Neck and Shoulder Pain Relief From Specialist Chiropractors

There are many ways in which we deal with pain, but when people suffer from neck and shoulder problems there are ways in which the discomfort can be controlled.

Some specialist chiropractors within the Warwickshire area provide effective pain relief that is also proven to cure neck and shoulder problems. This can make people live a fulfilling life without restrictions for both themselves and their family.

Regardless of how your injury has come about, whether you were involved in a car accident or fallen awkwardly, there is help available. Pain relief comes in a variety of forms from specialist chiropractors including physiotherapy and cold laser therapy.

These two methods of pain relief are most effective when done so by professionals. They understand how to really help you managing your pain relief and there before you get on the road to recovery.

Chiropractors understand the workings of how to effectively control and treat those suffering from any neck and shoulder pain in the Warwickshire area from whiplash to dislocation. They will be able to advise on the best course of treatment through thorough consultations and properly diagnose you based on your symptoms.

Whether you suffer from upper back pain, neck pain or shoulder pain, there are things that can be done to help ease it. By seeing a professional chiropractor, you will be in the safest hands, with effective treatments that in return will help you return to a normal life.

People do not understand the severity of neck and shoulder pain and should always seek professional help. Leaving a condition can, in time, increase the damage and cause other problems such as headaches. If you stay in the Warwickshire and West Midlands, look out for the chiropractors that offer alternative pain relief.

Craniosacral Therapy and Head Shaking Syndrome in Horses

I was out in Chesapeake the other day working on a gorgeous thoroughbred horse, a grandson of Secretariat, who had the unmistakable look of Nasrullah in his eye. He was well over 17 hands and put together nicely. He nearly walked over 3’6″ fences I was told. But, he was being plagued by a condition known as Head Shaking, which some have said is Trigeminal Neuralgia.  

Headshaking syndrome in horses is a perplexing challenge. It is found all over the planet, I am told it is mostly seasonal, and afflicts mainly geldings who are over 10. Well, that would fit the bill perfectly for Charlie. It is characterized predominantly by vertical head tossing or flicking and muzzle irritation observed as rubbing on objects and sneezing but the cause is actually unknown.

If Charlie is suffering from Trigeminal neuralgia, then he may have to deal with sudden bursts of facial pain. The current opinion is now in favor of a neurovascular conflict: an artery that has an offending contact with the trigeminal nerve root.  Trigeminal neuralgia is diagnosed as having pain with distribution along one or more of the trigeminal nerves, the pain is sudden, intense, precipitated by triggers, has periods of remission, no neurological deficits and all other causes have been excluded. I worked with humans who have been afflicted by this condition and I can tell you there is a great deal of suffering.

There is an assumption now in the medical field that a horse that is suffering from head-shaking syndrome is having the same syndrome cluster-tic syndrome that my patients have. The good news is that one session of craniosacral therapy totally relieved Charlie of the syndrome. Now it may not “hold”. But, I believe we are on the right path. Consider craniosacral therapy for your horse. http://www.lyonsinstitute.com/equinemassage.html

Gingivitis Treat it Naturally With Homeopathy

I love those "itis" diseases. You know, the ones that place "itis" after the noun that determines the location of the disease. Since it is means "inflammation of", it's easy to determine the disease. Tendonitis = inflammation of the tendons. Tonsillitis = inflammation of the tonsils. Here, gingivitis = inflammation of the gingiva. By breaking down the word into its components, it not only gives us information, but comfort in knowing that the disease is often not as serious as it sounds.

So it is with gingivitis. Generally, it is not a disease of severity in our world today. There are, however, varying degrees of severity. If it's a mild case, then herbs can be curative.

One of the easiest ways to treat gingivitis is with Myrrh. Yes, the gift given by the king at Jesus' birth. That in itself has value in my book. Another important ingredient is Propolis, which is found in honey. Both are available in high quality toothpaste purchased from a reputable health food store. Having said this, in my estimation, it's always better to make what ever you can at home. (No hidden ingredients for the sake of shelf life or economy.) If you choose this path, both of these herbs can be purchased in tincture form, again from a health food store. Place 10 drops of each in a glass of water, then swish in the mouth 2-3 times per day, more often if the problem is severe.

So, local measures of treatment are important. However, if the gingivitis is of an ulcerative nature with severe erosion and halitosis, the problem needs to be approached with a greater degree of person-specific treatment. Homeopathic remedies have repeated success in treating this bacterial infection without antibiotics. Let's see what is available.

The key homeopathic remedy for gingivitis is Mercurius sol 30. This is of particular value when the tongue is heavily covered. It should be taken thrice daily for one week. Then one week off and then resumed again the following week. Alternate weeks on and off until results are complete, but no longer than over a period of 2 months. If the tongue is not covered, then use Nitricum acidum 30 thrice daily in the same fashion.

If improvement is noted, but is not complete, it is best to contact a homeopath for an in person or phone appointment. Homeopathy has the ability to address even the most severe cases of mouth disease. It is safe, gentle, effective and carries no side effects. The next time your mouth speaks of illness, consider homeopathy; the world accepted medicine worth spreading the word about.

Some Like It Hot, Some Cold – Understanding When To Use Hot and Cold Therapy For Injury

When To Use Hot Or Cold Therapy

It can really get confusing when one has a muscle strain, sprained ankle and other similar maladies and is told to use “cold therapy” and “heat therapy”. The mantras are “only use cold”, “use cold for first 24-48 hours”, “don’t use cold use warm moist heat to stop your pain”. How is one to know what to do?

Often lost in the determination is what is the condition of the patient at the time of choosing a hot or cold modality. Because one broke an ankle, tore a ligament, or suffered an injury months ago does not mean the condition is “chronic” since it happened months ago. Often the process of healing makes many situations “acute” to the moment.

Let’s examine whether to use hot or cold, but more importantly, why to use the hot or cold therapy.

Generally speaking immediately following acute injury the body goes into what is called an “inflammatory response” and the area gets red, gets hot and swells. During this time you don’t want to inflame an inflammatory reaction and make it worse so the general rule is use cold therapy (cryotherapy). The cold actually:

  • reduces the edema,
  • lessens the pain,
  • cools the temperature of the injured area, and
  • stops the inflammatory response.

The inflammatory response is natural and helpful but it can cause more injury especially in cases such as spinal cord damage, or brain injury where the swelling causes additional injury to healthy tissues.

After the swelling has stopped, the pain subsided some, and the area cooled down, then warm, moist heat is indicated ( not dry heat ) and that occurs generally when a patient is trying to regain motion, function. As the patient tries to regain full range of motion pain inhibits it and it is now that heat helps:

  • reduce pain
  • increase blood flow for faster healing
  • helps extend range of motion when used complementary with exercise.

Now here’s the “sleight of hand” that is often confusing to injured patients. Each time a patient goes through an exercise routine then new/old tissues are actually re-injured. That in and of itself re-excites the body’s inflammatory response so in essence the patient now has a “new injury” brought on by the rehabilitation process. So immediately after exercising it’s best to use cold therapy, not warm moist, as the area being exercised is now in a new “acute” injury process. Hot & Cold therapy is an example of ” complementary ” medicine to improve patient outcomes.

Epilepsy Facts

More than 2.5 million Americans suffer from some type of epilepsy. Epilepsy is defined as any condition that is characterized by seizures. Seizures come in many forms but all have one thing in common, abnormal electrical brain activity. This abnormal activity causes an involuntary change in body movement or function. There are many different kinds of seizures and they vary in intensity and duration. An estimated $ 15.5 billion annually is spent on medical costs and lost wages associated with epilepsy.

Two main types of seizures

The two main types of seizures are primary generalized seizures and partial seizures. Primary generalized seizures include both sides of the brain. Partial seizures include a localized portion of the brain. People with partial seizures often have seizures that go unnoticed by those around them. They may appear to stare off into space or blink rapidly. In contrast, a person having a primary generalized seizure may cry out, have ridged muscle jerks, fall down or appear to pass out.

