Oregano Spice – Friend On The Mint Family!

As many herb experts know that oregano is truly a member of the mint family one can not help to wonder why it tastes nothing like “mint”. Oregano is traditionally used in hundreds of recipes especially Italian cuisine as well as a great spice for soups and sauces. You can buy the freshest dried oregano right at our “Florida Herb House” in Port Orange, FL or online at www.FloridaHerbHouse.com or www.SharpWebLabs.com! We would love to see you!
Oregano which comes from about 35 plants is widely cultivated in Europe as a culinary herb. Oregano is an upright perennial herb, growing to about 30 inches but can reach heights of six feet. It has square, red stems, elliptical leaves, and clusters of deep pink flowers. It thrives in chalky soils near the sea, and is gathered when in flower during the summer.
Marjoram is a woody perennial herb native to countries bordering the Mediterranean, but now widely cultivated, especially in Germany. Depending on the area of cultivation, there may be two crops per year. It grows to about twenty inches, having aromatic, light green, oval leaves and pinkish white flowers emerging from the upper leaf axils. The leaves have a mild sage-like flavour.
The oregano plants are well known food seasonings, as well as having a long history as medicinal plants. In China, they have long been used to treat fever, diarrhea, and vomiting.
Oregano was much used by the ancient Greeks, and had a more significant role in medicine than did marjoram.
The 18th century herbalist, K’Eogh described it as having a “hot, dry nature” considered good for stomach pains and the heart as well as for coughs, pleurisy, and “obstructions of the lungs and womb”, and thought to be a “comfort” to the head and nerves.
In 1597, the herbalist John Gerard made an assessment of marjoram, saying that it was a remedy “against cold diseases of the brain and head” including that of toothaches. It was also thought to lower the sex drive.

Make your own famous pizza sauce with our organic oregano and be a star!

Ingredients:

1 can tomato puree (14 or 16 ounce)
1/2 teaspoon organic oregano
1/2 teaspoon organic basil
1/2 teaspoon organic parsley
2 cloves organic garlic
dash ground black peppercorns

dash red pepper – (Go easy)

Directions:

Mix ingredients in a bowl. Spread evenly and thinly over your favorite pizza crust – too much sauce can make your pizza nasty. (I like to bake my crust – if made from dough – for about 10 minutes before putting on sauce.) Add your favorite toppings and cheese and cook for an additional 10 minutes at 400° Fahrenheitt (204° Celsiuss). Pizza is done when cheese begins to brown. Extra sauce will stay fresh for about 10 days in fridge.

Sincerely,

Stephen C. Sharp

Florida Herb House

Salivary Stones – Nonoperative Removal of Sialoliths and Sialodochoplasy of Salivary Duct Strictures

Objective- To describe the nonsurgical removal of sialoliths and treatment of salivary duct strictures. Design- Case series. Setting- Two 200-bed general community hospitals. Patients- Twelve consecutive patients from April 1985 to November 1994 – 8 with calculi, 3 with salivary duct strictures, and 1 with calculi and strictures. Results- Successful nonoperative removal of calculi in 7 of 9 patients. All four sialodochoplasties were successful. All 10 patients with successful procedures had no recurrent symptoms. Seven patients have been symptom-free for 10 months to ten years. Communication with 3 patients has been impossible recently, although these patients were symptom-free for at least 3 years. To date we have successfully treated twenty-five of twenty-eight patients for salivary duct calculi removal and dilatation of strictures. Conclusions- These methods of nonsurgical sialolith removal and sialodochoplasty were highly successful and should be used as the initial therapies for patients with these conditions.

SIALOLITHIASIS and salivary duct strictures are common pathological conditions of the salivary glands and their ducts. They produce similar symptoms of swelling, pain, and infection as a result of duct obstruction. Swelling and pain usually occur during meals, when salivary secretion is stimulated.Until recently, surgery has been the standard therapy for these conditions. This approach is invasive with important unavoidable risks and complications. Potential risk of damage to the facial nerve is high during parotid gland surgery.Recently, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has been introduced as an alternative treatment of sialolithiasis. Miniature lithotriptors have been developed and show some promise. However, these units are not generally available and their success rates have been variable.The mechanical removal of sialoliths and sialodochoplasty for duct stricture have been our initial approach for these diseases. These minimally invasive procedures are highly effective and avoid the known complications of surgery and anesthesia. Combining these methods with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy promises to further increase success rates.

Results:

From April 1985 to November 1994, the mechanical removal of sialoliths was successful in 7 patients with sialolithiasis: 5 with submandibular duct calculi (See Figure 1 below) and 2 with parotid duct calculi (See Figure 2 below). Four patients underwent successful sialodochoplasties, 2 for parotid ducts and 2 for submandibular ducts. One patient had sialoliths and a stricture, so the total number of successful procedures was 11.

In 1 patient, the calculus was located close to the papilla, making retrieval especially difficult because of impaction. A grasping forceps was successfully used and a wide papillotomy was unnecessary.

In 2 patients, calculus retrieval failed: 1 each from the Stensen and Wharton ducts. These were technical failures caused by large impacted calculi and by strictures in the distal segment of the ducts, which made mechanical manipulation impossible. There were no sialodochoplasty failures.

The long-term outcomes following the procedures were excellent. No patient returned with recurrent symptoms. Seven patients remained symptom-free after clinical follow-up from 10 months to 10 years, and 3 patients were symptom-free for 3 to 5 years and then were unavailable for follow-up.

