Gastritis Digestive System and How it Works

Gastritis

Gastritis is an inflammation, irritation or erosion of the lining of the stomach. It can occur suddenly (acute) or gradually (chronic).

Human Digestive System

The human digestive system is a complex series of organs and glands that processes food. In order to use the food we eat, our body has to break the food down into smaller molecules that it can process; it also has to excrete waste.

Gastritis Causes and symptoms

Gastritis can be caused by drinking too much alcohol, prolonged use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin or ibuprofen, or infection with bacteria such as Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Sometimes gastritis develops after major surgery, traumatic injury, burns, or severe infections.

Acute gastritis occurs suddenly and is more likely to cause nausea and burning pain or discomfort in your upper abdomen. Chronic gastritis develops gradually and is more likely to cause a dull pain and a feeling of fullness or loss of appetite after a few bites of food.

Your Digestive System and How It Works

Organs that make up the digestive tract are the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine—also called the colon—rectum, and anus. Inside these hollow organs is a lining called the mucosa. In the mouth, stomach, and small intestine, the mucosa contains tiny glands that produce juices to help digest food.

The Mouth Starts Everything Moving

Even before you eat, when you smell a tasty food, see it, or think about it, digestion begins. Saliva (say: suh-lye-vuh), or spit, begins to form in your mouth. When you do eat, the saliva breaks down the chemicals in the food a bit, which helps make the food mushy and easy to swallow.

Digestive Diseases and Medications

Digestion is the complex process of turning the food you eat into the energy you need to survive. The digestion process also involves creating waste to be eliminated.

Food passes down the throat, down through a muscular tube called the esophagus, and into the stomach, where food continues to be broken down. The partially digested food passes into a short tube called the duodenum (first part of the small intestine).

Celiac disease is an immune reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. An estimated 1 percent of all Americans suffer from celiac disease, though many have never been diagnosed and are not receiving treatment.

Dietary Treatments for Gastritis

Vitamin C has the capacity to help in the absorption of iron and calcium salts in the body. This eases the digestive process. Therefore, the diet must be rich in vitamin C. Foods that contain vitamin C to a commendable quantity are amlas, oranges, etc.

Ayurvedic Treatment for Gastritis

There is a list of other Ayurvedic preparations that are useful in the treatment of gastritis. Some of these are Dhaatri loha, Sukumara ghrita, Sootashekhara rasa, Kaamadudha rasa, Leela Vilas rasa, Chandrakala rasa and Amalapittantaka rasa.

All-fruit diet

After the acute symptoms subside, the patient should adopt an all-fruit diet for the next three days and take juicy fruits such as apples, pears, grapes, grapefruit, oranges, pineapple, peaches, and melons.

The stomach is the most acidic part of the body, setting the
stage both for ulcer development and infection. Three types of
cells pump out the ingredients of gastric juice: mucous-secreting
cells, chief cells that release digestive enzymes, and parietal
cells that produce hydrochloric acid.