Not all people who experience seizures have epilepsy. Seizures can be caused by high fever, low blood sugar, withdrawal from drugs or alcohol and as the result of a concussion. People who suffer a seizure from one of these should be treated for the condition not for epilepsy, especially if there is no indication of prior seizures.

It is known that several conditions and events can increase the risk of developing epilepsy. These include oxygen deprivation during birth, brain infections, stroke, certain neurological diseases, brain tumors and genetic disorders. Although we know these factors can increase the risk, in over two thirds of all cases of epilepsy no underlining cause can be identified.

Treatment options

There are several treatment options for those suffering from epilepsy depending on the type and cause. The primary course of action is antiepileptic drugs. There are many different types of drugs available and a healthcare provider will work with the patient to find the best medication that will control the seizures. Close monitoring after starting a medication is necessary to access the drug's effectiveness and to control side effects. About two thirds of all patients treated with drugs are fully controlled.

Surgery is an option for those who suffer from partial epilepsy. Since the abnormal brain activity is localized, surgery to remove the affected area has been shown to less or wholly stop seizures. This type of surgery is commonly used to treat seizures that are focused on the temporal lobe.

When medications are not affective or surgery is not an option, other methods are often considered. An electrical device implanted into the vagus nerve in the neck has been used. Some people find a ketogenic diet, high in fat and low in carbohydrates and calories to be of assistance. Seeing a physician who specializes in epilepsy can help find the best plan of action that works to control seizures and allows the patient to live a normal life.

How To Write More Powerful Reports

There is one key difference between reports and most other forms of business writing, and we get a hint of that in the word, “report.” Whereas with many other forms of written comms you can be a little creative and put your own slant on your words, in a report you must not. Not in theory, anyway.

In a report, you’re supposed to report – not embellish, embroider, influence, etc. Just the facts and nothing but the facts.

This does not, however, mean that reports need to be dull and boring. It does, however, mean that you can’t make the content more interesting than it really is. Impossible? No, it just takes some good organization and clear writing.

Before we go any further, there are numerous books and training courses on the market that teach you the formalities and practicalities of report writing. Some are more long-winded than others. Most of them are good.

Here in this article I can’t do what other writers do in a book, so if you need to write reports a lot, I recommend that you buy one or two of the most popular books and study them. What I’m doing here then, is to highlight the points I think are most important to help you make your reports more readable, and the information in them come across more vividly.

If you work in a larger organization, there will probably be set formats for reports, at least for the internal variety. Whether you like them or not you’re normally obliged to stick to them. However the way you roll out and write your content is still up to you.

So what are the key points to focus on?

1. Write for your reader

Don’t allow yourself to fall into “business” jargon and phrasing no matter how much you or other people may feel it’s more appropriate. It isn’t. Use language and tone of voice that your key readers will feel comfortable with. If you don’t know what they feel comfortable with, find out. It’s well worth taking the trouble, because it will make the report much more enjoyable for them to read – a good reflection on you.

If your report is to be read by a wide variety of different audiences, focus your language on the most important groups. Ensure that less topic-literate readers are catered for by using discreet explanations of technical terms or perhaps a short glossary of terms as an appendix within the report.

2. Organize your information sensibly

Start by writing yourself out a list of headings which start at the beginning and finish with the conclusions of your information. If you must include a lot of background information before you get into the “meat” of the information, section it off clearly with headings that say that it’s background (“Research Project Objectives,” “Research Methods Used To Collate Information,” “Personnel Involved In Questionnaire,” etc.) so those who know it all already can skip straight to the important stuff.

Make sure your headings “tell the story” so someone glancing through those alone will get the basic messages. (You’ll find that busy executives will thank you for doing this, especially when they have 16 other, similar reports to read in a crowded commuter train on the way into a meeting to discuss all of them.) Then fill in the details under each heading as concisely as you can.

3. Use an “executive summary” to tell it in a nutshell

Depending on the nature of your report you may be expected to include an executive summary, or at least an introduction that captures the key points of your information. The objective of this is to give the reader the key issues as quickly as possible. Write this after you’ve done the body of the report, not before. Use your list of headings as a guide.

Keep strictly to the facts – this is still part of the report, not your interpretation of it. Strip each sentence down to bare bones with minimal adjectives and adverbs. Use short words and sentences. Don’t just get to the point – start with it and stick to it.

4. If your interpretation is called for, keep it separate

If part of your remit is to comment on the report and/or its conclusions, keep this separate from the main body of information. (Blocked off in a box or under a clearly separated heading will do.)

Naturally as you’re professional you will be as objective as possible. But if you do feel strongly one way or another, ensure that your argument is put as reasonably as possible without going on for pages and pages. Remember, brief is beautiful, although it’s harder to write briefly (and include all the important points) than it is to produce words in abundance.

5. Don’t get carried away with illustrations

Graphs and charts are great to illustrate important issues and like the man said, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” However ensure that those you use are of a level of complexity that will be understood by the least topic-literate of your readers. There’s nothing more irritating than a graph that takes you 20 minutes to decipher. It’s not so much a case that readers are too stupid to understand a complex graph, as it is that they don’t want to spend too much time working it out. The easier/quicker you make it for readers to understand and assimilate your information, the more successful your report.

Try, also, to keep graphs and charts physically adjacent to the text that talks about the same thing. There’s nothing more irritating for the reader if they have to keep flipping from front to back of a document. (When in doubt, think of someone reading your report on that crowded commuter train.)

6. Cut the clutter

Still on that topic, try to avoid including too many diverse elements in your report, no matter how long and involved it is. If you do need to include appendices and various bits of background material, research statistics, etc., make sure they’re neatly labeled and contained at the back of your document.

As I suggested earlier, don’t ask readers to skip back and forth, directing them with asterisks and other reference directing symbols. If you’re writing a medical report or paper then you’re obliged to include these when quoting references from other papers, but please keep even these to a minimum. They’re very distracting and can break your reader’s concentration.

7. Take some trouble to make it look nice

I know you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but people do. Like it or not. According to UK Image consultant Tessa S, when you walk into a meeting, 55% of your first impression of someone is reflected exclusively in the way you’re dressed. Documents fall into the same hole. So how your document looks goes a long way to creating the right impression of your work, and of you.

Obviously if a report is due to go outside your organization and particularly to clients or customers, you will be careful to ensure it’s polished and clearly branded with your corporate identity and all that. However, how an internal report looks is important, too, although your Head of Finance might have apoplexy if you bind it in expensive glossy card. Be sensible with the internal variety – neat, understated, groomed looks don’t have to cost much but they “say” a lot about the value of your report (and you.)

8. A minute on minutes

I think minute-taking is a horrible job, having done so for 6 years while on a charity fundraising committee. And being useless at handwriting (thanks to decades of computers and typewriters) never mind shorthand (was thrown out of secretarial school after 3 weeks) I struggled for months to scribble everything down to price later, until I realized that my brain was a far more efficient filter of information.

At the end of each agenda item, I asked myself the classic reporter questions of “who, what, where, when, why, how and how much.” All I had to do was jot down a few words and when I got home to my trusty PC, I could expand those into realistic summaries of what went on. As much of the dialogue in meetings is either unnecessary, repetitive, or both, simply use your brain as a filter. That’s what it’s trained to do for you in your day-to-day life, so it works for meetings too.

One word of warning though; don’t wait too long before your work up your minutes. Another trick the brain does is to forget after a few hours or a day or so at most…

How Needles Help A Stroke Patient To Recover

Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM) is usually regarded as an alternative treatment. Patients will seek help from TCM doctors only when they can not be treated by western medicine.

Lately, a growing number of western doctors have started to learn and use TCM to complement their western medical knowledge to treat their patients.

