CPPS Causes Uncomfortable Penis Pain

Even the mention of penis pain is enough to get some guys feeling tense. All men know how very sensitive the penis is; that sensitivity is responsible for the glorious feelings a male experiences during orgasm, but it’s also responsible for the intense pain that the manhood sometimes suffers. Proper penis care helps to strengthen the organ, but penis pain still occurs. Getting hit in the crotch is one common source, but it’s passing pain. Something like CPPS (chronic pelvic pain syndrome) is longer lasting.

What is CPPS?

CPPS is a condition which can strike both men and women; when it occurs in men, it may go by other names, such as chronic nonbacterial prostatitis. CPPS is defined as a pain or discomfort in the pelvic area that lasts for three months or longer and does not have a bacterial agent as the cause.

There is still a great deal being learned about CPPS, and at this point, most of the time a diagnosis is arrived at by ruling out other possible causes – which means that it can take some time before a proper diagnosis is made. When a man has CPPS, he experiences penis pain (sometimes significant) and has urinary symptoms similar to a urinary tract infection – but without the bacteria that cause such an infection. Sexual dysfunction, frequently related to the penis pain, is also typical.

CPPS is found in between 2% and 16% of men around the world and is thought to be the most common urologic disease in men who are under 50 years of age. (Women also have a female version of CPPS.)

When a man has CPPS, there is a general underlying discomfort in the pelvic region, sometimes specifically in the penis, sometimes elsewhere in the region (the balls, the perineum, etc.). Penis pain is often pronounced when urinating or ejaculating.

Prevention and treatment

Although doctors do not yet know the cause of CPPS, there are theories. Some suspect it is an immune disorder, others suspect increased pressure in the prostate, and some suggest trauma may be a factor.

However, in some men there do seem to be some identifiable triggers which are associated with CPPS. These include possible reactions to food or drink, especially spicy foods, alcohol, coffee and tea. Lack of sufficient exercise can also help bring about CPPS in some men. Therefore, prevention strategies often involve dietary changes to limit potential triggers and programs to ensure greater physical activity.

There are numerous treatment options which may be employed in treating CPPS and its symptoms. In addition to changing the diet and increasing exercise, doctors may recommend a range of medications. Anti-inflammatory drugs as well as pain medications are often used, as are muscle relaxants. Alpha blockers are often prescribed, as these can help relax the muscles around the prostate. Prostate massagers are also sometimes utilized for the same purpose. When pain is intense while sitting, use of a pillow or inflatable ring may be beneficial. Some men report improvement from use of acupuncture.

Men with CPPS may experience psychological issues because of the pain, and these can often worsen the condition. Counseling is often recommended to help a man learn how to better deal the disorder when it is chronic and long lasting.

Working with a doctor is important to relieve penis pain from CPPS. When the penis is already in good shape, that helps to deal with conditions like CPPS, so men are urged to daily apply a top notch penis health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). Keeping penis skin well moisturized helps provide some soothing relief, so select a crème that includes both a high end emollient (such as shea butter) and a natural hydrator (such as vitamin E). In addition, look for a crème that contains vitamin D, which when added to a personal care regimen can provide important health benefits (especially during the long dark winter months).