How to Stop Stammering

If you want to put an end to your stammering on your own, not having to rely on pathologists and professional therapists to help you, there are only two things you need to remember. First of all, your perceptions, attitude and feelings regarding your stutter. Second, you must change your behavior connected to the stammer.

To change those perceptions, attitudes and feelings, you have to do something to lessen, or even remove, your fear of speaking in front of others, of the mingling in social life, and of making yourself look like a fool. In other words, you must overcome your urge to avoid situations where someone may expect you to speak, whether as a guest speaker or as part of a group.

As a matter of fact, you need to make a real effort, as often as you can, to speak out. To stop stammering, more often than not practice is a great way. As an example, use one of your daily activities like coffee break at work, as an opportunity to practice your speech patterns.

Even a small thing like asking a complete stranger for directions can be a way to ease your anger and fear of speaking to others. And by having enough self-love and a grown self-confidence will definitely take you a long way toward recovery!

The abnormal behaviors that are connected to your stammering takes more effort to change, but it's very effective in self-therapy. You have to familiarize yourself with the primary and secondary behaviors that occurs every time you stammer.

These are behaviors that includes prolongations, repetitions and blocks (primary) and also loss of eye contact, jerking with the head, and the use of filler words, such as "ah" and "you know" (secondary). These are behaviors that you need to take control over.

Let me give an example. To stop stammering while you talk to a superior, try and gather your thoughts before you speak. Maintain eye contact and speak slowly and clearly. And pay attention to your speech patterns, especially the use of filler words.

In fact, the road down to stop stammering can be reduced to two things: changing your mental attitude and taking control over your physical behavior. In time, you will find that your speech patterns will be normal.