Acupuncture is a major component of TCM to fight pain and illness. It has been practiced in China since 2500 BC. It involves inserting thin, metallic disposable needles into certain points of the body. These needles are then turned by hand or stimulated by machine. The aim is to balance of qi or "life force" in Chinese. TCM believes that qi flows in the body to keep us going, and it must be kept in good balance.

Acupuncture can have any one of the six effects:

– Relieve pain through raising the level of endorphins, a painkiller released by the body;

– Give a feeling of sedation;

– Adjust the body's homeostasis or the balance opposing systems such as a respiration rate and body temperature;

– Enhance immune system;

– Provide an anti-inflammatory result;

– Furnish an anti-allergy effect.

Acupuncture is beneficial in treating muscular pains, joint pains, nerve pains, migraines, insomnia and anxiety. The World Health Organization (WHO) lists several conditions which can be evaluated by acupuncture, including rhinitis, headaches and facial palsy.

However, there are skeptics, too.

For instance, a German study in 2005 suggested that putting needles into the body causes pain relief, regardless of where they are placed because of the place effect – the patients believed they would be get better. This is of course not true from the perspective of TCM because the position of placing the needles is very important in treating illness.

Success stories do exist as well.

Here is a case study of a stroke patient, aged 71, who was treated with acupuncture while taking the western medicine.

A stroke left the right side of Steve's body paralyzed. He could not turn over in bed. When he started acupuncture treatment with a TCM physician, he could not even lift his legs.

After 8 sessions, he could turn over in bed. And after 20 sessions, he was able to walk with the aid of a stick. Now, he can walk slowly for a whole hour.

His speech has become clear, too and he can swallow now. He can eat harder foods including apples.

He is taking anti-coagulants as well as drugs to manage his high cholesterol levels and hypertension. Both of these are risk factors for heart disease. He is also doing 2 sessions of physiotherapy a week.

Even a few sessions before the 40 sessions prescribed for stroke patients, he has already begun to return to normal life.

Female Alopecia – Information, Causes, Prevention, and Treatment Options

Female Alopecia

1.-Introduction
2.-Growth cycles
3.-Main Causes
4.-Secondary Causes
5.-Topical treatments
6.-Oral treatments
7.-Cosmetic treatments
8.-Conclusion

Introduction

With different colors, styles and variations, young or mature, male or female, the hair has an important role in a person's image.

While advertising for products that "strengthen the hair" are almost always male-oriented, it may seem that women do not suffer from alopecia. The reality is that over two thirds of women face the challenges of hair loss at some point in their lives.

Many women find this very disturbing, perhaps more than men. In addition, the female physiology is unique, and factors such as menstrual cycles, pregnancy and menopause are particularly important.

For some women, hair loss can be genetic; however, many of the causes of female hair loss are treatable.

Without a doubt, the physical appearance of women depends very much on their hair. For many women, their hair is a sign of youth and vitality.

Hair structure:

The external portion of the hair, called the stem, is the part of the hair that we see and style. In reality it is dead tissue produced by hair follicles, small bag-shaped structures located deep in the scalp. Each hair is enclosed within a follicle.

The average head has 100,000 hairs. At the base of the follicle is the oval shaped root, which is responsible for the growth of hair. In the lower portion of this is the papilla, which contains blood capillaries that provide blood to each hair.

As hair grows, the cells move towards the surface of the skin and become a protein called keratin, being replaced by new cells. Keratin is the same protein found in the nails.

The stem is composed of 3 layers: the cuticle, the cortex and medulla. The cuticle, or outer layer, consist of small cells known as scales. The cuticle serves as a case for the cortex, the thickest portion of the stem, composed of cells arranged in the form of tobacco leaves. The cortex holds the pigment that gives hair its color. The medulla is composed of cells with the form of a case and is located in the center. The spaces between cells in the medulla influence the refraction of light in tone and hair.

Glands and muscles

The hair is lubricated by oily secretions from the sebaceous glands, located on the sides of most follicles. Surrounding these glands and the rest of the follicle, there are groups of muscles (arrector pili) that allow the hair to stand up when a person is cold or afraid.

Cycles of growth

The average head has 100,000 hairs. Hair grows and is renewed regularly. Normally, 50 to 100 hairs fall out every day. If there are no problems, this loss will most likely go un-noticed.

Hair grows about 1 cm per month, although this growth Declines as we age. Every hair on your head remains there for about two to six years, and during most of this time it is growing. When the hair is older it enters a resting stage in which it remains on the head, but stops growing. At the end of this phase the hair falls out. Typically, the follicle replicates the hair in about six months, but many factors can disrupt this cycle. The result may be that the hair falls out soon or is not replaced. Normally 90% of hair is in continuous growth (anagen phase) that lasts 2 to 6 years. 10% of hair is in a resting phase, which lasts about 2-3 months. At the end of this stage it is normal for the hair to fall out (telogen phase).

As the hair falls out is replaced by a new hair from the hair follicle, located under the skin. Through a person's life span no new hair follicles are formed. Blonds have the most hair (140,000 hairs) followed by dark hair (105,000) and red hair (90,000). As we age the rate of hair growth diminishes, leading to a progressive thinning of hair. Since the hair is composed of protein (keratin), and this material is also in the nails, it is essential that all people ingest or eat an abundant amount of protein to maintain the healthy hair production. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, Cereals, nuts and soy.

Main causes

Androgenetic alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss. It is mainly determined by 3 factors: aging, hormones, and heredity.

Most people experience some hair loss as they age. The result may be a partial or total baldness. Men are much more likely than women to experience baldness and hair loss when they get older, but "female baldness" can also be inherited, which can cause modest or significant hair loss in women as they age. Hair loss is initially interested between 25 and 30 years of age. In female hair loss, hair is replaced by increasingly thinner and shorter hair. Hair may even become transparent.

Usually, hair loss in women is less obvious than in men. Also, the pattern in which the hair falls out is different. It is most noticeable in the hair part, as well as the crown of the head, additionally the frontal hair line is retained. It is inherited from both father and mother.

About 50% of women who experience hair loss have "female baldness". In these cases there is an abundance of dihydrotestosterone (male hormone) in the hair follicle. The conversion of testosterone to DHT is regulated by the 5-alpha-reductase enzyme in the scalp. Over time, the action of DHT degrades, and shortens the growth phase of the follicle (Anagen). Although the follicle is technically alive, it grows less and less each time. Some follicles just die, but most become smaller and thinner. As the Anagenic Phase remains very short, hair gradually thins and falls out until it becomes so fine that it can no longer sustain daily hair combing. Baldness turns a long, thick pigmented hair into thin, clear and light hair. Neverheless, the sebaceous glands attached to the follicle remain the same size and continue to produce the same amount of sebum. When a medical treatment (flutamide, cyproterone or spironolactone) is able to reduce the male hormones, the sebaceous glands become smaller, and reduce their production of this hormone in the sebum causing less damage.

There also seems to be an immune factor in baldness. Basically, the immune system begins to target hair follicles in the areas of alopecia. The rise in male hormones (DHT) during puberty starts this process.

Secondary causes

A wide variety of factors can cause hair loss, often temporary, in women:

Birth Control Pills

The pills contain two ingredients, a synthetic estrogen and progestin. Women who experience hair loss while taking oral contraceptives are predisposed to a hereditary progressive hair thinning. This can be accelerated by the effects of the male hormone possessing some progestagens. If this happens, it is advisable to change to another type of oral contraceptive. Also, when a woman stops using certain oral contraceptives, she can be notice hair loss 2-3 months later. This lasts about 6 months and usually ceases. It would be similar to hair loss experienced after giving birth.

Iron deficiency anemia

Lack of iron causes hair loss in men as well as women. However, in women the problem is more prevalent, particularly in those with long or heavy menstrual cycles. The lack of iron can be detected easily with analysis, and corrected with medical treatment.

