Aquatic Physical Therapy As an Add-On to Stroke Recovery

Water is life and can restore life. It has many therapeutic properties, which includes reviving the use of bodily functions lost due to a stroke. Commonly known as hydrotherapy, water has been used as far back as ancient Egyptian civilization to relieve pain and treat diseases by improving circulation.

Water therapy is known to treat stress, rheumatism, arthritis, burns, hemorrhoids, spasticity, musculoskeletal disorders, and stroke patients with paralysis. Rehabilitation of stroke patients through hydrotherapy will also help improve not only their tissue’s health but also their joint health and movement, increase strength in weakened muscles, stretch spastic muscles, and uplift overall quality of life.

It is so effective that many hospitals and rehabilitation facilities have acquired machines for physical therapy that apply the use of water therapy.

Nowadays, you can go to spas that offer different forms of hydrotherapy to clients. Spas have specially-designed showers that implore massage techniques that focus on different muscle parts through the use of pressurized hot or cold water. There are some spas that have aromatherapy pools just like the ones used by the royalty of ancient times where special oils like lavender are added to aid in the treatment.

If you love swimming or simply being in the water, a trip to a hydrotherapy spa in your area would really be a fun way for you to spend time while you relieve yourself from pain and recover from your disability due to stroke. It would also be a great time to bond with your family and relax from all the stress you’ve been through.

Now, if you’re looking for a more structured approach that you can use as part of your rehabilitation program, there are facilities that offer aquatic exercises specially meant for stroke patients. Aquatic exercise is another form of water therapy used for treatment of stroke patients and injured athletes, among others.

Aquatic exercises are actually a lot easier for stroke patients to do because the water’s buoyancy allows them to move freely. Unlike exercising on land, activities like walking, balancing, stretching, aerobics, coordination, and strengthening can be done by stroke patients without fear and difficulty as the water supports them.

The book “Aquatic Exercise for Rehabilitation & Training” by Lori Brody and Paula Geigle, which also comes in DVD and VCD, is a great reference to aquatic exercises. It prescribes the right aquatic exercise programs stroke patients can use for their recovery. The book also thoroughly explains everything stroke patients and their therapists need to efficiently carry out a rehabilitation program that meets the stroke patient’s abilities and limitations.

Hydrotherapy and aquatic physical exercises are great add ons to stroke treatment. It is an enjoyable way to recover from stroke, regain confidence, cultivate social skills, and invigorate family ties.