Alopecia in Men and Women Explained

My friend's 28- and 24-year old sons both have hair problems. The former has begun to lose his hair, while his younger brother is developing round, bald spots on his head. At such early age, one wonders which really causes hair loss, or baldness, and if there's anything that can be done to prevent it.

Hair loss – known as alopecia in the medical field – assumes different forms. In men, the most common pattern is the one in which hair starts to thin at the crown and the hairline begins to diminish. The exact sequence of this typical male-pattern hair loss goes this way: The hairline starts to recede at the forehead, and then at the temples and crown. In the end, the bare areas merge and only a fringe of hair is left at the back of the head and around the ears. This form is chiefly genetic in origin; it is primed by the presence of androgens (male hormones).

It is widely understood that one loser scalp hair as he or she gets older. It is likewise generally known that the tendency of some men or women to begin losing hair at an early age, and at a reliably fast rate, is hereditary.

The particular case of my friend's younger son is medically termed alopecia areata. This condition is characterized by the occurrence of hair loss in patches that produces a totally bare area encircled by normal hair growth. A number of scientific researchers point to the basic cause of this type of alopecia as being both genetic and immunological.

In women, abnormal loss of hair may happen temporarily after childbirth; or it may be the result of certain infections, ringworm, or even diabetes. While women do not usually suffer from total hair loss, their hair often thins as they get older. One of the usual contributing factors in alopecia in women is the hormonal changes that take place during the "change of life" (menopause).

Another type of the condition in women is referred to as traction alopecia. This form is associated with such hair styles – as ponytails – in which the hair is folded tautly away from the scalp. Excessive hair brushing and the use of rollers for an extended period are possible causes of this type of alopecia, too.

It is important that the person fully understands his or her particular hair-loss condition, especially when considering going through certain medical treatment processes or using prescription drugs. A better alternative to preventing this condition may well be a natural treatment approach. In this regard, men and women have to learn about the breakthrough information that reveal how one can stop hair loss naturally, strengthen, revitalize and restore thinning hair, and retain healthier, fuller, thicker hair.

Stop and prevent male and female alopecia and strengthen, revitalize and restore thinning hair. Learn about the breakthrough information that reveal how you can stop hair loss naturally and retain healthy, fuller, thicker hair. Visit Hair Loss No More at Preventing Alopecia .

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