Diet

A diet low in protein can also cause hair loss, as can low iron intake. Vegetarians, people with diets low in protein, and patients with anorexia nervosa may be a protein deficient. When this occurs the body helps to conserve protein by moving hair growth to the resting stage. This can lead to heavy hair loss about 3 months after the hair growth enters the resting stage. When the hair is folded, it comes out easily at the root. This process is reversible with medical treatment, which requires an adequate intake of protein.

Post-partum

Some women lose large amounts of hair 2-3 months after giving birth. When a woman gives birth, too many hairs enter the resting phase. 2-3 months after she may notice a large number of hairs in the comb or brush after combing her hair. The hair loss can last about 6 months. The problem, in most cases, is resolved after appropriate medical treatment. Not all new mothers will suffer from this experience, and not all women will notice hair loss with each pregnancy.

Stress and illness

You may start to lose hair 1-3 months after a stressful situation, such as major surgery. High fevers, infections, severe or chronic diseases can also result in hair loss.

Thyroid Disease

An underactive or hyperactive thyroid can cause hair loss. These diseases are diagnosed by clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. These cases require special handling.

Medicines

Some drugs used in cancer chemotherapy cause hair cells to stop their division, resulting in thinner more fragile hair that easily breaks as it emerges from the scalp. This phenomenon occurs 1-3 weeks after the start of anticancer treatment. The patient can lose 90% of their hair. In most patients, hair grows back when anticancer treatment ends.

Also, many popular medications can cause hair loss.

Drugs that reduce cholesterol: clofibrate (Atromis-S) and gemfibrozil (Lopid).
rugs for Parkinson's: levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa).
Anti-ulcer drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet), ranetidina (Zantac) and famotidine (Pepcid).
Anticoagulants: Coumarina and Heparin.
Anti gotoso agents: Allopurinol (Loporin, Zyloprim, Zyloric).
Anti-arthritic: penicillamina, auranofin (Ridaura), indomethacin (Inacid), naproxen (Naprosyn), Sulindac (Clinoril) and methotrexate (Folex).
erivatives of Vitamin-A: isotretinoin (Accutane, Roacutan) and etretinato (Tegison, Tigason).
Anti-convulsants / antiepileptics: trimethadione (Tridion).
Anti-depressants: tricyclics, amphetamines.
Beta blockers for hypertension: atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal) and timolol (Blocadren).
Anti-thyroid: carbimazole, iodine, thiocianato, thiouracilo.
Other anticoagulants, male hormones (anabolic steroids).

Alopecia Areata

A common disease that causes patches of hair loss on the scalp and other body parts. It affects men and women of all ages, but more commonly youth. The affected follicles significantly diminish their production of hair. They become very small and produce hair that is very noticeable. These follicles are in a resting state, and at any time can resume their normal activities after receiving a signal. Some people develop only a few bald spots that return to normal in about a year. Some people loose all of the hair on their head (alopecia totalis). In other people all body hair is lost (alopecia universal). It is believed that alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease in which the body mistakenly produces antibodies against the hair follicle (autoallergic). Anxiety and nervousness may trigger the disease or prevent it from healing. Treatment includes injecting cortisone, or by applying Minoxidil, cyclosporine, steroid creams or Anthralin to the affected area. In selected cases, UVA treatment, or the application of dibenciprona on the lesions is used in order to produce an allergic eczema to stimulate the resting follicle.

Tinea / ringworm

A fungal infection on the scalp. Small patches can cause flaking and some hair loss.

Inappropriate hair care

Many women use chemical treatments on their scalp, such as dyes, highlights, and perms. Chemical treatments can damage the hair if done incorrectly. The hair becomes weak and breaks when these substances are applied too often, left on too long, bleaching previously bleached hair, or when two or more procedures are performed in the same day. If the hair becomes too porous and dull by excessive exposure to chemical treatments, it is advisable to suspend these treatments until the hair has recovered. Shampoo, brushing and combing are necessary for proper care of the hair, but if done excessively or inappropriately can damage hair, causing it to break at the stalk, or produce split ends. You can use a conditioner or hair repair product after shampoo to reduce the force required to comb the hair and make it more manageable. When there are split ends, and hair that is difficult to comb, it is advisable to use hair repair products with silicone serums. Excess water should not be discharged and rubbed vigorously with a towel. When the hair is wet its structure is more fragile, and viguous combing or brushing should be avoided. Forget the old recommendation of combing or brushing in excess as well, because it damages hair. Use combs with widely spaced teeth and thin bristle brushes, preferably natural (wild boar bristle brushes for example). The hairstyles that require tension on the hair like curls and braids should be alternated with loose hair styles to avoid the constant "pull" that can produce hair loss, especially on the sides of the scalp.

Topical Treatments

1. Minoxidil. Is a vasodilator agent that has been used orally in the treatment of hypertension and is now widely used in treating various types of alopecia. In general, 1 ml of lotion is applied twice a day (every 12 hours) to dry hair, as humidity increases the penetration of the product several times. Works better in young men than in women (20 years), especially in those with mild hair loss (thinning) on ​​the crown, or a small bald patch 3-4 cm, but also is functional for a receding hairline. The response to Minoxidil varies from individual to individual. Treatment should be 2 to 5 years. The scalp will begin beginning to grow more hair from the small thin hairs. Minoxidil causes hair becomes thicker and healthier. The income is better for people suffering from hair loss for less than 2 years. Most see fuzz growing in the first few months. Some experience more hair loss after the first applications. This is due to the old hair should fall out in order for new hair to grow. Positive results can be seen in 4-8 months, although the maximum effects of Minoxidil are reached between 12-14 months.

2. Pyrimidine N-oxides. A generic class of hair tonics similar to Minoxidil (2.4-Diaminopyrimidine Aminexil-3-oxide). The results in more than 250 men and women include an 8% increase in hair growth after 6 weeks of treatment, compared to a decrease in the rate of hair growth with a placebo.

3. Tretinoin. Has been used for years in the treatment of acne. It is also a hair tonic in appropriate doses, particularly in combination with Minoxidil. If implemented together, first apply the Minoxidil, wait for it to dry (usually 15-30 minutes) and then apply Tretinoin. Tretinoin should be applied only at night. A slight irritation to the skin of the scalp is expected, especially at the beginning of the treatment.

4. Topical estrogen. Solutions of dienestrol or progesterone may be applied daily for 6-12 months.

5. Natural treatments. There are many treatments with vitamins, sulfur amino acids (cysteine, methionine, tiazolidin carboxylic acid), minerals (zinc) and plant extracts (Indian horse chestnut, calendula) that are useful as dietary supplements and promote healthier hair. Sulfur favors the formation of keratin, the protein that gives structure to the hair. The plant extracts act to stimulate the circulation and revitalize the hair follicle. Zinc gluconate is an astringent and reduces sebaceous secretion by inhibiting the production of DHT when applied topically. Amniotic fluid and tricosacarides hydrate and stimulate the follicle.

6. Others. Lately, lotions containing superoxide dismutase (copper peptide ligands) are being used to strengthen and activate the growth of hair. This is based on the fact that there are chemical messengers in the body that send signals to hair follicles to start the Anagen and telogen phases. In this sense, focused more towards the telogen phase (resting phase), while nitric oxide causes the hair to enter the anagen (growth) phase. Obviously, the treatments should stimulate the levels of nitric oxide and reduce the levels of superoxide radicals used in superoxide dismutase and antioxidant agents.

Oral treatments

"Dietary supplements (vitamins, sulfur amino aids) Although androgenetic alopecia is not due to lack of vitamins, it is suggested that certain sulfur amino acid supplements (arginine, cysteine), vitamins and minerals (biotin, iron, folic acid) favor capillary nutrition, reduce fat, and promote the synthesis of the protein that gives structure to the hair (keratin) Many of these compounds have an antioxidant action.