Materials and Methods:

Before the examination, the details of the procedure and its benefits and complications were explained to the patient. Informed consent was obtained for the sialography and for the mechanical removal of the calculi, sialodocholoplasty, or both.

As an initial diagnostic examination, sialography was performed to confirm the location of the strictures and calculi. The papillae were locally anesthetized by direct injection of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride. The papillotomy was accomplished by an incision toward the duct. No sedation or general anesthesia was given.

For the removal of the calculi, a 3.5F 4-wire Dormia basket (Porges, Paliseau Cedex, Salat, France), 3F Segura basket (Microvasive Co [Boston Scientific Corp.], Watertown Mass), and 3F Coaxial Sheath Grasping Forceps ( Cook Urological Co, Spencer, Ind) were used. For the sialodochoplasty, 3.8F 3-mm diameter Balloon catheters (Meditech, Watertown, Mass) were used.

After the papillotomy was accomplished, the papilla and adjacent salivary ducts were dilated by 3F and 4F dilators or stiff catheters of the same size. A 0.45-mm guide wire was introduced routinely to guide the balloon catheter. If there was a stricture, balloon dilatation was performed several times until full dilatation was achieved.

For the calculi, a basket was placed beyond or at the calculi site and the basket was manipulated to achieve extraction. When several calculi are present, several attempts may be required.

Comment:

The symptoms of sialoliths and salivary duct stricture are similar: intermittent swelling, tenderness, and pain usually brought on by eating. Infection and sialadenitis are common complications. For a definitive diagnosis, sialography is imperative, especially to diagnose the presence of several calculi or to detect all strictures.

A few cases of balloon-catheter sialodochoplasty and wire-basket removal of caculi have been reported, mainly in foreign journals (ref. 1-3). Also, calculus was removed by an angioplasty balloon catheter (ref. 4).

The most likely surgical management of intraglandular parotid calculi would involve parotidectomy. There does not seem to be a consensus on managing calculi located between the gland hilus and anterior to the masseter muscle. Extraoral parotid sialolithotomy for calculus extraction has been performed under sialographic and ultrasonographic guidance (ref. 5).

The surgical approach to submandibular calculi is influenced by the location of the stone. Palpable stones anterior to the posterior border of the mylohyoid muscle usually are extracted using a transoral incision. When the stone is posterior to the mylohyoid muscle, removal of the entire gland is recommended (ref. 6,7). The complication rate for these procedures and associated anesthesia is not negligible (ref. 8).

In our independent small series during the last 10 years, we have achieved a high success rate. Contrary to other authors' (ref. 5) experience, we did not have difficulty removing parotid calculi located more than 1.5 cm from the papilla, although removal of calculi from the Wharton duct is generally easier than from the Stensen duct. The course and small size of the Stensen duct often makes instrument manipulation difficult. In our 2 cases of failure, the calculi were larger than the ducts and impacted. These ducts had long strictures in their distal segments, which made instrument approach to the calculi and manipulation impossible. A successful removal of this type of calculus was reported with a vascular snare (ref. 9).

Endoscopic laser lithotripsy is unavailable at our institution. Endoscopically controlled laser lithotripsy for removal of a stone in the Stensen duct (ref. 10) and submandibular lithiasis (ref. 11) has been reported. Our 2 cases of failure could have benefited from this method. A success rate of 36% to 53% has been reported for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ref. 12).

Wehrmann et a1 (ref. 13) developed a miniaturized lithotriptor, and a significantly higher percentage of patients were free of calculi (stone-free rate, 67%) after treatment. The authors did not report whether any case in this series required supplemental mechanical retrieval of calculi.

In conclusion, mechanical removal of calculi and sialodochoplasty by balloon catheter are excellent alternatives to surgery. These procedures are more cost-effective, with reduced risk of morbidity when compared with the surgical alternatives. The long-term outcome following the procedure is excellent. If the mechanical retrieval of calculi fails, laser lithotripsy, extracorporal lithotripsy, or both will improve the success rate.

Ginseng – Is It Really Beneficial or an Asian Myth?

For thousands of years, ginseng has been revered in the Orient as an almost magical natural supplement with amazing benefits for those who use it regularly. It is said that ginseng will boost the immune system, enhance vitality, increase physical endurance, increase mental alertness, and treat illnesses like colds, fevers, headaches, and vomiting. It is even believed to be an aphrodisiac.

Let’s face it, if ginseng actually had the properties to give all the benefits it is believed to give, people would be taking it with every meal. The fact is however, the benefits of ginseng fall a far sight short of its claims.

Commercially, ginseng is taken as tea, in capsules, in liquid form from viles, or even by eating the root itself. Usually it is taken in doses of around 5 grams at a time. Ginseng is most commonly grown in Asia, particularly in China, Korea, and Japan, although it can also be found in wooded areas from Quebec to Missouri.

Ginsenosides, which is the active substance in the root, has been shown to increase endurance and decrease fatigue in mice when given to them in large amounts. One study where large amounts were given to humans noted a small improvement in the endurance levels of those who took it. Also, “Chinese herbal medicine”, published by the US National Institute of Health, claims the use of ginseng can raise unusually low blood pressure and can help prevent shock after heart attacks.

However, there is no good scientific evidence to support any of the claims made of these alleged benefits of consuming this root. It is also very likely that when you buy ginseng at the store, it will have a low concentration of ginsenosides in it. This means that even if ginseng does have some marginal benefit to offer, you will probably not receive any of them.

