply told to learn to live it. Since 2001 when the FDA finally approved non-surgical spinal decompression therapy, there is new hope for those who suffer from degenerative disc disease. Spinal Decompression Therapy is a non-invasive, non-surgical treatment performed on a special, computer controlled table similar in some ways to an ordinary traction table. A single disc level is isolated and by utilizing specific traction and relaxation cycles throughout the treatment, along with proper positioning, negative pressure can actually be created within the disc. It works by gently separating the offending disc 5 to 7 millimeters creating negative pressure (or a vacuum) inside the disc to pull water, oxygen, and nutrients into the disc, thereby re-hydrating a degenerated disc and bringing in the nutrients needed to heal the torn fibers and halt the degenerative process. As the disc is re-hydrated the shock absorbing properties are restored and a normal life can be resumed.

Exercises That Aid in Stroke Recovery

There are many exercises that aid in stroke recovery. There are physical, mental, and occupational exercises used by therapists during stroke rehabilitation. Some of them are:

1. Physical Exercises – As the word connotes, these are a range of bodily motions meant to tone fat, enhance muscle buildup, and strengthen the body. Stroke patients are given physical exercises to hone them to move their body, avoid spasticity of the muscles, and regain strength, balance, and independence. Samples of exercises that aid in stroke recovery include:
a) Passive Range of Motion = this aims to keep the muscles flexible and the joints lubricated through movement of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, fingers, hip, knee, and ankles.
b) Active Assisted Range of Motion = this set of exercises begin once the affected limb has been restored of its function and involves the help of another person in its performance
c) Active and Resisted Range of Motion = exercises taught during this phase enables the patient to move their own limbs without assistance through all the range of motion at every joint, such as those involving free weights, resistance bands, and the manual resistance coming from the therapist.
d) Coordination Exercises = this focuses on the regaining control over the affected limb by lifting the leg or placing it on the heel of the other leg, for example.
e) Balance and Stability Exercises = this entails the control of the person's trunk while sitting or standing. Thus, the patient is asked to do a series of exercises incorporating sitting and standing with the aid of parallel bars, walkers, and canes.

2. Mental Exercises – Mental exercise to reverse the effect of stroke on the patient are normally done under cognitive rehabilitation as the case may apply. Often, exercises include memory retention and sharpening such as math functions, reasoning, logic, and concept. These exercises are repeated over time as long as it is necessary.

3. Occupational Exercises – Exercises include learning to do daily activities that will help the patient go back to normal life, such as sweeping the floor, brushing the teeth, picking up pieces, folding clothes and linen, among others. The goal is to let the patient do this things, over time, on his own.

There are many exercises that aid in stroke recovery and are used during the rehabilitation process. These exercises should always be done with caution to avoid further injury. It is best that these are performed with professionals only.

Why People Get Pacemakers – A Symptom List

It is difficult to draw the portrait of the "typical pacemaker patient." Pacemaker patients include infants and children, athletes and schools, the aged and infirm. Despite the fact that pacemakers have been standard treatment in medicine for cardiac arrhythmias for over 50 years, most people do not know much about them. In fact, sometimes people get symptoms, see their doctor, and are surprised to find out that a pacemaker is the prescription.

People get pacemakers to correct a problem with the heart known as a cardiac arrhythmia. In layman's terms, it means the heart's natural rhythm is getting out-of-whack.

While just about everyone often experiences occasional but very short bouts of out-of-rhythm cardiac activity, some people have stubborn arrhythmias that cause symptoms, impair their ability to lead a normal life, and are highly unpredictable. These people need pacemakers. Symptoms that may mean you need a pacemaker include fatigue, dizziness, lightheadedness, even fainting, as well as ability to exercise without getting overly out of breath.

These are pretty vague symptoms and a person could easily have all of those conditions and not need a pacemaker. But let's talk about what's really going on.

The healthy heart beats in a specific rhythm that coordinates the heart's upper chambers (atria) and lower chambers (ventricles) in such a way that the heart beat is quite efficient at moving a very large quantity of blood throughout the body. This blood is called cardiac output. If cardiac output drops to zero, the person dies in a matter of minutes.

But in many cases, the electrical system of the heart (not the dumping ability) starts to falter. This is an electrical problem of the heart-not a problem with the heart's ability to pump blood. Yet many people do not even realize the heart as an electrical system.