"Antiandrogens.Request the male hormone (DHT) that causes baldness. DHT is an androgen (male hormone) competing for a place in the hair follicle receptors.If follicle receptors are occupied by other agents, DHT can not enter the hair follicle and thenfore does not mention its aggressive action. The problem is that by blocking DHT in other parts of the body signs of feminization may show in men. In contrast, for women this block is less problematic.

"Zinc. Affects hormone levels when taken orally and inhibits the production of DHT when applied topically.

"Espirolactona. Habitually used as a diuretic." It is one of the most powerful antiandrogens, which can cause hair loss. of 50 to 100 mg per day. It can alter the menstrual cycle and increase bleeding in some patients, but is generally well tolerated.

"(Cyproterone acetate) is a derivative of an anti-progesterone with antiandrogenic effects." It is used for the control of androgenetic alopecia in women only. at least 12 months and often requires 2 years for improvement. The result is more favorable if treatment is started within the first two years of the sunset of alopecia.

"flutamide. Another antiandrogic indicated for women. The treatment lasts 1-2 years.

Ketoconazole is an antifungal agent that has antiandrogenic properties. In men the treatment can be very effective with Finasteride, a drug normally used to treat hypertrophy of the prostate.

Cosmetic treatments

Cosmetic treatments include creative hairstyles, wigs, and hair transplants. To reduce the visual effect of the thinning hair, camouflage methods can be used.

Keeping the hair short, will make it appear less patched. This will also make it easier to maintain. Longer hair produces bunches and locks of hair that are separated, showing large areas of the scalp.

A skilled hairdresser can disguise thin hair in certain areas. If the hair is thin at the hair line, the hair line and extends to the temples, ask your hairdresser to cut your hair short in front, and leave it longer at the temples.

If your hair is thinner on the crown of your head, keep hair short, about neck length. Long hair is heavier, and this pulls hair, separating it at the crown and showing more of the bald area. If you still have a reasonably thick hair on the roof of the head, leave it long and cover the bald patches.

If the hair is very thin is more difficult to cover up alopecia areas. You can try a gentile perm to increase the hair volume.

If you have dark hair, you can try to lighten it a bit to reduce the contrast between the remaining hair and scalp, so making the skin less noticeable.

A cosmetic trick that may work in women is to apply a bit of hair colored eye shadow, on the scalp over the areas of thin hair. This is harmless and can make fine hair less noticeable.

Finally, do not use products that make tuffs or locks of hair stick together. This allows empty spaces on the scalp to be more easily seen.

Appropriate Shampoos

Maintaining clean hair helps preserve the health and beauty of hair. The frequency of washing and shampooing for each individual are important factors and should be recommended by a dermatologist. In the case of oily hair accommodated by thinning hair, frequent washing is advised because this reduces the fat on the surface of the scalp. It is important to have hair that is clean and non oily, as sebum contains elevated levels of dihydrotestosterone and testosterone (male hormones) that can be absorbed into the skin and affect hair follicles. In cases of dandruff and greasy hair that is washed frequently if it is best to switch to a treatment shampoo for frequent use. With these shampoos, you should wash your hair twice, and the second time leave it in for 2 -3 minutes without rubbing. The comb teeth should be wide and separated. Avoid metal brushes. If the hair has split ends (tricoptilosis) these can be repaired with a silicone polymer based repair serums, which acts as a patch on the split ends.

Conclusions

Hereditary hair loss is not curable, but it is controllable, and the sooner be treated the better. Currently there is not a perfect treatment for androgenetic alopecia, but there are drugs that stop hair loss and prolong the life of hair follicles.

We must consider the present and future hair treatments because hair needs living hair follicles. With baldness follicles are minimaturized and die after 5-10 years. With any treatment you will get better results with more follicles that remain alive. Many other hair problems are temporary and can be treated by dietary measures and other measures. In these cases, good dietary habits as well as eating supplements of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants help to stop hair loss and regain normal growth after a few months. For more information about hair loss, consult your dermatologist, because skin diseases include diseases of the hair and nails. Do not be influenced by advertisements for "hair tonic" or by hairdressing specialists.

Ear Infections and Homeopathy

As I am sitting at my desk, writing this very article, the phone rings. I had just finished referencing some recent medical journal articles (see below) which conclude the worthlessness of, and harm from, treating most childhood ear infections with antibiotics. There is a man on the line inquiring if I can help with his child’s ear infections. It seems his 14 month old daughter gets an ear infection about once per month. She has received multiple courses of antibiotics, all to no avail, and now their pediatrician wants to put her on a six month course! “This can’t be good for her,” he says to me. “So I am trying to find out if there is something else we can do.” These calls come all to often, usually after yet another failed antibiotic prescription or just after being told by the pediatrician that “If this doesn’t clear up soon we’ll need to do surgery to put tubes in Johnny’s ear.” Sound familiar? If not, yours is a very unusual child indeed. Earache is the single most common reason for bringing a child to a pediatrician. Three quarters of all children will have had at least one earache by the time they’re three years of age, and about a third will have had more than three episodes. Over the past 20 years the incidence of childhood ear infection has increased, occurring both more frequently and beginning at an earlier age.

Ear infections, or otitis (oto=ear, -itis=inflammation) can involve any part of the ear. Most commonly are infections of the outer ear or the ear canal called otitis externa, and the middle ear and ear drum, called otitis media. Of the two, otitis media is the more serious and the one most often referred to when your doctor diagnoses an “ear infection.” How the middle ear becomes infected is fairly straightforward. Why is not always so. There is a small tube, called the eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear and the throat. It’s purpose is twofold. One is to open and close to allow fluid produced in the ear to drain out and into the throat and prevent other fluids from backing up into the ear. It’s second function is also to open and close for the purpose of normalizing air pressure. When we travel to a higher altitude and our ears “clog.” Swallowing causes them to “pop” because that action opens the eustachian tube allowing the pressure inside and out to equalize. Ear infections may develop when the eustachian tube does not open and close properly, allowing germ-laden fluids from the throat, along with secretions produced in the nose, to back up into the middle ear and not drain out. Colds and allergies may produce inflammation in the area and can be another cause for the eustachian tube to not function properly. As the immune system does it’s job to fight the infection, dead bacteria and white blood cells form pus which puts pressure on the eardrum as it builds up. The eardrum, or tympanic membrane, bulges outward under this build up, becoming painful as it is stretched. An older child will be able to tell you that there is something going on with their ear. With younger children you may notice them tugging at the ear or behaving differently, becoming either particularly irritable or perhaps very clingy. Fever may or may not accompany an ear infection and can be low or quite high. Occasionally the thin tympanic membrane tears, producing an alternative route for the pus to drain out. If this happens you may notice a discharge coming out of the ear. Don’t become alarmed if this happens. The body has rid itself of unwanted infected material and a torn eardrum will usually heal by itself rather quickly.

But why do some children seem to have one ear infection after another and others not. As mentioned above, the inflammation produced by a cold may ultimately lead to an ear infection. The more colds a child gets the higher the risk of frequent ear infections. Allergic reactions, especially to certain foods, are also associated with an increased incidence of ear infections. The top offender seems to be milk, and dairy products in general. In addition to being a very common allergen, dairy also increases mucous production, making bodily secretions thicker and harder to drain away. Other commonly associated allergens are wheat, as well as other gluten-containing grains such as rye, oats and barley. Eggs, corn, oranges and nuts may also be suspect. Diets high in sugar and fruit juices should also be looked at.

Two interesting studies have implicated both pacifiers and second hand smoke. A Finnish study published in the September, 2000 issue of the journal Pediatrics implicated pacifier use with an increased risk of ear infection in infants, as well as higher rates of tooth decay and thrush. The study found that children who used pacifiers continuously had 33% more ear infections than did those who never used them or used them only when falling asleep. A report on a Canadian study in the February, 1998 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine showed that children residing with two smoking parents were 85% more likely to suffer from frequent ear infections than those who lived in smoke-free homes.