The lancet, a British medical journal, published a study done in Sweden which showed that most commercially sold ginseng products contained only trace amounts of ginsenosides. These findings concluded that the amount of ginsenosides found in these products was too insignificant to be of any benefit. Some of the products, including two sold in the US (“Siberian Ginseng” and “Up Your Gas”), had almost none of this substance at all.

For the most part, taking small to moderate amounts of ginseng will not be harmful to you, but you have to ask yourself if dollar for dollar it is worth taking something which is of no real value or benefit to you. We all can fall victim to hype made about a product, especially one that has been around for thousands of years, but when there is no good, proven science to support that products claims, save your money for a more useful purpose.

Bronchitis with a Rattling Cough

Bronchitis is the inflammation of the bronchi, which are situated in your lungs and sometimes in the trachea, the windpipe conveying air from your nose to your lungs. Any inflammation in your lungs is going to cause difficulty in breathing regardless of the cause, which can be many and varied.

You may feel congested and may have a lot of catarrh.

Bronchitis can vary in form from a mild acute problem, to a full blown chronic and serious problem.

While it is not wise for anyone untrained to treat any serious respiratory problem, you can treat yourself for the mild forms, for the recurring types and in addition to normal treatment.

This article is all about a rattling cough which seems to come from your throat or deep in your chest. A rattling cough means you have a lot of catarrh. You feel congested.

Often you can’t cough up the mucus although you want to and try really hard to. It just won’t come up.

For any cough which fits this picture, the homeopathic medicine Antimonium tartaricum (Ant tart for short) can be a god send.

Frequently this type of moist cough comes at the extremes of life. New-borns may have it. The elderly may experience it, so it is often referred to as the death rattle.

Winter is a bad time, with this cough and congestion recurring several times. Your immune system is not able to shrug this off.

Those who will benefit from Ant tart can be, but not necessarily, in a weak state. They may fall asleep during a coughing fit.

One of my colleagues gave it to her father, as he appeared to be coming to the end of his life. He was. And he was ready to go, so he didn’t appreciate her successful efforts at bringing him back.

So if you have a moist and rattling cough, which doesn’t bring up the mucus however hard you try, you seem to get it more in winter, and you feel better in a sitting position, then Ant tart is probably going to do you a lot of good.

The disease label, of say bronchitis, is not indicative of this effective use of this medicine. What is important is your unique symptoms. So if you have bronchitis, but the above symptom picture doesn’t fit you, Ant tart won’t do you any good at all.

Food Poisoning – How To Avoid It, How To Treat It

While America's food supply is the safest in the world, food poisoning is responsible for approximately 76 million illnesses in the United States each year. In fact, it is estimated that 60% or more of the raw poultry sold today probably has disease-causing bacteria. Anyone eating food contaminated by certain bacteria, parasites, or viruses can get food poisoning. Certain factors such as age and physical condition can make certain people more susceptible to food poisoning than others. Infants, pregnant women, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems are at greatest risk.

For most people in good condition, food poisoning is usually neither long lasting nor life-threatening. However, to less healthy individuals it can become a serious health threat, accounting for approximately 5,000 deaths each year.

The good news is that by taking simple precautionary steps while purchasing, handling, and preparing food you can prevent most cases of food poisoning in the home.

What causes food poisoning? Food poisoning is most commonly caused by bacteria, parasites, or viruses that may be present in the food that you have eaten. You may have heard the names of many of these organisms. They include Escherichia coli (E coli), Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium botulinum, Shigella, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Trichinella, and Hepatitis A virus, just to name a few. They can be present in a wide range of food including red meat, poultry, milk and other dairy products, eggs, unpasteurized vegetable juices and ciders, spices, chocolate, seafood, and even water.

These organisms may be present on your food when it is bought or can get into the food, including cooked food, if the food comes into contact with raw meat juices on dirty utensils, cutting boards, or countertops used to prepare contaminated food. That's why it is important not only to thoroughly cook your food, but to wash your hands, utensils, and countertops, before and after you handle raw foods.

What are the symptoms? Symptoms will vary depending on the type and amount of contaminants eaten. Some people may get ill after ingesting only a small amount of harmful bacteria, while others may remain free of symptoms after eating larger quantities. The most common symptoms of food poisoning include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain (cramps), fever, headache, and fatigue. Symptoms may develop as soon as 30 minutes after eating tainted food, but more commonly do not develop for several days or weeks. Symptoms of viral or parasitic food poisoning may not appear for several weeks, while some toxins in fish may take only a few minutes to cause symptoms.

If you have botulism, you probably will not have a fever and the symptoms may include blurred vision, fatigue, dry mouth and throat.

How food poisoning is diagnosed Food poisoning is often suspected when several people become ill after eating the same meal. To diagnose the cause of the illness, your doctor will need to know the symptoms and what was eaten right before the illness occurred. The doctor may need samples of the food, bowel movements, or vomit. These samples can be tested in a laboratory to determine if the food was contaminated and identify the organism causing the illness.

How is it treated? If the symptoms are severe, the victim should see a doctor or get emergency care. Treatment depends on the severity and cause of the food poisoning. Generally, for mild cases of food poisoning, the doctor will recommend for you to rest, drink fluids to prevent dehydration due to vomiting or diarrhea, and to follow a specific diet. It usually only takes about 1 to 5 days to recover from food poisoning.

If you have botulism, your doctor will prescribe an antitoxin. Other types of food poisoning have no antidote. Antibiotics are usually not helpful in treating food poisoning. Medicine to stop vomiting and stomach cramping may be given.