Electrical impulses produced by the heart guide the heart's rhythm. If the heart stops producing electricity in a regular manner or the electricity no longer travels properly through the heart muscle, the result can be an arrhythmia.

There are two main types of arrhythmia that can lead to a person's getting a pacemaker. The first is called "sinus node dysfunction," which sounds very complicated. It really means that the heart no longer produces electrical energy at the right rate.

The heart has the amazing ability to produce electricity. This is accomplished by a small area of ​​tissue called the sinoatrial node (nicknamed "sinus node" or just "sinus") in the upper right hand side of the heart. If the sinus node gets sluggish or produces electricity erratically or produces electricity fine at low rates but can not keep up when you exercise and need a faster heart rate … that is sinus node dysfunction.

About half of all people with pacemakers have this condition. The resulting arrhythmia for a person with sinus node dysfunction is a heart rate that is too slow to support normal activity. The medical term for this is "sinus bradycardia." Because you do not get enough cardiac output to do normal things, you can find yourself getting winded, tired, dizzy, or even passing out doing things you used to do.

The second kind of arrhythmia that can lead to a pacemaker sounds a lot simpler, but the name is a bit of a misnomer. It's called "heart block." Heart block is not really a blockage at all. Instead, it means that the electrical impulses produced by the heart no longer travel efficiently through the heart muscle. The electrical energy gets delayed or even blocked in some areas.

In the healthy heart, the electrical energy that causes the heart to beat starts in the sinoatrial node (top, right side of the heart). It then travels out over the atria and then downward. As it makes its ways to the ventricles, it passes through a junction called the "atrioventricular node" or or AV node.

Once the electrical energy goes through the AV node, it travels to the ventricle and causes the ventricles to contract and pump blood. Heart block occurs when there is a problem at the AV node. Sometimes the electrical energy gets delayed in such a way that the atria and ventricles are no longer working together.

In extreme forms of heart block, the energy from the top half of the heart can not make its way down to the bottom half at all (this is called "complete heart block"). Because the atria and ventricles do not work in harmony, cardiac output is impaired. The result is the same slew of symptoms: lightheadedness, dizziness, shortness of breath, feeling tired all of the time, and even fainting.

About half of all people who need pacemakers have some form of heart block (it can be mild to severe).

Arrhythmias can get fairly complicated. For example, one person may have both types of these arrhythmias that require a pacemaker, that is, one person can have sinus node dysfunction and heart block at the same time. Even individuals who might only have one arrhythmia right now can develop another kind of arrhythmia in the future.

Pacemakers accomplish this by "filling in the missing beats."

Pacemakers are small electrical devices implanted in the chest. They deliver electrical energy to the heart at precisely the right moment to keep it beating in a way that is as "normal" as possible. In many patients, pacemakers restore normal heart rhythm. In some patients, the arrhythmia may be too severe for a normal heart rhythm to be restored, but the pacemaker can at least come close.

Pacemakers "know" when to deliver electrical energy to the heart because they monitor every beat of the heart and respond according to how the physician programs them. This is a useful feature since many facemaker patients do not require constant pacing. In fact, for many people, arrhythmias are not permanent at all, but come and go, sometimes for brief periods. The pacemaker monitors the heart's activity and jumps in with stimulating (pacing) energy when an arrhythmia occurs.

There is, at the moment, no cure for arrhythmias in the sense that an erratic heart rhythm can not be restored with an operation or a pill. True, operations, pills, and other remedies can help manage symptoms or even correct part of the problem.

Pacemakers are actually very safe ways of dealing with specific arrhythmias. Although they're implanted in the body, they do not deliver drugs or other chemicals into the body. They use electricity, which is the very substance the body would generate itself, if it could.

Doctors have a lot of flexibility in terms of how the pacemaker is programmed, so they are suitable for a wide range of people, from athletes to newborns to bedridden seniors.

And pacemakers have a memory so that they can report back to the doctor what's been going on in the patient's heart. Not all arrhythmias can be treated with a pacemaker. But for rhythm disorders like heart block or sinus bradycardias, pacemakers are a safe, effective, and well proven technology that can make a big difference in the lives of those that need them.

Alopecia – Women Deserve Better Care

We are seeing more and more alopecia women who approach us because they are tired of gluing hairpieces to their heads. This practice started many years ago and was first used on men with male pattern baldness. The hair piece is glued directly onto the scalp with an adhesive that can only be removed by a technician. The average wear time before removal is 6 weeks.

