Orthopedics – Orthopedic Surgeons

Modern medicine is an exciting and innovative field of science. Health care remains as one of our nation’s primary concerns, and today is more controversial and talked about then ever before. There will always be a high demand for nurses and doctors in the job market. New technologies and breakthroughs in the medical field are constantly allowing us to find safer and more effective ways of treating injuries and health issues. Most important among the features of the body is the skeleton; the body’s natural frame and foundation. Patients suffering from a fractured ankle or spine are brought to an orthopedic specialist. These doctors are among the most highly qualified and skilled in the entirety of medical practitioners.

Doctors are trained in different fields and specialize in particular surgical methods. Doctors specialized in orthopedics are skilled surgeons operating specifically on the musculoskeletal system. Typical services provided by these doctors include the treatment of damage to the skeleton, infections, and congenital disorders. Patients who experience severe trauma or stress to their skeletal system, such as a broken bone or spinal fracture, will find themselves under the care of an orthopedics specialist. They also subspecialize in a variety of distinct and helpful surgeries, including joint reconstruction, hand, and spine surgery. Doctors practicing orthopedics rely on surgical and non-surgical means to treat a number of physically handicapping and life-threatening problems. As a result, surgeons go through a rigorous and exemplary education and training.

A surgeon studying orthopedics must complete eight years of college. Most complete a four year undergraduate degree, preceded by four years of medical school. Following this, graduates are expected to complete a five year residency training program, where they will learn basic and advanced orthopedic surgery techniques. These residence programs are highly competitive, generally only granted to the top positions of the graduating class. Only a small percentage of practicing physicians are orthopedic specialists, making this a highly competitive field amongst doctors. After completing residency, further training is pursued in a subspecialized category, and lasts one to two years. Upon completing this final specialized treatment, orthopedic doctors are eligible for induction into the American Board of Medical Specialties.

Operations practiced in the field of orthopedics include a wide range of surgeries including hip and knee replacement, spinal fusion and bone grafting and fracture repair. Arthroscopy is a surgical field that compliments and is utilized by orthopedic surgeons to repair or replace joints. An arthroscope is a type of endoscope: an instrument inserted into a small incision in order to view the interior of an organ or bone cavity. This allows the surgeon to examine and perform their surgery without opening the patient completely, enabling less surgical trauma and a swifter recovery. These methods are preferred when operating on professional athletes, who require a speedy recovery time and minimal damage to their performance-based physique.

The services and benefits of these health care professionals is vital to a proper and functioning hospital. The surgeries they perform are highly complicated operations, requiring the steady hand and utmost care of a highly trained individual.