Prevention is the best approach to avoid food poisoning Most cases of food poisoning can be prevented. Below is a list of a few simple Do's and Don'ts to help you avoid food-borne illness in the home.

● Do wash your hands, utensils, cutting boards, and countertops between different foods

● Do hrefrigerate or freeze perishables right away (Refrigerator temperature should be 41˚ F and freezer 0˚F)

● Do thoroughly cook foods. Cook beef, lamb, and pork to an internal temperature of 160˚F; whole poultry and thighs to 180˚F; poultry breasts to 170˚F, ground chicken or turkey to 165˚F

● Do hrefrigerate leftover foods as soon as possible; leftovers should not remain unrefrigerated longer than 2 hours.

● While food shopping, do select frozen foods and perishables such as meat, poultry, and fish last- before checking out

● Do use smooth cutting boards made of hard maple or plastic that are free of cracks and crevices

● Do store raw meats in leak-proof containers or on the bottom of the hrefrigerator to prevent juices from dripping on other foods

● Do not allow uncooked meats, meat juices, or unwashed fruits and vegetables to come in contact with either cooked or washed foods

● Do not buy frozen seafood if the packages are open, torn, or crushed on the edges

● Do not buy food in cans that are bulging or dented, or in jars that are cracked

● Do not ever buy outdated food. Check the "use by" or "sell by" dates

● Do not buy unpasteurized milk or dairy products

● Do not buy hrefrigerated or frozen products that are not displayed at the proper temperature

● Do not let small children put foods away unsupervised

Information about this more important 's health can be subject Obtained from the Following sources: Government Gateway to Food Safety Information Http://www.foodsafety.gov US Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition [http: //vm.cfsan .fda.gov / ~ dms / wh-Food.html] Food Safety and Inspection Service United States Department of Agriculture Http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/consumerpubs.htm

Supported as an educational service by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. This information is not intended for use as medical advice. You should discuss this information with your doctor.

Identifying Differences Between TED Hose & Compression Stockings

More and more individuals require either a TED Hose or Compression Stockings due to a variety of popular conditions, Diabetes, poor circulation, excess fluids (water retention) and D.V.T (Deep Vein Thrombosis) which is a blood clot in a deep vein, usually in the leg(s), both a TED Hose and a Compression Stocking will alleviate conditions related to the mentioned conditions. Medical professionals often identify both TED hose and compression stockings by the same title, TED hose, but there is a significant difference between them.

TED hose is frequently given to patients when they are in the hospital or medical facility. TED hose are designed for individuals that are non ambulatory, or lying down 95% of the time. The compression starts in the calf and decreases as it goes up the leg. The reason the compression starts in the calf, when we are lying down fluid tends to travel no further than our mid leg. The stockings will help push additional fluid from that position up through the lymphatic system, then out the body. TED hose are usually white in color and available as a thigh high or knee high style. Normal compression generally lasts two weeks; this is why when you’re in a hospital or medical facility they consistently change your TED hose. In contrast to TED hose, compression stockings offer an array of styles and color choices; therefore they are both fashionable and comfortable. Compression stocking styles vary from knee high, thigh high, pantyhose, and maternity pantyhose.

Compression stockings are available in a sheer material, trouser sock, and athletic sock styles. Compression begins in the ankle and decreases as it goes up the leg. Individuals who have the ability to sit, stand, and walk have gravity working against them, gravity pulls away additional fluid from the upper and mid leg to the ankle and foot, thus eliminating swelling problems among others. When wearing a medical grade compression stocking, the compression begins at the forefoot and decrease as it goes up the leg pushing any extra fluid up and out of the area. Normal compression lasts six months giving the user more time before having to obtain replacement(s).

Certain circumstances allow a person to gain assistance with the purchase of compression stockings. Individuals whom are being treated for an open wound and/or ulcer have the opportunity to gain coverage from insurance as long as all necessary documentation has been made available to the provider. Typically, this consists of a prescription from your physician as well as a CMN (Certificate of Medical Necessity) completed by a wound care specialist. Most insurance differ in regards to coverage and reimbursement, be sure to check with both your doctor and your insurance to see if you are eligible to receive these products.

Acute Bronchitis Antibiotics – 4 Reasons You Must Use Them

In America alone, a number of cases of URIs, otitis media, sinusitis, pharyngitis, and acute bronchitis are diagnosed every year. Accordingly, a number of prescriptions are written to cure these disorders. According to studies conducted on the subject, around 70 percent of children and adults receive unnecessary antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis every year. In spite of an abundance of literature recommending the non-use of antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis, clinical studies reveal records of physicians prescribing antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis.

Experts on infectious diseases say that the number of patients showing resistance to antibiotics is on the rise as a result of this unnecessary use of antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis. If this practise continues, people all over the world will face serious medical problems.

There is a vast difference between acute bronchitis and COPD. Antibiotics are often used to treat the latter condition. Using antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis is not recommended because many cases of acute bronchitis are viral. Purulent sputum, a charateristic of viral bronchitis, provides ample proof that the condition is definitely viral in nature and is not bacterial. When the right treatment, support, and care is given, acute bronchitis lasts only for a maximum of seven days. In case of symptoms worsening after seven days, the use of antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis is permitted even though it is still considered non-viral.