Another possible influence are childhood vaccinations. Although there is much controversy as to whether or not there is a direct relationship, a significant body of evidence suggests that there may be. From a homeopathic point of view, though, there are certain categories (called constitutional types) of people who, due to inherited influences, are more susceptible to vaccine reactions.

Serious complications of middle ear infections are rare but can and do occur. These include mastoiditis, an infection of the part of the skull bone just behind the ear, and meningitis, an infection of the covering of the brain and spinal cord. Symptoms of mastoiditis may include swelling, redness, pain and tenderness in the bony area behind the ear. Symptoms of meningitis are severe headache and stiff neck. Vomiting, mental dullness and mood changes may also be involved. If evidence of either of these two complications are seen, a doctor should be consulted immediately. By far the most common complication of middle ear infections are the chronic ear problems that often follow. Serous otitis media, commonly known as “glue ear,” is an accumulation of non-infectious fluid in the middle ear. It can cause problems with hearing as the fluid interferes with normal motion of the eardrum.

So now that we know what it is and how it got there, what should be done about it? As is evident from the opening paragraph of this article, conventional western medicine treats this problem with antibiotics. And shouldn’t they? This is an infection, right? And infections have to be treated with antibiotics, don’t they? If not, who knows what could happen! This couldn’t be further from the truth. The purpose of this article is not to debate the pros and cons of antibiotics. No one argues that, used appropriately, they can save lives. But they have not been used properly. They have been over-prescribed and wrongly prescribed. So much so that an article in the New York Times on June 13, 2000, reported that “The World Health Organization, taking its first comprehensive look at drug-resistant diseases, concluded in a report released today that the effectiveness of antibiotics had been so eroded globally that some diseases that were once easily treatable are now often incurable. Misuse of antibiotics, including over prescribing, and their use to increase animal growth have made treating illnesses as diverse as ear infections, tuberculosis and malaria much more difficult, said the report from the health agency, part of the United Nations.”

A paper published in the July 23, 1997 issue of the British Medical Journal reproached doctors for prescribing antibiotics routinely for ear infections in their pediatric patients. It reported on an analysis of existing studies relating to such treatment and concluded that not only is the practice a waste of time and money, it appears to be harmful. Antibiotics don’t speed recovery (in fact, at least one previous study suggests that they lead to more recurrences) and promotes proliferation of stronger, drug-resistant bacteria. The British researchers estimate that 97 percent of physicians routinely prescribe antibiotics for ear infections. An editorial in the November 26, 1997 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the largest medical journal in the world, citing this same study, encouraged physicians to stop all antibiotic use (except in very severe and recurrent cases) for this most commonly treated infection in childhood.

The RAND corporation’s Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC), conducting research for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, discovered some interesting facts regarding the management of acute ear infections. They found that nearly two-thirds of children with uncomplicated ear infections are free of pain and fever within 24 hours of diagnosis without antibiotic treatment, and that over 80% recover completely within 1 to 7 days. 93% of children treated with antibiotics recover within that same 1 to 7 days. The researchers also found that the newer and more costly antibiotics, such as cefaclor, cefixime, azithromycin, or clarithromycin, provided no additional benefit to children than amoxicillin. Amoxicillin caused fewer side effects than the other antibiotics as well. The EPC also found no evidence that short-duration (5 days or less) versus long-duration therapy (7-10 days) made a difference in the clinical outcome for children over 2 years of age. More than 5 million cases of acute ear infections occur annually, costing about $3 billion. The report points out that in other countries otitis media is not treated with drugs at the first sign of infection. Rather, in children over the age of 2 years, the norm is to watch and see how the infection progresses over the course of a few days. The report notes that in the Netherlands the rate of bacterial resistance is only about 1%, compared with the US average of around 25%.

The conventional western medical treatment for children who develop chronic otitis media is a surgical procedure called a tympanostomy. This involves the insertion of small tubes into the ear drum to drain away the fluid build up. The rationale behind this approach is that the reduced hearing caused by the condition may lead to long-term speech and hearing problems, and even behavioral and intellectual impairments. What I often hear from parents is that they have been told their child will go deaf if the procedure is not performed. Again, the current research does not bear this out. A study published this year (April 19, 2001) in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that children with persistent otitis media who get the tubes inserted immediately do not show measurable improvements in developmental outcomes. And this procedure is, by no stretch of the imagination, without it’s risks. The editorial which accompanied the NEJM article stated that “The tubes often lead to long-term anatomical changes in the tympanic membrane, especially tympanosclerosis [hardening of the ear drum,] retraction, and changes in mobility. What happens, for example, to hearing and the mobility of the tympanic membrane in middle-aged persons who had tubes inserted in childhood?” Not to mention that in any procedure requiring anesthesia, there is always the possibility of death!

Now that we have an understanding of what causes this all too common problem and know how not to treat it, let’s talk about what to do. As with any illness, first and foremost is prevention. And the best preventative for any infection is a strong immune system. For infants and small children, the best way to build their immune system is breast feeding. Breast milk is by far the most nutritious food for your child. For a more detailed discussion of this, and for alternatives for women who cannot or will not nurse, I refer the reader to Sally Fallon’s wonderful book, Nourishing Traditions, 1999, New Trends Publishing, Washington, D.C. Of course, prevention also means avoiding the various risk factors already discussed, such as providing your child with a smoke-free living environment, limiting the use of pacifiers, identifying and eliminating food allergies, limiting or removing sugar and fruit juices from the diet. If your child has already taken antibiotics, the use of probiotics, or “friendly bacteria,” is essential. Antibiotics destroy not only the “bad germs,” but also the good ones which reside in our gut. These bacteria are an important part of our body’s natural defense. A study published in the January, 2001 issue of the British Medical Journal showed that the addition of probiotics reduced both the number of recurrences of, and complications from, otitis media.

Now, to the active treatment of acute otitis media. A well known alternative medicine practitioner and columnist, Dr. Joseph Mercola, advocates putting a few drops of breast milk (your own or, if you’re not lactating, someone else’s) into the ear every few hours. He claims that this will clear up most ear infections within 24-48 hours. While the thought of clearing up a case of otitis media in one to two days using only breast milk may sound great, for me this is still way too long for a child to suffer. The well selected homeopathic remedy will act gently and very quickly, often within minutes (see cases below.) But there are so many homeopathic remedies that are useful in treating ear infections. In fact, a search in my repertory (the book homeopaths use which list all symptoms and which remedies are associated with them) under ear pain shows 326 remedies, 114 specifically under middle ear pain and another 65 under inflammation of the middle ear. Obviously then, different remedies are needed to treat the same symptoms in different people. For the average person, choosing the right remedy from this list can seem a daunting task. An important point to understand is that homeopathic remedies should be taken one at a time. Taking several remedies at once (as is found in combination remedies sold in stores for this ailment or that) can be confusing to the body and is not recommended. If you don’t know what remedy to take it is better to consult with an experienced homeopath, who will know how to elicit the necessary information in order to make an appropriate remedy choice. If your child has already been prescribed a constitutional remedy (a remedy which covers your general constitution and not just the symptoms of a particular illness) that will be you first and best remedy choice in any acute situation, earache or otherwise. For chronic problems, including chronic otitis, a constitutional remedy becomes a necessity. However, it has been my experience that for most cases of acute, uncomplicated middle ear infections, just remember “ABC.” “ABC” stands for the homeopathic remedies aconitum, belladonna and chamomilla. Following is a brief description of each.

Fear and anxiety are the main feature of aconitum. The aconitum earache is notable for it’s sudden onset, often being brought on by exposure to the elements, especially a cold, dry wind. The pain is intense and there may be a high fever. The child will be restless and thirsty, and the ear may appear bright red.