I know exactly how they feel because I also wore glued on wigs in the past. I felt trapped in something I was unable to remove. After a few months, no matter how often I washed the hair it still had an offensive odor. The most distasteful and even medically harmful side effect was the dermatitis I developed on my skin. I had to seek medical attention from my dermatologist to help with the resulting infection.

This type of hair replacement is not an alopecia treatment but a cover up. Many other hair replacement options give you security without the harmful effects of glue. Because an alopecia cure is not in sight I recommend doing your homework and reach out for alopecia support before making a decision.

As a result of this awful experience I introduced the vacuum hairpiece into the American market. No tape or glue is needed to keep this hairpiece on the head. You can even swim. Alopecia women deserve a better solution than a glued on hairpiece. There is no skin irritation associated with vacuum wigs, and they leave you with a more secure feeling.

There are better options available.

Shingles-What It Is and Treatment Options

"Shingles" is the name of the painful rash many people get as they get older and their immunity wanes. The rash is characterized by tiny blisters on red skin that usually occurs on one side of the body in a band-like distribution. The rash is often preceded by a 1-2 day period of intense, burning, sharp pain in the area where the rash will develop. Many people will mistake the pain as pain from muscle strain, heart attack (angina), gallbladder attack, appendicitis or kidney stones. Once the rash develops, the blisters will always dry up and the redness will disappear in approximately 10-14 days. The pain of shingles may last as long as the rash is present, may disappear once the rash appears, or may persist after the rash is gone. When the pain persists longer than 4 weeks after the rash is cured, the pain is called post-herpetic neuralgia. This pain can be very debilitating. It is often described as a constant burning, knife-like, throbbing, or aching sensation. It adversely affects people's ability to move, think and sleep. Post-herpetic neuralgia can lead to depression because the pain and condition is not curable; available medicines may decrease the severity of pain periodically.

The virus that causes "shingles" is the herpes virus responsible for chickenpox. One someone contracts chickenpox, the virus travels along nerves and becomes dormant in the dorsal root (sensory) ganglia of the spinal cord. When the body is "stressed", either by an illness, medication, emotional stressor, or physical trauma, the virus may be re-activated and travel along a nerve supplying a dermatome of skin and cause pain and a rash. Once someone experiences shingles (also known as herpes zoster,) the virus becomes dormant again. Unfortunately, the virus may re-activate more than once during a person's lifetime. It may affect more than one dermatome, causing pain and rash in different areas of the body. When shingles occurs in particular facial nerves, it may cause blindness, deafness and diminished taste sensation.

The treatment of shingles begins with prompt and accurate diagnosis of herpes zoster. When anti-viral medications, such as acyclovir and famcyclovir, are started during the first 72 hrs of the illness and continued to for 7-10 days, the duration and severity of rash will be reduced. These medications will not stop the pain or keep the rash from forming. They will also not post-herpetic neuralgia from developing. Tricyclic antidepressants (Elavil), topical anesthetics (lidocaine or capsaicin) and / or narcotic analgesics can be used to limit the pain. If post-herpetic neuralgia develops, antidepressant, anti-seizure, topical anesthetics and nerve blocks may be used to lessen the pain. The pain of post-herpetic neuralgia often requires the use of many treatment modalities, including chronic pain counseling and biofeedback, to help people cope with this chronic condition.

The best way to prevent herpes zoster from developing is keeping the immune system healthy and strong.

A Proven Way to Prevent a Sore Throat From Progressing to a Cold

Before I start sharing with you the proven way to prevent a sore throat from progressing to a cold, do you know experiencing periodic cold or flu can actually be helpful to your health? It may sound ridiculous but it is true, as told by my friend, who is a doctor by profession.

He stated that during our cold or flu period, our bodes are actually in the healing process of getting rid of those weakest cells which can help us to stay more healthier in the long run.

Here is how you can better prepare in preventing a cold from developing.

Gargle with warm salt water the moment you start experiencing that sore, tickling feeling in your throat. Try to tap your throat (Adam's apple region) with your fingers while you gargle so as to encourage the warm salt water to trickle deeply into your throat.

You probably may not be aware of, your tonsils and adenoids serve as a first line of defense against any airborne microorganisms and substances. It is a significant parts of your immune system located near the entrance of your breathing passages. Colds and flu viruses usually get eaten by your tonsils and adenoids before spreading through your body, and by gargling warm salt water it can effectively removed the viruses.