The use of antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis is not required in all cases. However, some cases, such as the following, have to use antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis:

1. If cough persists, patients might have to use antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis. Only a fraction of patients suffering from viral bronchitis develop long-lasting cough. Antibiotics can be used even if the use of bronchodilators for 48 hours does not cause any relief. Bacteria causing persistent cough are mycoplasm pneumoniae, chlamydia pneumoniae, and bordetella pertussis. All three are easily destroyed by antibiotics such as macrolide. Azithromycin is usually prescribed because it has fewer side effects than erythromycin. You will have to take a five-day course of azithromycin, which will cost you $38.

2. If the symptoms of bronchitis is aggravating, the patients must be re-examined to determine if there is any bacterial infection. Usually, acute bronchitis is virus-caused and it disappeares after a week. However, if you are getting worse instead of better, you need to consult your doctor at once.

3. Patients with cystic fibrosis are usually infected by staphylococcus aureus, also known as gram negative bacteria, and therefore, require antibiotics. COPD patients often require antibiotic therapy to treat streptococcus pneumoniae and haemophilus influenzae.

4. An outbreak of viral influenza can complicate the treatment of acute bronchitis. It is during the flue season that adults usually suffer from bacterial complications. If your condition gets worse instead of disappearing after 7-10 days, you will have to use antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis.

Other than these four exceptions, on no other account should antibiotics be prescribed to treat acute bronchitis.

The patient has to be educated about using antibiotics to treat acute bronchitis. Often patients do not know anything about antibiotic use. Since medical practitioners have the required expertise in this regard, they should take it upon themselves to educate the public about the right use of antibiotics. Patients should know that antibiotics are not required for all illnesses. Once they know, they will not ask a doctor for antibiotics unless it is absolutely essential.

Patients should not expect antibiotic prescriptions whenever they visit a doctor. You medical expenses will be cut down if your treatment plan does not include antibiotics. You can use those savings to purchase vitamins or nutritional supplements that make your body vital enough to withstand bacterial infections that lead to conditions such as acute bronchitis.

A New Way of Looking at Stomach Aches

In evaluating stomach upsets, the physician should not only focus on hyperacidity.

New developments in research have changed the way gastric distress is diagnosed. Physicians must consider not only the possibility of hyperacidity but he or she should also examine how healthy is the patient's gastrointestinal motility.

The doctor must look into these possibilities: is stomach upset due to excess acid or a motility disorder in the esophagus, stomach and small intestine? Is there a malfunction in the way food is stored, processed and moved along the digestive tract?

So the next time you run to a doctor complaining of stomach ache that will not go away with simple medication, make sure you are checked for motility problems along with other suspected abnormalities in the digestive tract.

In dyspepsia or stomach distress, especially in the absence of any underlying disease, ulcer-like symptoms could easily suggest hyperacidity. But that is not always the case.

Dr. Olaf Nyren of the University Hospital in Uppsala, Sweden, one of a group of experts that has exhaustively studied dyspepsia, found that although functional cases (those without underlying diseases) may have ulcer-like symptoms, these may not be due to the excessive secretion of stomach juices.

The truth is, only a handful of patients with functional dyspepsia actually have hyper secretion (high gastric acid output). The majority have normal secretions.

The idea that functional dyspepsia differs from one caused by too much stomach acid has been proven in two ways by Nyren.

He did this by showing that factors other than gastric acid are responsible for the pain in functional dyspepsia. In fact, the more severe the problem is in functional dyspepsia, the lower the acid output. Thus, a reduction of acid secretion is not always effective in relieving the condition.

With this in mind, patients complaining about stomach upsets should not always be treated for hyperacidity. To the dismay of Nyren, however, many physicians, particularly general practitioners, are not aware of this and still treat patients with acid-reducing drugs.

Dr. JR Malagelada of the Mayo Clinic, another dyspepsia expert, added that approximately 50 percent of patients with functional dyspepsia have some type of motility disorder – the most common of which is reduced gastric emptying caused by slow contractions in the antral region of the stomach and increased resistance to the flow of food into the small intestine.

Although studies of gastrointestinal motility disorders have not fully told us what causes the symptoms of dyspepsia, they have helped focus attention away from abnormalities in gastric juice secretion and organic lesions as the primary causes of stomach upsets.

The bottom line? Doctors should discard the time-worn practice of prescribing antacids for every case of stomach upset. The right thing to do if you have a stomach ache is to have your gut motility checked. This will save you a lot of money and distress.

A New Way of Looking at Stomach Aches

In evaluating stomach upsets, the physician should not only focus on hyperacidity.

New developments in research have changed the way gastric distress is diagnosed. Physicians must consider not only the possibility of hyperacidity but he or she should also examine how healthy is the patient's gastrointestinal motility.

The doctor must look into these possibilities: is stomach upset due to excess acid or a motility disorder in the esophagus, stomach and small intestine? Is there a malfunction in the way food is stored, processed and moved along the digestive tract?

So the next time you run to a doctor complaining of stomach ache that will not go away with simple medication, make sure you are checked for motility problems along with other suspected abnormalities in the digestive tract.

In dyspepsia or stomach distress, especially in the absence of any underlying disease, ulcer-like symptoms could easily suggest hyperacidity. But that is not always the case.

Dr. Olaf Nyren of the University Hospital in Uppsala, Sweden, one of a group of experts that has exhaustively studied dyspepsia, found that although functional cases (those without underlying diseases) may have ulcer-like symptoms, these may not be due to the excessive secretion of stomach juices.

The truth is, only a handful of patients with functional dyspepsia actually have hyper secretion (high gastric acid output). The majority have normal secretions.

The idea that functional dyspepsia differs from one caused by too much stomach acid has been proven in two ways by Nyren.