The belladonna earache has severe pain. The ear will be red, hot and throbbing, as will be the eardrum, as seen with an otoscope. More often than not, the belladonna earache will be right-sided and worse at night. These may be brought on by changes in temperature, with the child getting chilled or becoming overheated.

With the chamomilla type earache, the pain seems unbearable in a child who is already the oversensitive type, especially to pain. The child who will respond well to chamomilla will be quite irritable and seemingly inconsolable, except when held or carried.

D.W., a 2 year old girl, could be heard screaming in the background of the message her mother left on my answering machine. “She’s got a terrible ear ache. She keeps tugging at her ear. I don’t know what to give her.” (The mother, a patient of mine, had a well supplied homeopathic medicine kit.) “Oh, we’re supposed to leave for vacation in 15 minutes.” When I returned the call a few minutes later I got their machine. Hoping they hadn’t left yet I asked several questions. A few minutes later there was another message back with the answers. “Right ear, red and hot to the touch.” I called back, only to get the answering machine again. A very frustrating game of phone tag. “Belladonna,” I said. About an hour later I received a call, this time from the car phone. There was silence in the background. “I gave her the belladonna just before we got into the car. Within five minutes she stopped crying and the redness and heat left her ear. She’s been sleeping ever since.”

A.B., a 3 year old boy was brought in by his parents. He had a persistent ear infection in both ears. He had already been on three different antibiotics. A ear specialist put him on steroids, but still the tympanogram ( a devise that measures the mobility of the ear drum) showed little improvement. The specialist suggested “the tubes.” On examination his left ear drum was looking not too bad, the right was red and bulging from behind with fluid. A homeopathic consultation with a child this young not only requires finding out as much as possible about the child, but also about the parents. I prescribed chamomilla ( which seemed to be his constitutional type) in a liquid potency to be given on a daily basis, along with some probiotic products. I also performed a special cranial procedure to open the eustachian tubes and help the built up fluid to drain out of the middle ear. He was symptom free by the next morning. When I saw him five days later both ears were perfectly clear, with no redness or sign of fluid at all. A follow-up tympanogram by the specialist a few days later was normal.

Homeopathy and Childhood Ear Infections

Think “ABC”

by Stuart H. Garber, D.C., Ph.D.

Help! I Think I Have a Hearing Loss!

Hearing Loss

Friends and family members have been hinting that you need to have your hearing checked. You took a free online hearing test, but now you're worried because these unofficial test results indicate you have a hearing loss. What should you do?

First, do not panic. Make an appointment with an Ear, Throat, and Nose (ENT) doctor and have your ears examined. An ENT can do an examination and let you know immediately if there is an obvious reason for a decline in your hearing, such as fluid in the ears, an ear infection, or wax build-up. If there is no apparent reason for your hearing loss, the ENT will probably do additional testing and may refer you to an audiologist for a comprehensive hearing evaluation.

Hearing Exam

The audiologist will examine your ear drums and measure the pressure in your middle ear before beginning the test. While wearing headphones, you will listen to a series of tones in different frequencies and decibels, and indicate the ones you can hear. Your responses will be graded on an audiogram.

Words classified as spondees (two-syllable words that have equal stress on each syllable) will be played into your answers for you to repeat. This part of the test determines how well you understand speech. Background noise will be played during a part of the speech comprehension test to measure how well you hear in a noisy environment.

After the testing is complete, your audiologist will be able to tell you if you are listening below normal or not. If you are diagnosed with a hearing loss, your audiologist will tell the type of loss you have and recommend treatment options. There are three types of hearing loss: conductive, sensorineural, and mixed. A conductive loss is caused by problems with the ear canal, ear drum, or middle ear and its tiny bones (the malleus, incus, and stapes). This type of hearing loss is usually treated medically or surgically. A sensorineural loss is also known as nerve-deafness, and is caused by problems in the inner ear. Hearing aids are usually prescribed. A mixed hearing loss is a combination of conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.

If the audiologist determines you have a sensorineural loss, you can probably be helped with hearing aids. Conductive losses can not be helped with hearing aids due to damage in the inner ear and outer / middle ear. People with a mixed loss may or may not benefit from hearing aids; the conductive loss should be treated first, then hearing aids may be helpful.

If you've received an official diagnosis of hearing loss, there's no reason to feel embarrassed. If hearing aids will help you, there's nothing shameful about wearing them. People who wear glasses or contacts are not accused of having less than perfect vision, they're simply using assistive technology to see normally. Likewise, hearing aids are assistive technology, but with a huge difference – hearing aids will not give you normal hearing, they will only help you hear better.

Reading deaf blogs will show you that your beexperiences are common to others with a hearing loss. But do not just read information online – meet deaf and hard of hearing people off-line in safe settings. Here are some suggestions:

  • Attend Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) meetings
  • Attend the Association of Late-Deafened Adults (ALDA) meetings
  • Check your local college for sign language classes
  • Go to Silent Dinners and Deaf Starbucks social outings
  • Check meetup.com for gatherings of people learning sign language

Make sure that you begin interacting with people who also have hearing loss. Do not isolate yourself. Your friendships with deaf and hard of hearing people will become very valuable as you accept your silence. In time, you will discover that life can be just as enjoyable as before.

Kill Your Stutter – Stop Stammering Today

Although it isn’t usually an issue that affects every body – stuttering is a horrible problem for school children, teenagers and grown ups today. A stammer can cause even the most confident person to avoid conversations with colleagues and family as well as interactions with other people they know due to a fear of being mocked. Whether you like it or not, a stammer can truly wreck any person’s whole life.

Although being cursed with a stammer absolutely is a massive problem and a lot of the time a greatly complicated ailment, the good news is, it is easily possible to stop stuttering. Truth is, it is completely possible to entirely quit stammering and say goodbye to stammering for good.

It’s likely that you could be thinking that this really seems too good to even remotely be true. Actually, believe it or not the the whole truth (and nothing but the truth) is, stuttering is a deep-rooted psychological affliction and a psychological problem that can very easily be removed as long as the base of the problem is discovered.

Even though it more than likely does seem like this, you’re not by yourself with the stutter. According to the stats somewhere near 1 percent of the population (of the Western World) has a stutter but the sad truth is but a tiny of this number will genuinely attempt to kill their stammering affliction.

While that tiny minority of stutter sufferers who who really make the decision to end their stutter will go on to live better off, fulfilled lives, the majority of those who don’t kill their stutter will pass further into the shadows, keeping off as much social interaction as possible.

Is the solution stuttering therapy and speech correction classes?

In reality, therapy is the remedy – however this does not mean paid for professional counselling. Stuttering can be fixed in under an hour however as professional counsellors are paid by the hour, this is not by any means cost effective for them. Of course, this is not to state that professional counsellors are actually avoiding trying to cure stutter sufferers in an actual attempt to to put fancier bread on the table but, it must be said, there is an actual element of truth to this idea. More importantly why throw away several thousand for private paid-for therapy when you genuinely can remove your stutter yourself.

Sleep Apnea Surgery

Sleep apnea (apnea from the Greek, meaning "without breath") is a sleep disorder characterized by frequent pauses in breathing during sleep. There are three types of sleep apnea, obstructive, central and mixed. Obstructive is the most common, it is caused by anatomical blockage of the airway, and as such can often be treated by sleep apnea surgery.

Sleep apnea surgery for obstructive sleep apnea consist of several different types of procedures:

1. Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or UPPP, is the most common sleep apnea surgery for adults. The procedure enlarges the airway by removing or shortening the uvula, (tissue that hangs from the roof of the mouth at the back of the throat). The tonsils and adenoids, if present, are also removed as well as part of the soft palate (roof of the mouth).

2. Tonsillectomy and / or adenoidectomy is a sleep apnea surgery that removes the tonsils and / or the adenoids, often the first treatment option for children because enlarged tonsils and adenoids are usually the cause of their sleep apnea.