If you ever experience chronic swapping tonsils and adenoids at your throat region and is thinking of removing them, please reconsider seriously. It is highly not recommended. Try alternatives ways liked;

– Adopting a minimal processed diet, rich in fresh plant foods,
– Reduced your sugar intake especially cannoned drinks
– Get plenty of rest, exercise and exposed yourself outdoor more often.

You may ask gargling cold salt water works as well?

Either warm or cold salt water will help to remove those harmful viruses from your tonsils and adenoids, but if possible, try warm salt water as it promises to be more effective.

These are just simple and easy ways you can try out without any hassle before you consult your doctor.

Thanks for reading.

Alopecia in Men and Women Explained

My friend's 28- and 24-year old sons both have hair problems. The former has begun to lose his hair, while his younger brother is developing round, bald spots on his head. At such early age, one wonders which really causes hair loss, or baldness, and if there's anything that can be done to prevent it.

Hair loss – known as alopecia in the medical field – assumes different forms. In men, the most common pattern is the one in which hair starts to thin at the crown and the hairline begins to diminish. The exact sequence of this typical male-pattern hair loss goes this way: The hairline starts to recede at the forehead, and then at the temples and crown. In the end, the bare areas merge and only a fringe of hair is left at the back of the head and around the ears. This form is chiefly genetic in origin; it is primed by the presence of androgens (male hormones).

It is widely understood that one loser scalp hair as he or she gets older. It is likewise generally known that the tendency of some men or women to begin losing hair at an early age, and at a reliably fast rate, is hereditary.

The particular case of my friend's younger son is medically termed alopecia areata. This condition is characterized by the occurrence of hair loss in patches that produces a totally bare area encircled by normal hair growth. A number of scientific researchers point to the basic cause of this type of alopecia as being both genetic and immunological.

In women, abnormal loss of hair may happen temporarily after childbirth; or it may be the result of certain infections, ringworm, or even diabetes. While women do not usually suffer from total hair loss, their hair often thins as they get older. One of the usual contributing factors in alopecia in women is the hormonal changes that take place during the "change of life" (menopause).

Another type of the condition in women is referred to as traction alopecia. This form is associated with such hair styles – as ponytails – in which the hair is folded tautly away from the scalp. Excessive hair brushing and the use of rollers for an extended period are possible causes of this type of alopecia, too.

It is important that the person fully understands his or her particular hair-loss condition, especially when considering going through certain medical treatment processes or using prescription drugs. A better alternative to preventing this condition may well be a natural treatment approach. In this regard, men and women have to learn about the breakthrough information that reveal how one can stop hair loss naturally, strengthen, revitalize and restore thinning hair, and retain healthier, fuller, thicker hair.

Stop and prevent male and female alopecia and strengthen, revitalize and restore thinning hair. Learn about the breakthrough information that reveal how you can stop hair loss naturally and retain healthy, fuller, thicker hair. Visit Hair Loss No More at Preventing Alopecia .

For more health information, visit Round the Clock Health Guide .

What Is Glaucoma and Who Does It Affect?

Pressure in the eye is usually balanced and plays an important part in the functioning of the eye. This pressure is created when a fluid (known as aqueous) produced by cells behind the iris, passes through the pupil to be drained away by drain tunnels in the angle of the eye (gap between the cornea and the iris). Pressure increases if the angle becomes blocked and the aqueous can not drain away fast enough, or if too too much aqueous is produced.

Chronic glaucoma is more common in Western countries than acute glaucoma, but is easier to treat. This form of glaucoma causes no pain, and your eyesight seems normal, despite the damage being done to your optic nerve. Many people who have had chronic glaucoma for a long time before diagnosis complain of one eye's vision being worse than the others, or a loss of field vision in the shape of an arc above or below the center of their vision. If left untreated, it can result in "tunnel-vision", and in time, this too is lost. It is more common in people over the age of 40, and it affects 5% of the population over the age of 65. People of African origin are said to be more prone to glaucoma, as well as those with a high degree of short sightedness . Treatment includes eye drops (to reduce the amount of aqueous you produce, and to unblock the drainage tunnels) and laser surgery, to improve drainage.

Acute glaucoma is characterized by sudden pain in the eye, as well as the appearance of misty rainbow colored circles surrounding white lights. This may be followed by complete loss of sight and nausea and vomiting. Typically, people experience a series of mild attacks in the evenings, and with routine inspection at the hospital or GP's surgery, acute glaucoma is diagnosed. It is initially treated with drops to reduce the amount of aqueous produced, and then a small hole is made in the iris to remove the blockage in the angle. It is recommended that this is done to both eyes, as if you suffer with acute glaucoma in one eye, it is highly likely that you will contract it in the other.

