Stroke Rehabilitation Treatment Options

Stroke rehabilitation strives to help individuals who have suffered a stroke relearn verbal and daily living skills. The extent of rehabilitation depends on many factors such as the extent of damage to the brain, the knowledge of the rehabilitation team, the amount of support from family members and how soon recovery training has started.

According to MayoClinic, stroke rehabilitation should consist of a team of rehabilitation members from a variety of specialties such as physicians, nurses, speech therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, social workers, psychologists, therapeutic recreation workers and voluntary counselors. Physicians and nurseries that treat stroke patients specialize in neurology and rehabilitation. Speech therapists help those who have had a stroke regain communication skills. Occupational therapists can help individuals regain skills that make them fully functional in society. Physical therapists help people regain mobility. Social workers and psychologists can deal with social and emotional issues that affect stroke patients. Vocational counselors can help individuals regain skills to reenter the work after they have suffered a stroke. Therapeutic recreational therapists help individuals relearn hobbies that they were participants in before having a stroke.

WebMD states that stroke rehabilitation should occur while the patient is still in the hospital. The sooner the strike victim starts recovery the better. The best chance for patients to rehabilitate occurs within the first couple of months after a stroke has occurred. Most hospitals will offer five or six therapeutic sessions a week which lasts for approximately three hours. The length of a recovery program depends on the amount of damage the individual endured as a result of the stroke. Often it is a lifelong process although the majority of rehabilitation will occur during the first few weeks that follow a stroke.

Problems seen in stroke sufferers rely heavily on which side of the brain was affected during a stroke and the amount of damage caused by it. Often there are problems with body movements. Individuals suffering from a stroke may not be able to turn toward the side. They may also have trouble walking or getting up from a chair. They may need others to help them with daily living skills such as brushing their teeth, eating with utensils, drinking from a cup or picking up objects. Language and thinking is also frequently impaired in stroke sufferers. Emotional problems are often seen in these individuals due to fears, sadness or anger.

Stroke rehabilitation can help individuals who have suffered a stroke regain daily living skills and help them with emotional and physical problems. Progress takes time and patience in stroke sufferers.