3. Tracheotomy creates a hole in the windpipe (trachea), and a tube is placed in the hole to allow air in. This sleep apnea surgery, the most effective, is usually reserved for serious apnea sufferers when other treatments have failed. The site around the tube must be cleaned daily to prevent infection.

4. Septoplasy is a sleep apnea surgery that straightens a crooked septum (the partition between the nasal cavities).

5. Laser midline glossectomy and lingualplasty are types of sleep apnea surgery that remove a portion of the tongue.

6. Maxillomandibular osteotomy or enhancement (MMO or MMA) and two-part inferior sagittal mandibular osteotomy. are types of sleep apnea surgery which help enlarge the airway by moving the mandible (jaw) forward These surgeries have high success rates, but last several hours, have a significant recovery period, and potential complications.

7. A relatively new procedure for sleep apnea surgery, performed in the physician's office, is radio frequency ablation (RFTA), trade name SomnoplastyTM. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1998, it shrinks the size of the tongue and / or palate. Multiple treatments may be required, and can be used together with other sleep apnea treatments.

8. The tongue suspension procedure (trade name Repose) is a different sleep apnea surgery procedure. Approved by the FDA in February 1998, this sleep apnea surgery is intended to keep the tongue from falling back over the airway by inserting a small screw into the lower jawbone and stitches below the tongue. Usually performed in conjunction with other procedures, this surgery is potentially reversible. No studies, however, on the long-term success are available, and little clinical data have been published to demonstrate the procedure's effectiveness.

When considering sleep apnea surgery, be aware that effectiveness varies from person to person. Physicians who perform sleep apnea surgery are most commonly otolaryngologists (specializing in the ears, nose, and throat) and oral and maxillofacial surgeons. References to a surgeon may be obtained through your family physician or through a sleep center.

Knee Replacement and Reversing Muscle Atrophy After Surgery

Once your knee replacement surgery or knee surgery in general is completed and you have gone through your physical rehabilitation program, you are encouraged to continue some sort of exercise program. For many this will consist of everything from strength training at a local gym to walking around the block. To get the most productivity out of your surgery, it is recommended you incorporate weight training as well as other exercises if you wish to keep the muscles around your knee strong to help you improve your quality of life and, to protect the prosthesis that has been implanted.

I recommend my patients and clients to work on an assortment of exercises depending on their age, prior level of function and, expectations. Today, with many younger adults having knees replaced, many of them are expecting to get back into enjoying their prior activities within reason as soon as possible.

The exercises to reverse the muscle wasting process I include in the exercise routine are leg presses, leg extensions, hamstring curls and calf raises. These are exercise I use and continue to use to keep my knee replacement running and operating at a high level. Use a weight that you can initially get between 15-20 repetitions to start with. You first want to build endurance in the muscle. Working with weight that is too heavy will cause a considerable amount of muscle soreness and discomfort and swelling if you are not careful. You start slowly and increase your resistance as you get stronger and more confident with the exercises.

What I instruct patients that are pursuing post rehabilitation strengthening is to start by warming up on a stationary bike for 10 to 15 minutes at a slow pace to loosen the muscle and surrounding soft tissue around the knee. Follow the stationary bike with two sets of leg presses for 20 repetitions using slow controlled movements. Do not take your knees past the 90 degree mark at this time. Follow leg presses with seated leg extensions for 15 -20 repetitions. Then you go to hamstring curls which can be done either seated or in the prone position for the same amount of repetitions. These exercises should be done for two sets each to start with.

As you get stronger in the months ahead you can of course increase your workload as tolerated. Avoid using very heavy weights that might stress the prosthesis. Heavy weights will not be needed to rebuild your leg or legs to get them to an ideal level. Remember after joint replacement surgery, your rehabilitation should really never end.

Also to be sure that you are taking in a good quality protein to help in reversing muscle atrophy and after knee surgery. Taking in quality protein such as skinless chicken breasts, salmon, ground turkey breast and egg whites are just some of the ways to help you increase your protein intake during the recovery phase.

Taking a good quality protein powder supplement also is the key in making sure you are getting the fuel your body needs to help in building stronger muscles not only in your legs but also by reversing the atrophy process throughout your entire body.

Glaucoma and Eye Symptoms Caused by Prescriptions For Depression – When to Call Your Optometrist

Serotonin re uptake inhibitors are as common as aspirin today (and probably much safer). There category as selective serotonin re uptake inhibitors is a long winded way of saying it makes the molecule serotonin stay around longer and act on you brain instead of being recycled. This allows a prolonged action of serotonin, one of the feel good molecules used to treat depression and a variety of other conditions. The eye has numerous receptor sites where serotonin acts, though they are not well understood at this time. A number of other prescription drugs also fall in this category.

One thing they share in common is a tendency to mildly dilate the pupils. This is rarely a problem, but if you have been told you have "Narrow Angles" or are susceptible to angle closure glaucoma it can be a concern. Farsighted patients have smaller drainage angles for the fluid inside the eye to escape back into the general circulation. With age, the lens inside the eye grows and moves forward, further restricting the drainage channels. When you enter into a dark room or movie theater the pupil naturally dilates also. When diluted, the colored tissue known as the iris bunches up it's outside edges. This thickens right at the location where the fluid is supposed to drain out. In a normal eye there is plenty of extra space to compensate for this but eyes with narrow angles start to be blocked by the bunched up iris tissue. Occasionally, the drain can be completely blocked and since fluid is being produced in the eye the pressure skyrockets up.

Usually these results in an acute attack of a very painful, blurry red eye with nausea and headaches. Drugs like Prozac in a rare handy cases have been known to push this process over the edge and precipitate angle closure glaucoma attacks. While very illegally, if you have narrow angles you should be aware of this, since this form of glaucoma is curable with early treatment.

The other possibility from this category of drugs is a transient rise in eye pressure for several weeks (although some cases report drops in pressure). If you have just started Prozac or a similar drug and your eye pressure readings are a little high, discuss this with your optometrist and have the pressures retested in 2-3 weeks. There is usually a return to normal if it is a mild medication induced increase. A retest in a few weeks could save you money on unnecessary treatment and testing.

One of the anti convulse-ant drugs used to treat epilepsy, migraines and depression has also been documented to cause angle closure glaucoma in a small number of patients. This tend to occur in the first few months and there are not necessarily predisposing factors. If you start having eye symptoms shortly after starting one of these medications notify your doctors immediately. Finally, be happy that we have treatments that have such better safety profiles than the prior generation.

Natural Myopia Cure – How to Cure Myopia Without Surgery

Myopia is a nearsighted condition where the eyes have become accustomed to near object and thus sees objects that are far away in a blurred manner. There are many ways people can try to find a myopia cure. One of the most common ways people choose to cure it is through glasses or surgery. Even though these are common, they may not necessarily be for everyone.

Glasses can be bothersome and sometimes expensive. They also are not a cure, but just a means of being able to see well. When you don’t wear them you have bad vision. It may also be the case that glasses can even worsen your vision over time. For surgery, the common issue is that it can be risky and expensive. There are also natural ways to improve your eyesight.

One way many people have attempted to find a myopia cure is through exercises. Some exercises involve you rolling your eyes side to side and up and down. This is an attempt to stimulate blood flow to the eyes. This has to be repeated for a long period for it to have even the slightest effect. Some people have received positive results so it is worth a try.

Another common solution is to take a bilberry extract supplement. It has been shown to prevent macular degeneration and is also believed to help with night vision problems. It also improves the overall health of your eye sight because of its vitamin levels. Bilberry is a fruit that is similar to a blueberry.

Another manner by which you can cure myopia is by relaxing your eyes after reading or staring at the t v or computer. After 30 minutes of nearsighted work, stare at a wall in the distance for at least 5 minutes. This will relax your eyes. Myopia cure through relaxation is very easy and free.

Mario Santos has been working as an eye wellness expert for years and has helped hundreds of people who have eyesight problems.