It is important to attend your optician appointments, because even if you feel as though your eyesight is fine, there may be damage to your optic nerve, which will reduce your quality of vision in the long run. While this condition is not common, neither is rare and quick diagnosis is important to maintaining healthy eyesight.

Fungus Among Us

Fungal infection of the nails, also known as onychomycosis, is a very common foot condition treated by podiatrists. This condition is usually found in older patients. It is reported that 60% of people over 40 years old have evidence of fungus in their toe nails. Fungal nails are white to yellow in color and cause the nail to become thickened and lose their normal shape. Nails that have become abnormal in shape are called dystrophic. If the infection is severe, the thickened nail can begin to crumble. These infected thickened nails can also result in pain and discomfort when wearing shoes.

Lab tests for fungal nails: The presents of thickened dystrophic nails maybe an indication of a fungus infection. However, they can also occur in patients with a skin condition called psoriasis. Sometime, thickened nails can occur in patients with damaged nail roots due to major trauma such as a having an heavy object fall on the toe. More commonly, the trauma can be delivered to the toe in small doses, this is called micro trauma. This is caused by jamming the toenail into the top of the shoe. This kind of micro trauma is often associated with runners and people who wear narrow pointed shoes. Thus, before prescribing any creams, solutions, or oral medication to treat fungal nails, the podiatrist must send a sample of the nail to the lab to confirm the presence of fungus.

Prescription treatment of Fungal Nails: Using prescription medications to treat fungal nails usually takes many months before any improvement is seen in the nail. This is due to the long life cycle of the fungal organism and the slow growth of the toe nail. Most anti-fungal drugs attack the replication or reproducing cycle of fungus. Therefore, the improvement will only be seen in new growth of the slow growing nail Thus, a great deal of patience is required in treating fungal nails. It is also important to realize that after the completion of anti-fungal drugs, there can be a recurrence in fungal infection.

Common Types of Anti-fungal drugs: Terbinafine also known as Lamisil is the most potent anti-fungal drug used for fungal nails. It is easily distributed by the body into the nail via the nail root. Since terbinafine is broken down in the body by the liver, it is essential that a liver function blood test is performed before starting this drug. Patients with liver problems should not use terbinafine since this can result in severe damage to the liver. Thus, the podiatrist must request a blood test before prescribing this medication and during the course of the medication. The drug is taken once a day for 3 months. If side effects such as stomach or abdomen pain, diarrhea, rashes or headaches occur, the podiatrist should be notified. Lamisil will work to cure the fungus about 77% of the time.

Itraconazole (Brand name is Sporanox) is another oral anti-fungal drug that prevents the fungus from building its skeletal structure. The course of this treatment is 3 months as well. Additionally, this drug interacts with other medications, so a complete list of current medications should be given to the podiatrist. Cure rate is about 66%.

Ciclopirox 8% lacquer is an anti-fungal solution that is applied to the entire nail and 5 mm of surrounding skin for 12 months. This prevents the fungus from receiving its nutrients needed to grow. Common side effect is redness around the nail. There is a cure rate of 29%-36% with this medication.

During the course of the treatment for the fungal nails patients should follow the a hygiene protocol. Wash the feet two times a week with Betadine and soap. (As long as there is no history of Iodine allergy) Use anti-fungal foot powder in the socks. Change socks every day. Use a fungal spore killing agent in the shoes such as Micomist by Gordon Labs, as directed.

Management of Fungal Nails: For patients with poor kidney/liver disease, prescription medication may worsen these medical problems. Oral anti-fungal medication can decrease kidney and liver function. Thus, the best option in these cases may be routine nail debridement by a podiatrist. The podiatrist will cut the thickened fungal nails with special nail clippers, which then may be followed by grinding and filing of the nail by using a sanding disc or burr. The routine nail debridement usually requires the patients to return to the podiatrist about every 3-4 months.

