Cervical Myomas

Cervical myomas are non-cancerous tumors in the cervix or lower part of the uterus. Myomas are tumors made of muscle tissue. Often, cervical myomas are also seen with myomas in the upper part of the uterus also called fibroids. Myomas have many sizes; the large ones may be seen protruding into the vagina. Large myomas that protrude are called prolapsed myoma. There is always a possibility that myomas may become infected. They may be the cause of bleeding. Myomas also can block the passage of urine.

The Underlying Cause of Myoma

According to experts, the cause of myoma is estrogen dominance or too much quantity of estrogen in the body compared to the quantity of progesterone. Estrogen causes the proliferation of body cells. In contrast, progesterone slows down body cells; it prevents them from reproducing.

The Symptoms of Cervical Myoma

Some cases of cervical myomas are asymptomatic. Most cases, especially those dealing with large myomas, cause symptoms.  

One of the most common symptoms of cervical myoma is bleeding. Bleeding can be either mild or heavy. The heavy type of bleeding caused by cervical myoma may result in anemia.
A feeling of fatigue and physical weakness may also be experienced by women suffering from cervical myoma.
Women with this illness may also experience pain during sexual intercourse.
Another symptom of cervical myoma is when a woman feels heaviness and swelling in the abdomen.
Those who suffer from cervical myoma may also have difficulty urinating because the growth obstructs urine flow. Cervical myomas may cause urinary tract infections.

How a Cervical Myoma is Diagnosed

When one feels the above symptoms, she should go to a gynecologist. The doctor identifies the myoma during physical examination, in particular, pelvic inspection. Prolapsed myomas are easily seen. Doctors may also feel myomas when they check the cervix with one hand while the other hand is placed on top of the abdomen.

One reliable method that doctors use in diagnosing cervical myoma is by obtaining an image of the cervix and uterus through an ultrasound device inserted into the area, a procedure called transvaginal ultrasonography. In the process, it is also detected whether or not the myoma causes obstruction of the urine flow.  

In order to address the problem of anemia, blood tests are undertaken to determine whether or not there may be cervical cancer, a certain test called Papanicolaou or Pap test is usually done.

The Treatment of Cervical Myoma

If the size of the myoma is small it usually does not cause symptoms. If this is the case, no treatment may be necessary. However, if the cervical myoma is big, it causes discomfort and even complications. In this case, the cervical myoma is surgically taken out. The procedure of removing cervical myoma is called myomectomy. Sometimes, only the myoma is removed. In this case, the patient may still become pregnant.  In cases dealing with bigger myomas, the entire uterus is removed in a process called hysterectomy. Unfortunately, women who have undergone hysterectomy can no longer have children.