He did this by showing that factors other than gastric acid are responsible for the pain in functional dyspepsia. In fact, the more severe the problem is in functional dyspepsia, the lower the acid output. Thus, a reduction of acid secretion is not always effective in relieving the condition.

With this in mind, patients complaining about stomach upsets should not always be treated for hyperacidity. To the dismay of Nyren, however, many physicians, particularly general practitioners, are not aware of this and still treat patients with acid-reducing drugs.

Dr. JR Malagelada of the Mayo Clinic, another dyspepsia expert, added that approximately 50 percent of patients with functional dyspepsia have some type of motility disorder – the most common of which is reduced gastric emptying caused by slow contractions in the antral region of the stomach and increased resistance to the flow of food into the small intestine.

Although studies of gastrointestinal motility disorders have not fully told us what causes the symptoms of dyspepsia, they have helped focus attention away from abnormalities in gastric juice secretion and organic lesions as the primary causes of stomach upsets.

The bottom line? Doctors should discard the time-worn practice of prescribing antacids for every case of stomach upset. The right thing to do if you have a stomach ache is to have your gut motility checked. This will save you a lot of money and distress.

Jaw hurts while chewing and eating

Look at that juicy, mouth-watering burger with smoked bacon, topped with caramelized balsamic onion, chanterelle mushroom, grilled pineapple and three kinds of cheeses.  Hmmm…high cholesterol burger.  You can’t wait to sink your teeth into one of the best burgers that was ever yanked out of a cow.  But wait, you can’t eat solid foods.  Your jaw hurts when you chew.  Your jaw also clicks and crackles when you chew and talk.  

 Each time you talk or chew you move the temporomandibular joint (TMJ).  If your jaw hurts, clicks, pops or loses its ability to open fully, then you’re not alone.  The prevalence of TMJ or jaw dysfunction in the general population is about 25%.  The TMJ is a complex junction in your skull which incorporates a disk, masticatory muscles and the interaction with your neck. 

 There are four main categories of TMJ disorders: myofascial pain, internal derangement, degenerative arthritis, and infection.  It’s beyond the scope of this article for me to discuss all of these TMJ disorders.  However, myofascial pain involving the digastrics, masseter and lateral pterygoid muscles affecting the TMJ is the most common.  Prolong opening of your mouth during dental work can negatively impact the function of your TMJ due to the stress and strain of the temporomandibular joint capsule and ligaments.   Whiplash injuries, bad head-neck posture, and chronic shoulder and neck pain can also contribute to TMJ pain. 

 Early signs of TMJ dysfunction vary from one person to another.  However, it’s commonly reported that headache, facial pain, jaw pain, impaired jaw mobility, clicking or crepitus, pain in the ear and masticatory muscles, stuffy sensation in the ears and dizzy spells are associated with TMJ dysfunction.  Chronic TMJ dysfunction can also cause you to grind and clench your teeth at night.

 If there is no resolution to your TMJ problem despite consulting with a dentist and wearing a mouth guard at night, who do you turn to?   Well, you can consult with a chiropractor who specializes in treating TMJ problems.  Whether it’s capsulitis, synovitis, meniscal derangement, tendonitis or degenerative arthritis, chiropractic, manual and soft tissue treatments have been shown to be successful in treating TMJ pain.

 You can do a few things to minimize your jaw pain until you have it assessed by a professional.  Avoid chewing gums, yawning fully or eating solid foods.  You might have to go on a soup, stew or mashed food diet until the pain subsides.  I often suggest this stretching exercise to my TMJ patients:

  • Sit in a relaxed and comfortable position. Now place your tongue in contact with the hard palate as far back as possible while keeping your jaw in a retracted position. Maintaining your tongue and jaw in this position, slowly and rhythmically open your mouth in a limited range ten times. When you finished with this warm up exercise, open your mouth as wide as possible within the pain-free limit and hold this open mouth position for about five seconds. Now relax and close your mouth for five seconds. Repeat this exercise two to three times a day.

Why You Should Eat Watermelon in the Summer

Eating watermelon in summer is not only refreshing us but also has a lot of benefits for our body. This fruit also has healing effect for them who have some diseases such as high blood pressure. Besides, the high content of water is also very helpful to prevent dehydration.

Watermelon is best solution to reduce the temperature of human body resulted from the hot weather. It is also good to be eaten by them who have high fever. Post why? Because our body neutralizes hot weather or temperature by sweating and it makes us lost a great number of water inside our body. Therefore, eating this red fruit will be helpful to increase the water content and preventing dehydration.

Besides, this fruit is also helpful to reduce the symptoms of laryngitis. It is also has high content of vitamin required by human body. However, eating too much watermelon is causing humidity and weakens lymph and gastritis. For some people, eating this fruit excessively might cause diarrhea.

There are still a lot of benefits you could get from this ball-shaped fruit. You could reduce the pain of toothache by using the husk. Dry the husk of this fruit and pound it into powder, add some ice and smear it up. You could also make pickles from the soft husk. Dice the soft husk; add sesame oil, and coriander leaves. The last, you just need to add some vinegar and you could get nice pickles from it.

So, would you like to try?

Pilates is good rehabilitation method for SI-Joint dysfunction

The Sacroiliac joint (SI-joint) is located between your pelvic (ilium) and sacrum (sacral vertebrae).This joint does not move very much but it is critical to transferring the load of the upper body to the lower body and provides shock absorption for the spine. SI-joint dysfunction is common source of back pain. The pain is dull, deep pain on your back or buttock and it may refer to the groin, down to the leg. The pain can be similar sciatica-like pain to herniated disc.