Prevention of Fungal Nails: 1. Wear sandals when using public showers 2. Alternate shoes every day 3. Change socks daily 4. Avoid sharing shoes or socks

Final Thoughts: Lasers for the treatment of fungal nails. This therapy has become very popular in the last two years. There are currently two types of lasers being used to treat fungal nails. The first uses patented technology to attack the fungal spoors. The other laser uses infrared light waves to cause light or photo damage to the fungal cells. At this time the have been no large studies to prove the effectiveness of these treatment modalities. At this time, there are multi-center studies in progress to accurately determine the cure rates for the use of lasers on fungal nails. However, until these studies are published there is no evidence based proof that lasers can successfully treat this condition.

Copyright (c) 2010 Bruce Lashley

Fits And Epilepsy: A Guide To Treatment And Diagnosis

Epilepsy is a condition well-known for centuries. Maybe you recognize it by its more common name ‘fits’. No matter what name you use, epilepsy is a condition that affects the lives of millions of people all over the world. It is the most common neurological condition. It is estimated that 1-3% of the global population is affected by seizures, with men being more likely to have epilepsy than women.

Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterized by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. This abnormal electrical activity results in convulsions or fits. The most recognizable type of convulsion is one in which the person experiences rapid and violent jerking movements of the body. However, there are many other types of fits or convulsions that do not look like this and may sometimes be so small or so fast that even the patient does not notice them. Convulsions can be very varied and are different from person to person and sometimes varies in the same person at different times.

Epilepsy can affect anyone at any point in their lives. Contrary to popular belief, epilepsy does not mean that a person is incapable or mentally comprised. A seizure or fit generally lasts for less than a minute. If a person has a seizure for more than five minutes or if they remain unconscious for a prolonged period of time after the fit has stopped, call for emergency services.

How Is Epilepsy Diagnosed?

For a diagnosis of epilepsy to be made, a person must experience two or more unprovoked seizures. For a seizure to be called unprovoked, it means that there should be no environmental or detectable cause of the seizure such as overdose, hypoxia, infections, etc. A neurologist will diagnose epilepsy based on a thorough medical examination and medical history. It is important to be as honest as possible about symptoms so that you can receive an accurate diagnosis.

A neurological examination is a way to test for the motor, sensory, balance, mental functions, and other higher brain functions. A doctor may also ask for certain blood tests to paint a clearer picture of the situation and rule out other conditions. Neurophysiological tests such as an electroencephalogram (EEG) and imaging tests such as MRI help in the diagnosis of epilepsy and convulsions.

An electroencephalogram (EEG) measures the electrical activity of the brain. Metal electrodes covered with a conductive gel are placed over the scalp and these measure the electrical potentials generated by neurons in the brain. This is a painless procedure that can provide valuable insights into the functioning of the brain. This is the most commonly used test for epilepsy. If a person experience fits or convulsions, there is an electrical disturbance in the brain that can be detected with an EEG. By studying the patterns and types of abnormalities seen in the EEG, a specialist can determine the type of epilepsy. This will dictate further treatment and prognosis for the patient.

Imaging tests like CT and MRI help in visualizing the brain structure. This helps in detecting any structural damage or abnormalities that may be causing the fits.

Treatment Of Epilepsy And Convulsions

Once epilepsy has been diagnosed, a person may have to take medication every day. The type and frequency of medication depend on the person, their condition, and their doctor. Medications used to treat fits are called anticonvulsants. They are also called anti-seizure medications or anti-epileptic medications. Finding the right anti-epileptic can be a long and drawn out process. Some people may even need more than one anticonvulsant or may require additional medication apart from anticonvulsants. Remember to be patient, health can be an arduous journey.

Some people may not respond to medications. In such cases, specialists may suggest other treatment modalities such as surgery and novel therapies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Surgery for epilepsy is not as scary as it sounds. It is grounded in sound medical and scientific work. Epilepsy surgery is usually recommended to people with focal seizures (a single, clear, defined area of abnormal electrical discharges) which are not controlled by adequate drug therapy. The aim of surgery is a complete cessation of convulsions.

In people who are not candidates for surgery, newer neurostimulation techniques like TMS can be tried. Other ways to control and reduce the severity of convulsions is getting enough sleep, eating regular meals, following a ketogenic diet, exercising, reducing stress, and other lifestyle modifications.

Epilepsy is nothing to be scared of. It can disrupt normal life but with correct diagnosis and treatment, a person with epilepsy can live a full, safe, and satisfying life. Epilepsy may not always be completely curable but it can be controlled. Don’t be afraid of a diagnosis; it is the first step in a journey towards better health.

What You Need to Know About the Flu – How Does the Flu Spread?

What Is the Flu?

