Heat Rash,Causes and Treatments

Did you ever go through this scenario? You feel itchy and notice some pink bumps and red spots on your body. A friend says it looks like prickly heat rash. Symptoms include itching and a couple of blisters. One thing that is different in your schedule is that you’ve been exercising more. In the past, doing yoga, there was no sweat rash because it was gentle yoga. But now since the injury has healed, you are engaging in more strenuous exercise. Does this sound like you.

If you want to get rid of heat rash, it’s important to cool the body down by using a fan, being in an air-conditioned room or showering in coo or warm water. After the shower, let the air dry before putting on clothing. Corn starch, baby powder, aloe and vitamins a and d cream are helpful to those with this ailment. Others find medicated powders, zinc oxide lotions and anti-chafing creams useful.

After a few days they dry and form yellowish crusts. Although the sore heals in six to ten days, the virus remains in the body in a latent form in the nerve trunks. A recurrence can be triggered by excess exposure to the sun, a fever or other bodily stresses. The incubation period is two to twelve days after exposure. And the child usually feels a burning, tingling or itching sensation at the spot where the sore will appear. Although highly contagious, the virus is only contagious when the sores are visible. It is not contagious during the latent period while the virus hides within the nerve trunks. There is no cure for the virus and treatment centers around relieving discomfort and preventing secondary infections.

Causes

Among babies or infants, heat rashes occur due to their developing sweat glands which fail to transport sebum or natural oil to the skin’s surface. Heat rash in babies generally occurs on the forehead, neck and shoulders. In adults, heat rash is often a result of the sweat pores getting blocked by the sebum and dead skin cells. The elbow, neck, chest and breast are the affected areas of the skin in adults.

While it can be irritating and frustrating, prickly heat is not usually a serious condition. Adult heat rash can be easily treated and usually clears up within a matter of days. As soon as you begin to notice clusters of small blisters which come and go with exposure to warm weather and sunlight, you should take some immediate self help measures. The primary step to take is to avoid wearing tight clothing, particularly when exercising. The more air that can get to the skin, the better off you’ll be as that acts as a natural healing agent. In cases of infant heat rash, it is recommended that you allow the baby to go without a diaper whenever possible.

During the early months of World War II, American troops battling for the islands of the South Pacific were also doing battle with an annoying rash known to doctors as miliaria and to the rest of us as ‘heat rash’ or ‘prickly heat’. The intense burning and itching sensation of prickly heat is caused by a blockage of the sweat ducts. Strained by intense heat and humidity, the body’s evaporative cooling system breaks down, and instead of being exuded through the pores, sweat becomes trapped beneath the skin, resulting in a rash that feels like its name.

Treatments

If you live in or visit a hot, humid climate then heat rash will be something you will need to manage on a day to day basis. During the hottest time of the day, try and keep cool by staying indoors where air conditioning or fans are keeping the temperature regulated.

Also, where possible try and wear loose fitting clothes made from natural fibers such as cotton. The loose fit will allow for air flow keeping you dryer, and natural fibers are breathable materials so they allow heat to escape. Synthetic fibers such as polyester and microfiber on the other hand are synthetic fibers which trap the heat in. They are great for keeping warm in winter but definitely not appropriate if you want to keep cool in summer.

During the early months of World War II, American troops battling for the islands of the South Pacific were also doing battle with an annoying rash known to doctors as miliaria and to the rest of us as ‘heat rash’ or ‘prickly heat’. The intense burning and itching sensation of prickly heat is caused by a blockage of the sweat ducts. Strained by intense heat and humidity, the body’s evaporative cooling system breaks down, and instead of being exuded through the pores, sweat becomes trapped beneath the skin, resulting in a rash that feels like its name.