SI-joint dysfunction and pain may be caused by sacroiliac joints hypermobility (too much movement) or hypomoblity (too little movement). Si-joint hypermobility (joint instability) is typical for young woman during and after pregnancy. Abnormal or asymmetric forces to the hip and lumbar area may also cause SI-joint hypermobility or even torn ligaments around the joint.

One of the best “treatment” to the SI-joint pain and hypermobility is specific pelvic and spinal muscles strengthening and stabilization program. Pilates and lumbar spinal stabilization training are both very efficient and safe exercises for people with SI-jointdysfunction.

The exercises should focus on strengthening the “inner unit”. The inner unit includes the deep back and abdominal stabilizers; transverse abdominus and multifidus muscles as well as pelvic floor muscles and diaphragm. These muscles are your Pilates powerhouse: roof, walls and floor around your spine and pelvic. The Pilates powerhouse muscles provide stability for the SI-Joint and lumbar-pelvic girdle.

The “outer unit” is also important to stabilize your pelvic and spine. The outer unit consist of the obliques (external & internal), latissimus dorsi, erector spinae and gluteus medius & maximus muscles with thoracolumbar fascia. These muscles and fascia contribute to load transfer through the pelvic region with rotational activities and during gait. Also muscles around your hips such as hip abductors, adductors and rotators are important because they are involved in a proper function of the pelvic girdle while walking and standing.

Many Si-joint dysfunction sufferers compensate their movement (due pain) thus resulting more pain and problems also to their spine and back. To avoid further pain and problems Pilates is a wonderful tool. Only challenge is finding a good Pilates instructor who has knowledge and hands-on-skills to work with SI-joint dysfunction.

People can often get rid of SI-joint pain when they start to practice Pilates with a good teacher. A professional Pilates instructor has an eye on correcting client’s compensation patterns and underlying problems. Individually customized Pilates program can also help increase body awareness which is important part of correcting many postural habits in daily life and activities. A proper posture is extremely important for healthy SI-joint and pelvic alignment. Private Pilates training may be pricey, but it provides big help for anyone to alleviate pain and keep strong. The results will be priceless!

What is Macular Degeneration – Can it Be Cured?

Truth be told: there is a huge variety of eye conditions that people tend to suffer from. Although many of these can be corrected early on with proper medical intervention (corrective glasses, surgery, pharmaceutical products,) some conditions are brought on by the onset of advanced age. In which case, very little corrective measures can be given. Age-related macular degeneration or AMD is one such condition. According to the stats, there is a growing number of elderly suffering from AMD yearly; about 9% of the present population is already afflicted. And there are projections that in 5 years time, that number might double.

But what is macular degeneration – can it be cured?

In order to fully understand this medical condition, we need to point out certain parts of the human eye. The macula lutea, or simply macula is a yellow spot that can found near the center of one's retina. This extremely small yellow spot is responsible for absorbing too much illumination from our surroundings and shields us from reflected light that can impair our vision. The macula is also responsible for providing clarity to the eye's central vision. As the name suggests then, macular degenerationis the gradual or progressive deterioration of that yellow spot, causing the person to suffer from blotched out central vision.

A person with this condition would very likely see (from afar) the background and the people in his or her surrounding without being able to distinguish specific details. A perpetually dark, grayish or extremely light mark seems to be blocking small sections out of the images. From up close, the blurry features of a person might be seen, but the outline of the face would be clear. Distortion, whiteout spots or broken images are also commonly noted.

Macular degeneration is a rather slow progressing condition. That means that it takes years and years for the person to notice the gradually dimming or blurring of his or her vision. Depending upon the state of the macula and overall seeing prowess, some people claim to that their vision has this gradual widening of the areas they can not make out anymore. In other cases, people claim that there is a gradual darkening or whitening of areas, resulting in a vision filled with small patches.

Macular degeneration affects the elderly the most. Almost 89% of all cases are AMDs or age-related macular degeneration. However, there are reported cases of children below the age of 10 who have the said condition. Unfortunately, this medical condition is also hereditary, brought on by genes that can also cause an assortment of diseases.

The sad thing about this is that there is still no known cure or remedy yet for macular degeneration. Prevention is also a dicey subject since genetics and diseases are two of the most primary considerations here. However, health care providers are advocating ways on how to slow down the progression of this medical condition. One would be to get an eye exam ASAP, especially if you know that your family has a history of macular degeneration. Another recommendation is to shift to a healthier lifestyle, especially for people already at the prime of their life. When it comes to diet, an antioxidant and omega-3 fatty acid diet would be beneficial.

Fibromyalgia and Severe Pain Symptoms

Fibromyalgia is a common diagnosis for patients that suffer from sore joints, aching muscles, fatigue, impaired immunity, sleep disorders, disturbed microcirculation, and reduced level of energy. When these symptoms occur side by side with autoimmune symptoms, chances are the patient is suffering from fibromyalgia.

Fibromyalgia is difficult to diagnose as majority of physicians and medical practitioners are still uneducated and ignorant about this condition. This is a sad thought because this condition, though may seem harmless, is actually progressive and destructing. Fibromyalgia patients usually suffer from lack of the synovial fluid in the body. These fluids provide lubrication for the joints.

Fibromyalgia comes with a lot of symptoms. Symptoms affect a huge range of body systems. From the respiratory, such as nocturnal sinus stuffiness, post nasal drip, runny nose to the digestive tract, difficulty swallowing, dry cough, sore throat, reflux esophagitis, carbohydrate / chocolate craving, appendicitis-like pains, and unexplained toothaches.