Each winter, millions of people suffer from the flu, which is a highly contagious infection. It spreads easily from person to person, mainly when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs cause the flu, which is the short name for influenza. The illness is usually a mild disease in healthy children, young adults, and middle-aged people. However, it can be life threatening in older adults and in people of any age who have chronic illnesses such as diabetes or heart, lung, or kidney diseases.
The flu is a respiratory infection caused by a variety of flu viruses. It differs in several ways from the common cold, which is a respiratory infection that is also caused by viruses. For example, people with colds rarely get fevers, headaches, or suffer from the extreme exhaustion that the flu viruses can cause.

What types of Flu are there?

The first flu virus was identified in the 1930s. Since then, scientists have classified three types of flu viruses based upon their protein composition. The types of flu virus include types A, B, and C. Type A viruses are found in many kinds of animals, including:

Ducks
Chickens
Pigs
Whales
Humans

Type B virus broadly circulates in humans. Type C has been found in humans, pigs, and dogs. Type C causes mild respiratory infections, but does not spark epidemics.
Type A influence is the most frightening of the three flu types. It is believed to be responsible for the global outbreaks of 1918, 1957, and 1968.

What are the first signs of the Flu

Common flu symptoms start quickly and can include:

Fever
Chills
Dry cough
Sore throat
Runny or stuffy nose
Headache
Muscle aches
Extreme fatigue.

Typically, the fever will begin to decline on the second or third day of the illness.

Is the Flu contagious?

Outbreaks usually begin suddenly and occurs mainly in the late fall and winter. The flu spreads through communities, creating an epidemic. During the epidemic, the number of cases peaks in about 3 weeks and subsidies after another 3 or 4 weeks. Half of the population of a community may be affected. Schools are an excellent place for flu viruses to attack and spread. Therefore, families with school-age children have more infections than other families, with an average of one-third of the family members becoming infected each year.

When is the Flu season?

Approximately 10 percent to 20 percent of Americans come down with the Flu between November and March (the season for this illness).

Complications

Besides the rapid start of the outbreaks and the large numbers of people affected, the flu is an important disease because it can cause serious complications. Most people who get it will get better within a week, although they may have a lingering cough and tire easily for a while longer. However, for elderly people, newborn babies, and people with certain chronic illnesses, the flu and its complications can be dangerous.

How does the Flu spread?

You can get the flu if someone around you who has it coughs or sneezes. Or, you can get it simply by touching a surface, like a telephone or doorknob, that has been contaminated by someone who has the flu. The viruses can pass through the air and enter your body through your nose or mouth, or if you've touched a contaminated surface, they can pass from your hand to your nose or mouth. You are at greatest risk of getting infected in highly populated areas, such as in crowded living conditions and in schools.

Why do I get the Flu?

It is estimated that 10 percent to 20 percent of Americans come down with the flu during each flu season, which typically lasts from November to March. Children are 2 to 3 times more likely than adults to get sick with the flu, and children frequently spread the virus to others. Although most people recover from the illness, it is estimated that in the United States more than 100,000 people are hospitalized and about 36,000 people die from this illness and its complications every year.

Medication for the Flu

Although the flu vaccine is the best flu prevention method, antiviral flu medicine is also available by prescription. Flu medicines include:

Tamiflu® (oseltamivir)
Flumadine® (rimantadine)
Symmetrel® (amantadine)
Relenza® (zanamivir).

Tamiflu, Flumadine and Symmetrel may be used by adults and children who are 1 year of age and older. The drugs can be used for both prevention and to reduce the duration of fever and other flu symptoms.

Tips on how to prevent the Flu

A flu shot can greatly lower your chances of getting the flu. In fact, most illnesses and deaths that are caused by the flu could have been preceded by a yearly flu shot. Medicare covers the cost, and many private health insurance plans also pay for the flu shot. You can get a flu shot at:

Your doctor's office
Your local health department
Other healthcare providers.

It is important to note that there are no vaccines that will give you complete protection, and the flu shot is no exception. In older people and those with certain chronic illnesses, the flu shot is often less effective in preventing the flu. However, the flu shot will help to reduce associated symptoms and the risk of serious illness and death.

Summary

Key information about the flu includes:
The flu can be quite dangerous for people who are 65 years of age and older
It can be invented
Each fall, a flu shot is necessary for people in high-risk groups
The shot is covered by Medicare
The shot is safe and it can not cause the flu
The flu shot and the pneumococcal vaccine can be given at the same time.