Recovering From Metatarsal Fractures

Have you ever had a broken foot? What about a metatarsal? Well, if you had, you will well know how painfull and difficult the recovery of metarsal fractures is. Many time, patients getting very depressed and very down, because recovery is not easy, and sometimes it can take a long time. Metatarsal stress fractures were first described in 1855 and termed march fractures” since they commonly occurred in military recruits. Metatarsal stress fractures (march fractures) usually occur in runners and in poorly conditioned patients who walk long distances carrying a load (eg, new recruit soldiers); they most commonly occur in the 2nd metatarsal. Risk factors include a cavus foot (high arch), shoes with inadequate shock-absorbing qualities, and osteoporosis; these fractures also may be a sign of the female athlete triad (amenorrhea, eating disorder, and osteoporosis). Metatarsal stress fracture may not become apparent on x-rays until a few weeks after the injury.

Metatarsal stress fractures are more difficult to diagnose. Sometimes even with a foot x-ray, they may not be apparent. Metatarsal stress fractures are also called “march fractures” because they were common in soldiers who did a lot of marching. The second metatarsal bone is the one that is most often affected, followed by the third then the fourth. Metatarsal stress fractures generally involve a single metatarsal, usually the second or third . They typically result from training errors such as too rapid an increase in mileage in a runner.

Pain typically stops before healing is complete. This process can take several weeks to many months, depending on the type and severity of the fracture and how well a patient follows medical advice. Pain is the most common symptom of a fractured foot. Standing or walking can be very painful. Pain in the top of your foot and toes, these types of injuries apparently often go unreported. Pain on palpation will usually determine the site of injury. Weight bearing and continued loading will reproduce the pain.

If talk about metatarsal treatment well there is not a lot of treatment mainly we want to focus on limitation of activity. Treatment involves rest of the injured bone, followed by a gradual return to the sport once free of pain. Recent evidence supports the use of air splinting to reduce pain and decrease the time until return to full participation or intensity of exercise. Treatment for a metatarsal stress fractures usually consists of rest, elevation, and ice initially. Sometimes a compression bandage is applied to help reduce the swelling. Treatment for stress fractures consists of relative or absolute rest. This will depend on the bone or bones involved, and the severity and stage of the fracture. Treatment for a metatarsal stress fractures usually consists of rest, elevation, and ice initially. Sometimes a compression bandage is applied to help reduce the swelling.

Treatment of a traumatic fracture depends on the location and extent of the break and whether it is displaced. Surgery is sometimes required. Treatment with a rigid-soled shoe and relative rest for 4 to 6 weeks should provide relief of symptoms. The patient may need some type of orthosis, and the orthotic fitting may require a more specialized evaluation.