Some symptoms like, unexplained allergies, drooling in sleep, swollen glands, dizziness when turning head or changing field of view, stiff neck, mold / yeast infection, headaches, light / broken sleep pattern, morning stiffness, sweats, fatigue, painful or weak grip, problems holding hands up, handwriting difficulties, shortness of breath, night-driving difficulty, short-term memory impairment, sensitivity to odors, trouble concentrating, sore spot on top of head, balance problems, difficulty speaking known words, loss of ability to distinguish some shades of colors greatly affect everyday activities and can be a cause of extreme discomfort.

Some rather abnormal symptoms include the feeling of continued movement in a car after stopping, the feeling of being tilted when cornering a car, when taking first steps in the morning feels as if one is walking on nails, pressure felt on eyeglasses and headbands is painful , and getting scarred or bruised easily.

Other symptoms that affects other body systems include visual perception problems, doubling / blurry / changing vision, visual and audio effects, bloating, nausea, abdominal cramps, sensitivity to pressure / colds / lights, weight gain, weight loss, mitral valve prolapse, earaches , irregular heartbeats, rapid heartbeats, directional disorientation, drooping of the eyelid, tearing or reddening of the eye.

This disease also traverse even the psychological aspect of the body, resulting to extreme depression, panic attacks, tendency to cry easily, confused states, problems climbing stairs, problems going down the stairs, free-floating anxiety, unaccountable irritability, dizziness caused by seeing stripes and checks, teeth grinding, inability to recognize familiar surroundings, delayed reactions and such.

Oftentimes, symptoms vary according to sex. Women often experience menstrual problems, pelvic pain, PMS, loss of libido, nail ridges, mood swings, hypersensitive nipples, breast pain, and fibrocystic breasts as symptoms. Men, on the other hand, tend to experience urine retention, groin pain, impotence, stress incontinence, anal / genital / perineal pain, painful intercourse, and thick secretions.

Common symptoms for both sexes include lower back pain, mottled skin, thumb pain and tingling numbness, weak ankles, upper / lower leg cramps, tight Achilles tendon, irritable bowel, sciatica, urinary frequency, muscle twitching, diffuse swelling, buckling knee, shin splint-type pain, sensory overload, staring into space, heel pain, tight hamstrings, carpal tunnel-like pain in the wrists, restless leg syndrome, myoclonus, and tissue overgrowth, fibroids hairs, ingrown hairs, heavy and splitting cuticles, and adhesions .

If you are experiencing a number of these symptoms, take an appointment with your physician before it's too late.

Information on Hip and Thigh Pain

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint, surrounded by large muscles. The ball, the round head of the femur (thigh bone), is set deeply in the acetabulum, a deep socket or cavity in the pelvis. The joint is very stable. The majority of long-term hip problems are associated with aging, disease (such as arthritis) and fractures. But pain in the hip and thigh also can be caused by injury to muscles, tendons or bursas, usually from a fall, a blow or overuse.

Hip pain in athletes involves a wide differential diagnosis. Adolescents and young adults are at particular risk for various apophyseal and epiphyseal injuries due to lack of ossification of these cartilaginous growth plates. Older athletes are more likely to present with tendinitis in these areas because their growth plates have closed. Several bursae in the hip area are prone to inflammation. The trochanteric bursa is the most commonly injured, and the lesion is easily identified by palpation of the area.

Quadricep, hamstring, and Iliotibial band injuries can be quite painful. However, there are several ways to help stablize muscular pulls. Compression braces can help provide stabilization to the torn muscle fibers and improve the ability to walk or help protect from futher injury. Ice packs and cold wraps help reduce pain and inflammation, and pain relief gels can provide temporary relief of painful symptoms. Many athletes use magnetic products to stimulate blood flow and reduce pain.

One of the biggest causes of hip and back pain is the psoas muscle. These problems include but are not limited to lower back pain, sciatica, disc problems, knee pain, pelvic tilting, digestive problems, infertility, and menstruation pain. You could also experience scoliosis, a difference in the length of your legs, kyphosis, sacroiliac pain and accentuated lumbar lordosis.

Bursitis in the hip usually involves the hip socket and causes tenderness, pain, and swelling on the outer part of the hip where some of the large buttock muscles attach. Bursitis in the hip can cause pain that spreads to the buttocks and down as far as the knee. Bursitis in the hip can be caused by activities such as speed-walking, aerobic dance, or carrying a baby on your hip. It also can be caused by conditions that alter the normal tilt of the pelvis, such as having one leg shorter than the other.

As the pain improves, gradually begin to exercise. It is best to work with a physical therapist to learn proper exercises and how to advance your activity. Swimming may be a good option because it stretches the muscles and builds good muscle tone without straining your hip joint. However, swimming does not build bone mass. When you are ready (a physical therapist can help determine that), slowly and carefully resume walking or another activity against the resistance of gravity.

A hip fracture can change the quality of your life significantly. Fewer than 50% of those with a hip fracture return to their former level of activity. In addition, while recovering from a hip fracture, several possible complications can be life-threatening. These include pneumonia and a blood clot in the leg, which can dislodge and travel to cause a clot in the lungs. Both are due to immobility following a hip fracture and hip surgery.

A groin pull can be caused by a quick change in direction while you’re moving—often occurring in sports such as hockey, tennis, and basketball. A groin pull can result in pain, tenderness, and stiffness deep in the groin, making activity difficult.