How to Clean a Cats Infected Wound?

I think my cat has been in a fight. I could see little scab marks but everything looked fine. Then suddenly a few weeks later I noticed that he had a lump, a swinging on the side of his hip. He had started limping and not being so agile.

I inspected this lump, there was a real foul smell but I could not see an open wound, directed up wound or scab, so I knew that he would need to visit the vets but I would keep a close eye on him till the vets opened as it was out of hours. I kept inspecting the lump and on this occasion saw what looked like a little dried blood but could not see where it had come from. I got some cotton wool and warm water and bathed the area but could still not find any opening where this blood was coming from.

Again the next morning, I went to find the cat straight away and there he was sitting on his favorite chair. I could not see the lump sticking out, but could see a wet slick patch of fur. On closer inspection there were a couple of small holes and blood around them. He had been attaching to this himself, and must have made an opening. There was still a little pus slowing seeping out, and still quite a foul smell.

So what do I do now. The vets are still not open. The first thing was I knew I had to clean this area. He had been cleaning it but his mouth etc would not be very clean and could possibly introduce more infection. So how was I going to clean it. Yes, I could get cotton wool and use some warm salted water to clean the area but was this the best and right course of action to take.

I then realized that I needed to like wash and flush the wound out to remove any residual pus, dirt and debris. So I put the cat in the bath and needed some assistance and someone to keep him in the bath. Then luckily, I had an old syringe to insert liquid into his mouth from a previous illness but a small water bottle would probably do the trick. By using one of these methods pushing the warm water solution out with some force on, above and around the area, should force and wash the area removing any pus, infection, dirt and debris away and less likely to move around any infection to a different area. The cat did not particularly like this, which is why I needed someone to hold him still, but it was probably quicker and caused less pain to the sensitive damaged tissue area which was now on show than actually touching or dabbing the area. The next important thing is to keep this clean.

Now the abscess and pus seemed to have disbursed, it was now not causing my cat so much discomfort and did not seem to be bothering him. He did not seem to be trying to keep cleaning the area himself. However, for added protection, I continued to wash the area in this way regularly to ensure that the area was kept clean until the next morning when I can ring the vets and get an appointment. This lump had been an abscess, from a very small puncture wound when he had been fighting but had left no mark.

At the time I did not know it needed attention and he was infected inside but at least I found a way to look after when it did become clear.